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Thread: Favorite ballet?

  1. #256
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dimace View Post
    Die Polowetzer Tänze from Borodin's Prince Igor acts as a small ballet in the famous Russian opera. It lasts about 12 minutes and sometimes we can attended it as a stand alone event. The oriental character of the dances and singing, combined with the lucrative tradition of the Russian Ballet, make this dual- character instant something special in music history. Here is my favorite performance.

    Hands down I gotta agree with you Dimace, Borodin's Prince Igor is truly my all time favorite. The palpable energy seen in that incredible Polovtsian dance sequence was/is truly electric!!! For a while Bizet's Carmen and Jules Massenet's Manon Lescaut were my top favorites, but their seductive sensual energies simply can not compete with Borodin's engaging masterpiece.

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  3. #257
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    CINDERELLA! Wish the Matthew Bourne version would come to the US.

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  5. #258
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    Green Table by Kurt Joos.

  6. #259
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    Quote Originally Posted by jegreenwood View Post
    Or sometimes it just depends on who shows up for class. From an article in the New Yorker:

    People may disagree over which of George Balanchine’s ballets is the greatest, but I don’t think there’s much contest over which one they feel the most tenderly toward. That would be “Serenade” (1934), set to Tchaikovsky’s Serenade for Strings, the first ballet Balanchine made in America. The piece is beautiful—stirring, sweeping—and at the same time a little odd. The heroine seems to die at the end, but you’re not quite sure.

    Whether spectators know it or not, this ballet is also about what it’s like to have nothing. When Balanchine arrived in America, in 1933, his homeland was far behind him; he had escaped from Russia in 1924. He couldn’t really go back to Europe, either. (Hitler became Chancellor of Germany in 1933.) And what had he come to? He was a ballet choreographer, and almost nobody in the United States could dance ballet. Most Americans didn’t know what a ballet was. He didn’t have a company. He opened a school, but to judge from the photos the young women he was able to collect were mostly rather plump and bewildered. When he set out to make a ballet on them—“Serenade”—seventeen girls came to the first rehearsal, but only nine turned up at the second, and six at the third. So he made the opening tableau—a ravishing sight, people still gasp—for seventeen.Bluestacks Kodi Lucky Patcher Then he made a section for nine, then one for six. When a girl fell, he put that in. When another showed up late, he added that. He made no soloist roles, because he had no one who could handle soloist-level choreography.

    To be clear - it's changed a lot since then
    .
    Yes and the hero will die at the end

  7. #260
    Junior Member Moriarty's Avatar
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    Swan Lake of Tchaikovsky.

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    The Nutcracker is one of the compositions I just can't get bored of, so that's my pick.
    Last edited by Clouds Weep Snowflakes; Feb-28-2019 at 00:10.

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    Agon and Apollo! Stravinsky rules.

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    Senior Member millionrainbows's Avatar
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    Rite of Spring, and Jeux.

  12. #264
    Senior Member jegreenwood's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Agamenon View Post
    Agon and Apollo! Stravinsky rules.
    And Balanchine!

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    Carmen- Rodion Schedrin (his wife was the prima ballerina Maya Plisetskya)

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    Senior Member Fritz Kobus's Avatar
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    I don't know many ballets. I recently saw The Nutcracker and enjoyed it immensely, but apart from a live performance, I will mostly take my ballet as interludes in operas. The Russians seem to do those ballet interludes the most.
    Last edited by Fritz Kobus; Jan-17-2020 at 04:09.
    "Life is too short to spend it wandering in the barren Sahara of musical trash."
    --Sergei Vasilyevich Rachmaninoff

  15. #267
    Senior Member Becca's Avatar
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    Actually it was the French who did it the most as the patrons of the Paris Opéra during the 19th century expected that all operas would contain a ballet sequence. Even Verdi had to add one to Don Carlos for the French version.

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  17. #268
    Senior Member Fritz Kobus's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Becca View Post
    Actually it was the French who did it the most as the patrons of the Paris Opéra during the 19th century expected that all operas would contain a ballet sequence. Even Verdi had to add one to Don Carlos for the French version.
    Of course. I would not have realized that, since French opera does not go high on my list, though I have a few. Saint-Saens has a nice ballet section in Henry VIII.
    Last edited by Fritz Kobus; Jan-17-2020 at 05:30.
    "Life is too short to spend it wandering in the barren Sahara of musical trash."
    --Sergei Vasilyevich Rachmaninoff

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    Senior Member Rogerx's Avatar
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    Romeo and Juliet | William Bracewell, Francesca Hayward | The Royal Ballet | Trailer 2019
    I can highly recommend this Royal Ballet production of R&J.
    Shown on BBC2 New Years Day
    “Never argue with an idiot. They will drag you down to their level and beat you with experience.” ― Mark Twain

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