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Thread: un poco meno mosso-Rachmaninoff

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    Post un poco meno mosso-Rachmaninoff

    What is intended by un poco meno mosso in the slow section of Rachmaninoff's Prelude in G minor, 23/5?

    It means a little less motion, but does that apply to hand motion? Or the music itself?


    Any help will be appreciated

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    Music itself

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    Hmm... Well, how do you think it is intended to be played, then?

    Liszt is a bit more concise with wordings :P

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    Senior Member BuddhaBandit's Avatar
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    It means be more gentle- the first section, if I recall correctly, is "alla marcha" or "as a march", and the right hand is fairly quick and pronounced. For meno mosso, keep everything "flowing" instead of "marching".

    An analogous example would be in Chopin's A-flat Polonaise, in the RH part that is played on top of the LH descending octaves.

    And yes, Liszt is more concise, but remember, Rachmaninoff was a virtuoso pianist, so it is natural that he is more specific and thus verbose
    Take a look at the Bandit's blog, Americana Avenue.

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    Senior Member Rachovsky's Avatar
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    Mmmm, I love his Prelude in G. I think i'm going to try and learn it next. I think the hardest part IS the Un poco meno mosso part of the piece.

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    Quote Originally Posted by BuddhaBandit View Post
    It means be more gentle- the first section, if I recall correctly, is "alla marcha" or "as a march", and the right hand is fairly quick and pronounced. For meno mosso, keep everything "flowing" instead of "marching".

    An analogous example would be in Chopin's A-flat Polonaise, in the RH part that is played on top of the LH descending octaves.

    And yes, Liszt is more concise, but remember, Rachmaninoff was a virtuoso pianist, so it is natural that he is more specific and thus verbose

    Ok, thank you.
    By piano teacher also recommended that it was also regarded how you played it; staying closer to the keyboard."

    Very helpful, I appreciate it

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    Quote Originally Posted by BuddhaBandit View Post
    It means be more gentle- the first section, if I recall correctly, is "alla marcha" or "as a march", and the right hand is fairly quick and pronounced. For meno mosso, keep everything "flowing" instead of "marching".

    An analogous example would be in Chopin's A-flat Polonaise, in the RH part that is played on top of the LH descending octaves.

    And yes, Liszt is more concise, but remember, Rachmaninoff was a virtuoso pianist, so it is natural that he is more specific and thus verbose

    Ok, thank you.
    My piano teacher also recommended that it was also regarded how you played it; staying closer to the keyboard."

    Very helpful, I appreciate it

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    Senior Member Edward Elgar's Avatar
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    The literal translation of "un poco meno mosso" is a little less movement.

    Can anyone recomend a good edition of this peice - the fingering in mine is ridiculous! There should be an easy way of playing those bass notes and chords in the march section, it's too difficult to change hand positions all the time.
    When all the paint has been dried, when all the stone has been carved, music shall remain, and we shall work with what remains.

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    Which version do you have?

    I have the complete opus 23 from Alfred, and it works for me

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    Slow down...

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    Default The sound of the piece

    I always played the piece with the emphasis on the top notes. Then I heard part of it played in a movie called "The Pianist" which was a weird, sadistic movie but when I heard this piece, I changed the way I played with and emphasis on the lower ba dee dom Dom Dom. And wow! What a beautiful difference. It really brought it to life. Hope this helps ba- de- Dom- Dom- Dom, pa, pa, pa. Quiet on the pa, pa, pa.

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    Quote Originally Posted by BuddhaBandit View Post
    And yes, Liszt is more concise, but remember, Rachmaninoff was a virtuoso pianist, so it is natural that he is more specific and thus verbose
    And Liszt WASN'T a virtuoso pianist??

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    Quote Originally Posted by fongpayman View Post
    Slow down...
    Must be a fellow Dutch man / woman

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    Senior Member Pat Fairlea's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rachovsky View Post
    Mmmm, I love his Prelude in G. I think i'm going to try and learn it next. I think the hardest part IS the Un poco meno mosso part of the piece.
    Agreed. The difficulty lies in getting the pedalling and LH articulation smooth enough to meet R' s specified meno mosso, whilst being able to transition back to the alla marcia closing section. Gorgeous piece. Donohoe's recording is particularly satisfying.

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