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Thread: What digital piano to get?

  1. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kontrapunctus View Post
    When I progress a bit more, I plan to buy a Yamaha CLP 545. It might be overkill for an amateur, but I think it's false economy to buy cheap then replace it. Of course, I'd prefer a nice acoustic upright piano, but we don't have the wall space for one, and the 545's footprint is no greater than my current Casio/stand in my office. (A digital piano needs open space for the sound, unlike an acoustic upright.)
    We had the same problem in our new house, where we wanted to put a piano there was no wall space for an upright. It might seem an odd solution, but when I actually got a piano it was a Baldwin model R Grand, it didn't need wall space and I was careful to have it set just far enough out from the wall (windows) that you could get around it.

    PS, my 5 year old granddaughter likes to crawl under it and use it as a hideout. Before we got the Baldwin we had a Sohmer model 57 and she had some of her toys under that one.

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  3. #17
    Senior Member Oliver's Avatar
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    Good choice, I recently got the P115 to take to and from university. Was tempted to get the P255 but it's too expensive.

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    Senior Member pianississimo's Avatar
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    I've played a few Yamahas in shops and like them.
    I have a Casio Privea PX130 which I bought because it has 128 polyphony and good weighted keys. I didn't want to pay for a lot of special extra features. I wanted something that sounds like a piano and feels good to play.

    I played a Kawai once too and was very impressed with the natural feel of the keys and the big rich sound. Sadly I didn't make a note of the model.

    When mine eventually wears out I might splash out on something a bit more fancy. I bought this one as a complete beginner not knowing for sure that I'd stick to it. Now it's obvious that I am a total pianophile I would be tempted to splash out.
    I'd love to get an acoustic piano but my neighbours are unlikely to enjoy scales practice at 5 in the morning quite as much as I do!!

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  7. #19
    Senior Member DeepR's Avatar
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    I have a Roland HP-505 and I'm quite happy with it. It serves its purpose and I'm not going to spend more money on a digital.

    Lately I've been listening to a lot of demos from many different software pianos and some of those sound really good. Check out the Garritan CFX Concert Grand. Probably one of the best sampled piano's available right now.
    There's also Pianoteq, a software modelled piano. It's impressive and they're getting better, but if you ask me it still sounds too "plastic" compared to the best sampled pianos.

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  9. #20
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    If I stay with the piano, I plan to buy a Yamaha CLP 545. I don't have enough wall space for it to be placed against a wall, so would it sound OK if it's the center of the room?


  10. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kontrapunctus View Post
    If I stay with the piano, I plan to buy a Yamaha CLP 545. I don't have enough wall space for it to be placed against a wall, so would it sound OK if it's the center of the room?

    Since it's a digital piano the sound comes through speakers rather than a sound board, so where it sits in the room isn't going to make a lot of difference. With an acoustic piano the wall enters into the equation of sound, but a digital doesn't depend on the wall to effect the sound.

  11. #22
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    That's what I figured--thanks!

  12. #23
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    Actually, I think my wife and I have figured out a place for it in the living room, so an acoustic piano is in the works. I'm aiming for a new Yamaha B3 or a used Yamaha U3. (I don't want to buy a cheapie then replace in a year or two.)

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  14. #24
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    I think Yamaha DGX650B Digital Piano is one of the best digital piano on the market . You can easily connect your music device to this piano with the use of the auxiliary input port and the sound will come out of the digital piano’s speakers. This is great for when you want to play along to a pre-recorded track at the same volume as the piano.

    You can enjoy the unrivalled performance as this digital piano offers 128-note polyphony. This offers enough power for the sound not to cut out, even when you are playing with two hands and laying multiple voices over one another.

    An acoustic piano would give a heavier touch for the lower notes and for the higher notes, you’ll need a lighter touch. This digital piano is very similar to an acoustic in that respect as it is the same case for the Yamaha DGX650B Digital Piano.

  15. #25
    Senior Member LarryShone's Avatar
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    For the money you can do a lot better than that DGX which doesn't appear to have a pedal and only has 128 note polyphony-most have 256 or higher now. Better off with one of Yamaha's P series or even a Casio CDP130, which does have a pedal. Not sure if it supports half pedalling though, but my Casio Celviano does.
    I'm playing the right notes, but not necessarily in the right order!

  16. #26
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    I have the entry level Yamaha P45. All this stuff has high tariffs where I live, so it's the same price here as the next model up in the States.

    I can definitely see myself upgrading at some point, but for now it's doing the trick, especially with a cat running around the house and the possibility of kids and dogs in the near future. I'd really like to upgrade to an upright piano, but I also want to perform. There are low-pressure opportunities to perform in my town (restaurants and stuff), but I'd definitely need to bring my own gear.

  17. #27
    Senior Member Captainnumber36's Avatar
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    I love my P85, it was great when I was in bands since I could carry it myself. My first keyboard was a p200 which had great sound, but I always needed someone to help me move it. The p200 is what I used in most of my band days. Now that I play solo, and perform primarily in nursing homes, they usually have a piano to perform on already so I don't need my keyboard.
    Last edited by Captainnumber36; Jul-20-2017 at 02:42.

  18. #28
    Senior Member Captainnumber36's Avatar
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    As far as pianos go, I love my upright Baldwin piano. I've had it since I was about 3 and it still plays great.

  19. #29
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    If you are looking digital piano in the marketing? Yamahas Arius is known as piano synthesizer, portable piano, weighted keyboard or is a modern electronic musical instrument.

    In this piano, three basic categories of keyboard instruments available. The largest and most expensive, and also the best when it comes to developing piano skills, are the acoustic pianos. There are also many good digital pianos, which are smaller, less expensive, and do a decent job of mimicking the sound and feel of an acoustic instrument. A third category, the electronic keyboard, is the least expensive option, but an electronic keyboard may not have the right touch to develop hand strength for a beginning pianist, or enough keys to play a wide range of music.

    To purchase this piano, it is available in affordable prices in the market.

  20. #30
    Senior Member Rossiniano's Avatar
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    A while back I went with the Kawai CL 35 as offering much more options and offering better sound when compared to more expensive Yamaha Clavinovas. It has since been replaced with the CN 37, which while looking a bit more stylish, has poorer ergonomics and did not sound as natural to my ears... at least the piano selections did not. The harpsichord sounded a bit mellower and was a slight improvement, but I still preferred the 35 overall. As mentioned, for some reason I was not overly impressed with what the Yamaha offered when price was figured into the equation. However, if actively looking today I would more carefully explore the differences regarding what models both brands offer in my price category (the only brands conveniently available in my area) given that I was not overly impressed with the newest version of the Kawai.

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