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Thread: Hidden Gems

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    Question Hidden Gems

    I am preparing a program for The Villages, Florida Classical Music Club (230 members) on hidden gems of classical music and would appreciate any suggestions you might have. Our club is a mix of inexperienced but appreciative listeners of classical music up to professional musicians. Perhaps a few examples from past presentations of music the majority of the group both liked and had not heard before will help calibrate you on their level of experience: Marco Enrico Bossi's Giga, Anton Rubinstein's Kamenoi Ostro, Phillip Glass's The Light from his 4th symphony.
    Thanks

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    Senior Member Ephemerid's Avatar
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    Sounds like a great idea Denny!

    As far as "hidden gems" go, how about these?

    Lou Harrison: Suite for Cello and Harp
    John Cage: In a Landscape (for piano)
    Erik Satie: Socrate (two version: soprano & orchestra or temor & piano)
    Igor Stravinsky: Apollon musagetes (for string orchestra)
    Igor Stravinsky: Eight Instrumental Miniatures
    Toru Takemitsu: Tree-Line (for chamber orchestra)
    Toru Takemitsu: Garden Rain (for brass ensemble)
    Claude Debussy: Sonata for flute, viola and harp
    Claude Debussy: Danse sacree et profane (for harp and strings)
    Aaron Copland: Our Town Suite
    Ingolf Dahl: Conertino a Tre (for clarinet, violin and cello)
    Ralph Vaughan-Williams: Silent Noon (I prefer the version for baritone and piano)


    Also, Stokowski did a nice orchestration of Debussy's The Engulfed Cathedral...

    The Takemitsu pieces are the only rather "radical"sounding pieces, but its far from Schoenberg.

    The Harrison piece is probably VERY hard to find. If you are interested in that piece, I can direct you to it (hopefully it is not out of print)-- just PM me.

    ~josh
    "There is no theory. You have only to listen. Pleasure is the law.” ~ Claude Debussy

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    Senior Member Kurkikohtaus's Avatar
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    Sibelius: Kurkikohtaus

    (Scene with Cranes from Kuolema)

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    Senior Member ChamberNut's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by fool on the hill View Post
    Claude Debussy: Danse sacree et profane (for harp and strings)~josh
    Love this one Josh! I have that version for harp and strings, there is also a harp and orchestra version.

    Another hidden gem is Dvorak's The Wild Dove symponic poem.

    For lovers of classical guitar music, check out French composer Antoine de Lhoyer (1768-1852)

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    Assistant Administrator Chi_townPhilly's Avatar
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    Some years back, EMI had a whole "sub-label" dedicated to this concept- they called it "Matrix."
    However, since examples of what was recorded included Schoenberg's Verklärte Nacht and Hindemith's Trauermusik, I suppose that this isn't sufficiently obscure for your group of enthusiasts.
    I'm most familiar with examples that might be described as "our grandparents liked them more than we do:" like Flotow, Spohr, Rubenstein (the 19th century one), Rezniček...
    (By the way, your group is probably nowhere near old enough to be MY grandparents.)

    The only thing I could add would be- I think it would be most interesting if you tried to sample from different eras, and not be too heavy in one particular time-span. Zelenka, anyone?
    The hardest knife ill us'd doth lose his edge. Shakespeare- Sonnet 95

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    My suggestions for 20th century would be:

    John Cage: String Quartet.
    Ellen Taaffe-Zwillich: Symphony No. 1
    David Diamond: Romeo and Juliet

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    Junior Member CampOfTheSaints's Avatar
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    Well, I'm not sure if this is what you are looking for, but these were certainly "hidden" from me for a long time, and I highly recomend them as "gems".

    Joaquin Turina, Trio for Violin, Cello, and Piano in B minor.

    Aram Khachaturian, Trio for Clarinet, Violin, and Piano.

    Camille Saint-Saens, Piano Concerto No. 5 in F Major, op. 103 "The Egyptian".

    Untill this week, I had never heard of these works, now, they are some of my favorites.
    "I can't listen to Beethoven's Appassionata Sonata too often. It makes me want to say kind and stupid things to people, and to pat them on the head. But now, in a Revolution, I must beat them on the head, and beat them without mercy."
    ~Vladimir Ilyich Lenin 1918

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    Default Thank you

    Thanks to all who have replied to this thread. I am having fun checking out your recommendations and I am sure several of them will wind up on my program!
    Denny

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    Senior Member Ephemerid's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Denny James View Post
    Thanks to all who have replied to this thread. I am having fun checking out your recommendations and I am sure several of them will wind up on my program!
    Denny
    Cool! let us know how it goes!

    ~josh
    "There is no theory. You have only to listen. Pleasure is the law.” ~ Claude Debussy

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    Senior Member Handel's Avatar
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    Frederic Ernest Fesca (1789-1826):

    Surprisingly good symphonies and orchestral music

    http://www.box.net/shared/3mcssutd6g
    At first, I discovered the wonders of classical music through the marvels of its baroque period and especially those from Mr. Handel, which explain my forum nickname. About 10 years ago, my interest leaned over classical period and Herr Haydn's production. The music bus recently drove me to the early 1800s. Where will it end?

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    Navigate TC. Interesting lists have already been delivered:

    Quote Originally Posted by Hexameron
    1. Tchaikovsky - Piano Sonata No. 3
    2. Thalberg - Fantasia on Rossini's Moise
    3. Thalberg - Grand fantasia on Beethoven's 7th
    4. Henselt - Poem d'amour Op. 3
    5. Brahms - Piano Quartet No. 1 Op. 26
    6. Mendelssohn - Piano Sonata in E major Op. 6
    7. Glazunov - The Forest symphonic poem
    8. Balakirev - Tamara symphonic poem
    9. Nicolai - The Merry Wives of Windsor overture
    10. Lortzing - The Armorer of Worms overture
    11. Reger - Fatherland overture
    12. Mozart - String Quartet K. 464 (or is this by Luchesi? )
    13. Busoni - Introduzione e Capriccio Paganini
    14. Godowsky - Passacaglia based on the first eight bars of Schubert's Unfinished Symphony
    15. Mosonyi - Funeral March for the Death of Istvan Szechenyi
    16. Chopin - Marche funebre in C minor
    17. Pixis - Fantasia dramattica on Meyerbeer's Les Huguenots
    18. Franck - Pastorale Op. 19
    19. Hummel - Piano Septet No. 1 in D minor
    20. Berlioz - King Lear overture
    21. Berlioz - Les francs-juges overture
    22. Rossini - La charite
    23. Liszt - Fantasy and Fugue on a theme of Meyerbeer
    24. Beethoven - Romance for Violin and Orchestra No. 2
    25. Alkan - Concerto for Solo Piano Op. 39
    Quote Originally Posted by Robert Newman
    1. Glazunov - 4th Symphony
    2. Ralph Vaughan Williams - 'Serenade to Music' (for Solo Singers and Orchestra)
    4. Virtually all works by Jan Dismas Zelenka (1679-1745)
    5. Prokofiev - Cantata on the 1917 Revolution
    6. Virtually all works by Andre Medtner
    7. 'Banks of Green Willow' and 'A Shropshire Lad' (orchestral) by George Butterworth
    This guy refuting the previous suggestions:
    Quote Originally Posted by Manuel
    Ralph Vaughan Williams - 'Serenade to Music' (for Solo Singers and Orchestra)
    Schumann - Violin Concerto - Come on, this is one of the most popular vc outhere
    Brahms - Piano Quartet No. 1 Op. 26
    Mozart - String Quartet K. 464 (or is this by Luchesi? )
    Godowsky - Passacaglia based on the first eight bars of Schubert's Unfinished Symphony
    Berlioz - King Lear overture
    Berlioz - Les francs-juges overture
    Beethoven - Romance for Violin and Orchestra No. 2
    Alkan - Concerto for Solo Piano Op. 39
    Brahms' string sextets - Really? They're a standard part in repertoire
    Beethoven: Cello & Piano Sonata No 3; Archduke Piano Trio
    Berlioz Roman Carnival
    Brahms Piano Solo Op 119; Piano Quintet; Clarinet Quintet
    Bruckner Symph 4 - One of the most famous symphonies, by a very well known composer
    Glazunov Violin Concerto A min - A common piece in the repertoire
    Liszt Piano Sonata B Min - - A common piece in the repertoire
    8. Mozart Symp 39 - Mozart a rare thing?
    Respighi Fountains of Rome - One of Respighi's most famous works
    Rimsky-Korsakov Russian Easter Festival Overture - Nothin to say about this, too popular
    Tchaikovsky Marche Slave - THE PROM QUEEN, probablt the most popular work ever.
    Chopin - Polonaise in C minor - Come on...
    2. Brahms - Piano Sonata no.3 (isn't it actually famous...?)
    3. Enescu - Romanian Rhapsody no.1 - You play at almost every amateur orchestra
    11. Brahms - Intermezzo no.1 - Opus number? ... It's a joke, they're part of the standard repertoire also
    And providing his own list:
    Quote Originally Posted by Manuel
    symphonies by Peterson-Berger and Draeseke
    Bacri's Une Priere
    K. A. Hartmann's violin concerto
    Bruckner chamber works (not rare, but also non standard)
    Elgar's chamber work from his early stage.
    Kabalevsky's Requiem Op72
    violin sonatas by G. L. Catoire.
    Khrennikov's violin concertos
    Tubin - Requiem for fallen soldiers, and his violin concertos
    J. O. af Sillen - 3rd symphony and violin concerto
    Atterberg - Symphonies and concertos
    Szymanowski - piano sonatas, and Metopes.
    Andriessen's organ concerto
    Kopylov - his marvelous symphony
    a few symphonies by Alberich Magnard
    Malipiero's violin concerto (even though it's a bit scratchy....)
    Quote Originally Posted by mungopark
    Anything by Saint-Georges
    Pleyel: Concerto for Clarinet in B flat major
    Krommer: Concerto for Oboe in F major, Op. 52
    Fiala: Oboe Concerto
    Mozart: Les petits riens, K Anh. 10 (299b)
    Gretry: Le huron: Overture
    Maldere: Symphony in G minor
    Clementi: Symphony no 3 in G major, Wo 34 "Great National"
    Georg Benda: Symphony in C major
    Paisiello: Piano concertos nos 2 and 4
    Andreas Jakob Romberg: Quintets (3) for Flute, Violin, 2 Violas and Cello, Op. 41
    Some guy's list is very interesting.
    Quote Originally Posted by Some Guy
    Peter Dickinson, piano concerto
    Robert Ashley, In Sara, Mencken, Christ and Beethoven There were Men and Women
    Berlioz, Benvenuto Cellini
    Janacek, Osud
    Michele Bokanowski, L'etoile d'Absinthe
    Ludger Bruemmer, Thrill
    Stravinsky, L'histoire du soldat (complete ballet)
    Gordon Mumma, Hornpipe
    Prokofiev, Semyon Kotko
    Alvin Lucier, I am sitting in a room
    Piston, Incredible Flutist (complete ballet)
    Quote Originally Posted by Oisfetz
    Borodin's first SQ
    Tchaikovsky Grand piano sonata
    Dvorak's string sextet
    Raff's string octet
    Saint-Saëns first violin sonata
    " " " " Suite Algerienne
    Enescu's first violin sonata
    Franck's SQ
    Taktakishvili's first violin concerto
    Rakov first violin concerto
    Miaskovsky violin concerto
    Medtner Epic violin sonata
    Kodaly's solo cello sonata
    Khatchaturian piano sonata
    Suk's piano pieces op.17 violin and piano
    " First SQ
    Prokofieff's SQs.
    Edouard Franck sring sextet
    Lekeu violin sonata and SQ
    Cherubini's the 6 SQs.
    Chopin's piano trio
    Rachmaninoff's cello sonata
    Fridays for SQ
    B-La-F SQ
    Birthdays SQ
    Rimsky Korsakoff's piano trio

  12. #12
    Senior Member Ephemerid's Avatar
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    Thumbs up

    (Originally Posted by Some Guy)

    Alvin Lucier, I am sitting in a room

    !! Wow, you're the only other person I know that piece-- I've heard a recording of it once last year and its a real trip!

    ~josh
    "There is no theory. You have only to listen. Pleasure is the law.” ~ Claude Debussy

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