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Thread: Serge/Sergie Rachmaninoff/Rachmaninov

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    Default Serge/Sergie Rachmaninoff/Rachmaninov

    There's so many ways to say and spell his name Does anyone know what it was officially?

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    Senior Member Ephemerid's Avatar
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    His actual name would've been in Cyrillic (I think?) so its all transliteration anyway. Likewise this would go for Stravinski/Stravinsky/Strawinski (that one is a German transliteration I think?)... Profofiev/Prokofieff... Dostoevski/Dostoevsky... Tolstoi/Tolstoy etc. I'm not sure what determines the different ways of transliterating Russian words & names into the western European alphabet, but its probably some sort of system like how Chinese has two systems of transliteration, Wales-Giles and Pinyin.

    So I guess there is no official way, though I guess if there are two (or more?) transliteration systems for Cyrillic you'd have to be consistent?

    ~josh
    "There is no theory. You have only to listen. Pleasure is the law.” ~ Claude Debussy

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    Senior Member Ephemerid's Avatar
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    ACK! Its a lot more complicated than I thought! LOL

    ~josh
    "There is no theory. You have only to listen. Pleasure is the law.” ~ Claude Debussy

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    Wow....


    I'll just stick with Rachmaninoff

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    Senior Member Ephemerid's Avatar
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    PUT IT BACK IN THE BOX!!! LOL

    ~josh
    "There is no theory. You have only to listen. Pleasure is the law.” ~ Claude Debussy

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    i think it depends on tha language you're using: german or english.
    if you are familiar with phonetics in both languages, you'll notice that rachmaninov and rachmaninoff, shostakovich and schostakowitsch and tchaikovsky and tschaikowski all read the same.

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    Junior Member artisan's Avatar
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    Well, I do know that in German, a w makes a v sound...
    Actually, I used to speak Pennsylvania Dutch fluently, but I have forgotten most of it now. Pennsylvania Dutch has a lot of english mixed in with it anyway.
    Johanna
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