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Thread: Hans von Bulow

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    Default Hans von Bulow

    I have been scouring the internet looking for information about Hans von Bulow. I don't know why, but I am interested in him and how he sounded as a pianist. All I can find is that he studied under Liszt. Does anyone know anything?

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    von Bulow first met Liszt as a young man in Weimar in 1849, he found him "quite a perfect man,admirable and outstanding".
    In 1850 he saw Liszt conduct "Lohengrin" and asked him to give him lessons.He was in fact Liszt's first great pupil.
    By 1853 he was ready for concerts and also married Liszt's daughter, Cosima.She stayed with him for twelve years and then left him for Wagner.
    Through his life he cut a swathe through Europe and America terrifying and amazing people with his intellect,his temper and his sarcasm.
    As a teacher he was a holy terror.
    He insulted conductors,orchestras and audiences.
    von Bulows playing was clear,analyticaly precise and probably cold.
    Fools talk because they have to say something, wise men talk because they have something to say.

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    he was a lowlife who couldn't stand up to Wagner for taking away his wife. And not only did he not stand up to Wagner, he saved his most venomous vitriol for Bruckner, because "he didn't like Bruckner's music". Von Bulow and Hanslick were the biggest lowlives in the musical scene at the end of the 19th century, and Brahms lived vicariously through them, since they did his dirty slanderous deeds against Bruckner for him.

    Aside from that he is noted for premiering Tchaikovsky's first piano concerto, and Wagner's Meistersinger.

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    He also famously said, upon hearing the first movement of Mahler's Second Symphony played at the piano by the composer (after uncovering his ears) that it made Tristan sound like a Haydn symphony...

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    Thank you for the information, y'all.

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    Senior Member Ukko's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ScipioAfricanus View Post
    he was a lowlife who couldn't stand up to Wagner for taking away his wife. And not only did he not stand up to Wagner, he saved his most venomous vitriol for Bruckner, because "he didn't like Bruckner's music". Von Bulow and Hanslick were the biggest lowlives in the musical scene at the end of the 19th century, and Brahms lived vicariously through them, since they did his dirty slanderous deeds against Bruckner for him.

    Aside from that he is noted for premiering Tchaikovsky's first piano concerto, and Wagner's Meistersinger.
    Near as I can tell, Cosima went willingly; if she were my wife I'd be glad to see her go. Maybe throw a party.
    I spent a fortune on deodorant before I realized that people don't like me anyway.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Hilltroll72 View Post
    Near as I can tell, Cosima went willingly; if she were my wife I'd be glad to see her go. Maybe throw a party.
    I'm with you there, brother.

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    Quote Originally Posted by JohannesBrahms View Post
    I have been scouring the internet looking for information about Hans von Bulow. I don't know why, but I am interested in him and how he sounded as a pianist. All I can find is that he studied under Liszt. Does anyone know anything?
    You've been scouring the Internet looking for info on Hans von Bulow and all you have come up with is that he studied under Franz? Do you have gas-driven browser or what?

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    Quote Originally Posted by ScipioAfricanus View Post
    he was a lowlife who couldn't stand up to Wagner for taking away his wife. And not only did he not stand up to Wagner, he saved his most venomous vitriol for Bruckner, because "he didn't like Bruckner's music". Von Bulow and Hanslick were the biggest lowlives in the musical scene at the end of the 19th century, and Brahms lived vicariously through them, since they did his dirty slanderous deeds against Bruckner for him.

    Aside from that he is noted for premiering Tchaikovsky's first piano concerto, and Wagner's Meistersinger.
    I think he was extremely thankful to Wagner for doing him a favour. Still, I do agree that he should have popped one on RW's snout for the sake of form, then hand him a cheque 'behind the scenes'. What a ghastly women Cosima was.

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    Quote Originally Posted by TalkingHead View Post
    You've been scouring the Internet looking for info on Hans von Bulow and all you have come up with is that he studied under Franz? Do you have gas-driven browser or what?
    I should have clarified myself. I learned a lot about his life. I was looking for how he sounded as a pianist. The only thing I came up with was that he studied with Liszt.

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    Quote Originally Posted by TalkingHead View Post
    I think he was extremely thankful to Wagner for doing him a favour. Still, I do agree that he should have popped one on RW's snout for the sake of form, then hand him a cheque 'behind the scenes'. What a ghastly women Cosima was.
    Could you please enlighten me? What was so ghastly about her?
    ... yet for us will still remain the holy German art... (Die Meistersinger von Nürnberg)
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    I think a search by Herr von Google (or similar) will enlighten you. If not, check with other - more seasoned - luminaries on this forum. If they disappoint you, come back to me.

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    Quote Originally Posted by SiegendesLicht View Post
    Could you please enlighten me? What was so ghastly about her?
    She did not exactly cover herself in glory during her tenure running the Bayreuth festival following Richard's death.

    Here are a few details.

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    Quote Originally Posted by JohannesBrahms View Post
    I should have clarified myself. I learned a lot about his life. I was looking for how he sounded as a pianist. The only thing I came up with was that he studied with Liszt.
    I mentioned a description of his playing in my post above.
    There is a piano roll recording of him playing one of his own polkas on You Tube.
    The Edison company did record him but the recordings have not been found.
    Fools talk because they have to say something, wise men talk because they have something to say.

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    Quote Originally Posted by moody View Post
    I mentioned a description of his playing in my post above.
    There is a piano roll recording of him playing one of his own polkas on You Tube.
    The Edison company did record him but the recordings have not been found.
    Thank you. I had no idea he was recorded. Its too bad they haven't found the recordings. If they did, there is a good chance they would sound like the recording of Brahms.

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