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Thread: Favorite ballet?

  1. #61
    Senior Member The nose's Avatar
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    Stravinsky's Sacre du printemps in Nijinsky original choreography, but i recently watched a representation of Béjart's choreography and it's good too.

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  3. #62
    Senior Member Marschallin Blair's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dholling View Post
    My favorites:

    Glazunov: Raymonda & The Seasons
    Tchaikovsky: Sleeping Beauty
    Nosyrev: Song of Triumphant Love
    Ravel: Daphnis et Chloe
    Dukas: La Peri
    Nikolai Tcherepnin: Echo et Narcisse
    Delibes: Sylvia
    Offenbach: Le Papillon
    Massenet: Le Carillon
    Bartok: The Wooden Prince
    Stravinsky: The Firebird & Petrushka
    Khrennikov: Napoleon Bonaparte
    Boris Asafiev: Flames of Paris
    Shchedrin: Anna Karenina
    Murad Kazhlayev: Gorianka (Maiden of the Mountains)
    Khachaturian: Spartacus
    Rossini (arr. Respighi): La Boutique Fantasque
    Leevi Madetoja: Okon Fuoko
    Rimsky-Korsakov: Mlada (opera-ballet)
    I like that Daphne's in there.

  4. #63
    Senior Member Marschallin Blair's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rackon View Post
    Do any folks who named musical favoritesevenings actually care for dancing? I took the original post to mean one's favorite "ballet", not one's favorite ballet score.
    Ha. Ha. Ha. . . touche. . . fair shooting.

    You want to talke the chocolate ganache of Nijinsky, Karsavina, and Fokine-- and you get the sourdough pretzels of the scores to Le Sacre and Daphne. . . Ha. Ha. Ha.

    Mutatis mutandis, for me; but for the music.

  5. #64
    Senior Member Marschallin Blair's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Celesta View Post
    I'm a passionate balletomane and it's tough to pick just one score as a favorite. Tchaikovsky comes to mind immediately. He completely revolutionized the genre and demonstrated that ballet music was a form to be taken seriously. Swan Lake and The Nutcracker are masterpieces of melody, orchestration, story telling and "danceability". But IMO The Sleeping Beauty is in a class by itself. It's 3 hours of gorgeous narrative dance music. I attended dozens of his ballet performances and the way his music comes to life with an orchestra playing live and dancers onstage moving to his music is extraordinary.

    Prokofiev's ballets are great too. Romeo & Juliet I think is his magnum opus. The score's dramatic and lyric power bowls one over. Cinderella is a beautiful score but differs from R&J in that Prokofiev fits the score into classical dance forms: pas de deux, variations, waltzes, etc. Cinderella is arguably Prokofiev's homage to Tchaikovsky.

    Other great ballet scores are Stravinsky's Firebird, Petrushka and Apollo and Ravel's stunning Daphnis & Chloe.
    <Ping!>. . . . . . . . <Ping!>. . . . <Ping!>. . . <Ping!>. . <Ping!> <P-p-p-p-p-p-p-p-p-p-i-i-i-i-i-ng!> (factorial). . .

    Lovely all.

  6. #65
    Senior Member Marschallin Blair's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by leomarillier View Post
    Ok, now his is a tough question. Because ballet music covers, always under the same name of ballet music, more than 350 years, including Lully, Rameau, and other French composers at the cour du roi, the romantic (not only Delibes, Lakmé, Tchaikovsky, but also Beethoven-a good Prometheus music if you ask me!-, the fruitious early 20th, and the modern (Glass, notably).
    I luckily had the opportunity to attend a performance of Les Siècles, a wonderful french orchestra, during the summit of the Radio Festival in Montpellier. They played the usual Rameau Indes Galantes Suite, Lully as well, Delibes, Lakmé, and the Rite of Spring. I was quite thrilled by Rameau, and I had the confirmation that Romantic ballet, at least the popular one, is just, musically speaking, sweeties and ruins of delicatessen from a wonderful era. Of course, the Rite is more mind-crushing than any other musical piece - still to this say!-, but in terms of musical beauty, choregraphic poetry, public acceptance, and yet modernity and shivering light, the Firebird seems pretty hard to beat, and Prokofiev's Suite Scythe comes close with those criteras. I know, musically speaking, it's almost Haydn, put together even with Pétrouchka. But the stylistic and formal "gaps" of the Russian Tradition, including Rimsky's heavy basses and codas, are here transcendented by orchestral variety, an attention not to musical form but to the story! Not a "dumbening" ABA form...

    But if there is something even greater than this, It's Debussy's Jeux.
    Musically, a storm, it does not have the structural and popular appeal of Images, the assumed colorism of Nocturnes, but shares images with Pélléas, it does not have the comfort of La Mer, works and grows by exaltant convulsions. The height of Debussy's genius, modernism, even in the "drama"; no musical rule is here "applicable" (formally quite obviously, but in the little melodic shapes, even the orchestration, Debussy goes WILD and almost INSANE). Plus, the argument is... Well you know, it's one of those little stories, almost anecdotes, that makes the listening of the music absolutely delicious, like Cosi Fan Tutte. "The scene is a garden at dusk; a tennis ball has been lost; a boy and two girls are searching for it. The artificial light of the large electric lamps shedding fantastic rays about them suggests the idea of childish games: they play hide and seek, they try to catch one another, they quarrel, they sulk without cause. The night is warm, the sky is bathed in pale light; they embrace. But the spell is broken by another tennis ball thrown in mischievously by an unknown hand. Surprised and alarmed, the boy and girls disappear into the nocturnal depths of the garden."
    The argument is "nothing", everything is about the mood, the atmosphere, a Turner of the tennis court, just three people, and mysteries surrounding, themselves lost ina city. There is no sacrifice, nor a devil to destroy, just an anecdote that could happen to everyone. And at the same time, a vast quantity of images is offered to us. Van Goghian modern images, some kind of non-mystical (but mist-ical!), subtle erotism that everyone can experience, here the flirting of Pélléas an Mélisande seems less exclusive but as orgasmic. Plus, some ideas are really what Debussy was into, generally speaking! A new type of light, a new type of darkness, of night, and yet images of love are here: the moon bathed, embraced by the coulds, lonely lovers surrounded by civilization, still, blessed by the moon (or is it an electric light?^^). And, for Debussy, this is the ultimate Ode to a new time, when, as the nights are lit up by man, and consequently days are not days anymore, love and attraction is to be found and expressed through little gestures, not in "special" moments, not in the middle of a lonely dark night where the lovers, unable to seeing each other, swear solemnly their undying love for half an hour (don't get me wrong, I love Tristan and Isolde), and flirt is now a pleasure to create, seems to be a special sign of attention between those people.
    These three people, in the argument of the ballet, are friends. They're young and beautiful.



    Let the Games begin.
    A. . . well-thought out and 'sustained' response: bravo!

  7. #66
    Senior Member Orfeo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Marschallin Blair View Post
    I like that Daphne's in there.
    Cool! You should try the Nosyrev and Tcherepnin ballets if you haven't already.
    David A. Hollingsworth (dholling)

    ~All good art is about something deeper than it admits.
    Roger Ebert

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  9. #67
    Senior Member Eviticus's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Marschallin Blair View Post
    <Ping!>. . . . . . . . <Ping!>. . . . <Ping!>. . . <Ping!>. . <Ping!> <P-p-p-p-p-p-p-p-p-p-i-i-i-i-i-ng!> (factorial). . .

    Lovely all.
    Another ping from me... assuming the 'ping' is the pretty sound of the celesta hitting the right notes.

  10. #68
    Senior Member mirepoix's Avatar
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    I haven't managed to attend a ballet yet, but it's something I'll definitely do. I haven't even seen very many. Of those I've watched my favourite so far is a MacMillan Production of Romeo and Juliet. I believe a huge part of that is because I love Prokofiev's music.

  11. #69
    Senior Member Haydn man's Avatar
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    My wife is the ballet fan in our house and she says The Nutcracker gets her vote, apparently because 'it just does'
    Then she added 'that's so far' so the lady may exercise her option to change her mind!

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  13. #70
    Senior Member Marschallin Blair's Avatar
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    My wife is the ballet fan in our house and she says The Nutcracker gets her vote, apparently because 'it just does'Then she added 'that's so far' so the lady may exercise her option to change her mind!

    fire.jpg

    -- Then blow her away with a Diaghilev-staged version of the Firebird.

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  15. #71
    Senior Member Marschallin Blair's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by The nose View Post
    Stravinsky's Sacre du printemps in Nijinsky original choreography, but i recently watched a representation of Béjart's choreography and it's good too.
    coco i.jpg

    Seen this?-- I got it just for the beautifully-recreated opening scene of the film at the première of Le Sacre at the Théâtre des Champs-Élysées ; but not for the insipid drama between Stravinksy and Channel. Ha. Ha. Ha.

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  17. #72
    Senior Member Haydn man's Avatar
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    Thanks for that recommendation
    I will have to get that for her

  18. #73
    Senior Member Levanda's Avatar
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    Just for interest Russian ballet so popular, how about African or Arabic ballets?



    Levanda

  19. #74
    Senior Member Whistler Fred's Avatar
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    Nutcracker tops my (rather large) list, for both musical and personal reasons. I grew up with the Nutcracker (Tchaikovsky was one of my mom's favorite composers), and we made several trips to see the Joffrey Ballet performance of it during the holiday season. So I have all sorts of warm associations with the music and the ballet. And the music itself is wonderful!
    Last edited by Whistler Fred; Feb-08-2014 at 16:32.

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  21. #75
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    My answer is, alas, not in any way original: Swan Lake. My most favorite ballet of them all, for me better than even the fantastic Nutcracker. I practically grew up on Tchaikovsky's ballets... And though I'm now a devoted opera fan, I'm still jumping at any chance to see them.

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