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Thread: Erik Satie

  1. #76
    Senior Member SanAntone's Avatar
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    Listening to the Gymnopedies and Gnossiennes from this complete set of the solo piano music -

    satie jean-yves thibaudet.jpg

    I remember when I first heard these works. I was in music school, and something of a fish out of water. My background had not been in classical music when I entered music school to study theory and composition. I had been playing jazz. So, when I heard these works, I found a harmonic language that was familiar. I had and still feel that the sound of most classical music was foreign to me. Of course this is true, it is European and I am a 100% American. The music that was in my blood was jazz, blues, R&B, rock - the last thing I could relate to was Beethoven, Mozart and especially Wagner.

    But with Satie I heard major-seventh chords resolving to unrelated chords in modal progressions. Just like what I had been playing in countless jazz improvisations.

    Here's a quote from Morton Feldman, another favorite composer of mine, that lays out the idea of breaking with the traditional classical tradition in order to create a new classical music:

    Feldman, echoing Cage, wrote of his earliest compositional orientation that, “Only by ‘unfixing’ the elements traditionally used to construct a piece of music could the sounds exist in themselves—not as symbols, or memories which were memories of other music to begin with”. The stated desire of the composer was to penetrate beneath, beyond, the perceived historical obstructions to hearing, arriving unencumbered at the origins of unmediated sound, into the very heart of its sonorous matter.

    I later came to understand than Satie was an inspiration to John Cage.

    Cage, Feldman, and Satie - these were some of my composer heroes when I was younger and in music school. I still listen to their music, and it still has the power to unhinge traditional classical music lovers.
    Last edited by SanAntone; Feb-27-2021 at 02:40.

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  3. #77
    Senior Member RogerWaters's Avatar
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    I adore Satie’s Gnossienes. But I also love Beethoven, mozart and wagner, along with a hell of a lot of other music.

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  5. #78
    Senior Member SanAntone's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by RogerWaters View Post
    I adore Satie’s Gnossienes. But I also love Beethoven, mozart and wagner, along with a hell of a lot of other music.
    Oh, sure, I do too. By the time I left music school I had developed a healthy appreciation for the classical music repertory. Although I've never learned how to enjoy Wagner, Mahler (with some exceptions) and most of the large 19th century orchestral literature.

    Chamber music is my preferred form, also solo piano music. Sacred choral music, beginning with the earliest, chant, Medieival, Renaissance music still occupies much of my listening time. Bach was an early and continuing favorite.

    But Satie was my gateway, that led to Poulenc, Ravel, Debussy and the 20th century French school.

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  7. #79
    Senior Member SanAntone's Avatar
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    Trois Morceaux en forme de poire
    R. et G. Casadesus



    An early success for Satie Trois Morceaux despite the title is actually seven short pieces with the three morceaux surrounded by two introductory and two ending sections. It has been said that the title was in response to a comment Satie's friend Claude Debussy said, i.e. his work did not have any form.
    Last edited by SanAntone; Jun-14-2021 at 12:22.

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