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Thread: Tell us about your instrument!

  1. #1
    Senior Member Ravndal's Avatar
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    Default Tell us about your instrument!

    I have a brown "Riese" piano. It's German, and really old, and really worn out. I'm trying to give it away atm, since I'm moving to south-Norway to study at the conservatory. But I'm afraid i have to dump it

    Looking forward to practice at some "real" instruments.

    So, what kind of keyboard do you have? Satisfied?
    "That as s."

    - Mark Twain

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    Sr. Moderator Taggart's Avatar
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    Zender piano.

    Zender-keys.jpg

    A small 85 note beast. Described as good for beginners. Holds tune reasonably well. Nice tone. Satisfied at the minute but if I get any better I may outrun it. Still a very nice starter piano.
    Music begins where words leave off. Music expresses the inexpressible.

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    Senior Member Ravndal's Avatar
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    Did you buy it used or new?
    "That as s."

    - Mark Twain

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    Sr. Moderator Taggart's Avatar
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    Used from a local music shop.
    Music begins where words leave off. Music expresses the inexpressible.

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    Senior Member Skilmarilion's Avatar
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    I've been fortunate enough to have a Yamaha Clavinova for over 10 years now. Maybe I'll upgrade to an acoustic one day, but it really offers so many possibilities (recording, transposing, etc.) and its performance is fantastic.

    30448-yamaha-clavinova-clp240-rosewood--large.jpg

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    Senior Member PetrB's Avatar
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    I don't have an instrument, but a very serviceable (and work-horse, knock on wood, as far as longevity and durability) Yamaha digital studio model clavinova, of, um, a certain age. 88 weighted keys, touch sensitive, as pictured above, three set in place pedals.

    It is a tool, not an instrument.

    In the past, I've had very decent uprights, full, or studio height, and one vintage grand, all quite good, which gave much use.

    The best pianos I've played were "out" - in teacher's studios and performing venues.

    Looking forward, though, eventually, to another acoustic real instrument.
    Last edited by PetrB; Jun-20-2013 at 02:47. Reason: sp.

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    Senior Member PetrB's Avatar
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    A word to the wise, and practical advice at that. If purchasing an upright, never consider less than a studio height instrument, ca. 38 or 40 inches high, as a minimum standard. Anything less, the cross stringing, the jammed space for the action, is all formulaic for disappointment, bad quality sound, bad touch, short life (especially if you are really practicing) and they go out of tune before your tuner has left the room -- not even an 'investment' in any terms.

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    Senior Member hreichgott's Avatar
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    IMG_0118.JPG
    Cable Nelson 5'2" baby grand from early 20th century.

    When I bought it, I had been pining after a certain well-seasoned used 7' Yamaha in good condition, but I didn't have $15,000. The Cable Nelson came along at significantly less than its actual value due to an odd series of circumstances and I snapped it up.

    It is a cheerful piano, capable also of high drama. Attractive to a Haydn/Mozart fan like myself. Not a huge variety of tone colors, but enough. A little bit of quirky extra play in the keys before you get in touch with the hammer. Not particularly good at subtlety. I have named him Cherubino.
    Heather W. Reichgott, piano
    http://heatherwreichgott.blogspot.com

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    Senior Member hreichgott's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by PetrB View Post
    Looking forward, though, eventually, to another acoustic real instrument.
    PetrB, loving piano music as you do, yes, you do need a real instrument!
    Heather W. Reichgott, piano
    http://heatherwreichgott.blogspot.com

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    Senior Member PetrB's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by hreichgott View Post
    PetrB, loving piano music as you do, yes, you do need a real instrument!
    ...and if I want to be more motivated to keep what I've got and maybe resurrect what used to be in hand and at hand, even in part :-)

    The best and newest of the digitals are pretty remarkable, but virtual is not real, and there is a world of difference.

    Never accept substitutes, and when it comes to purchasing any tool or musical instrument, Caveat emptor.

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    My Bechstein model A190 is hands down one of the best pianos I've ever played. Amazing sound.


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    Senior Member Klavierspieler's Avatar
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    I have a 2005 Fandrich & Sons. Excellent instrument.

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    Senior Member Rehydration's Avatar
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    I've got an Everett console piano. Not sure what model, but it's served me well.
    "I won't ever throw rose petals out my car window."
    --Paraphrased from The Secret Life of Bees by Sue Monk Kidd

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    Senior Member Novelette's Avatar
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    Both of my pianos were made by Story & Clark.

    Both instruments have their own strengths and drawbacks.

    The upright is a very good piano for works that call for a very clear and precise sound to them. It is perfectly suited to Mozart, Haydn, Bach, etc. whose works I would say require very clean, detached sounds. The keys are perfectly proportioned in all three dimensions; the bass is muscular but not overpowering, and the treble is bright and clear. I use this piano strictly for practicing, thus, I play it the most.

    The baby grand is 5'8", also by Story & Clark: it has a very powerful sound, but despite a great deal of work put into it, it lacks the quick precision of the upright. It is approximately 85 years old, and the black keys definitely show the usage. The black keys' edges have blunted considerably, which makes it easy for fingers to slip off the key if it isn't touched in exactly the right place; the bass can be thunderous if not played with a very gentle touch. Still, the whole piano produces a beautiful, singing tone and is quite a joy to play. Liszt, Schumann, and Brahms sound better on this piano than on the upright.

    It frequently happens that I will go a whole week without playing the baby grand, especially when I'm learning a new piece.
    Last edited by Novelette; Jun-27-2013 at 00:20. Reason: Typos

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    Member aszkid's Avatar
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    A 7 months old Yamaha P35, does the job for a begginer like me. Damn, it even has two harpsichord and organ sounds!
    Last edited by aszkid; Jun-29-2013 at 22:55.

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