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Thread: Luigi Boccherini

  1. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by ComposerOfAvantGarde View Post
    But by far CPE Bach was the best.
    Seems like a sweeping statement from someone who's never even listened to Boccherini's String Quintets and Quartets which form the heart of his output. Don't get me wrong, CPE's great stuff, but it does sound like you're jumping the gun a bit here.

    Lukecash12 wrote:

    Yes, he was more of a rococco composer, methinks. Roccoco has to be in my top three favorite periods, considering we got imaginative fellows like Scarlatti and Couperin from it.
    Leaving aside the rather dubious notion of a Roccoco in music, the distinction between Galante and Classical seems to be a pretty thorny one. As some would have it now the idea that the 'transitional period' of the Galante actually lasts much longer than the Classical and encompasses an immensely wide variety of styles. Do people really think that Boccherini sounds more like Telemann, Vivaldi and Heinichen than like Mozart or Haydn?

    The thing is that the ideas that underpinned the Galante of Vivaldi and Heinichen are what went on to actually be Classicism. However, and I suspect this is more to do with assumptions and received wisdom, the notion that anything beforehand that doesn't sound exactly like Haydn and Mozart is 'transitional' is an illusion based on the, possibly erroneous, belief that they epitomize Classicism. As long as we don't look at the ideas that characterize Classicism, looking instead at a couple of composers who we accept as given as 'being Classical', then we're going to continue having a very hazy notion of what the Galante is and an extraordinarily limited and narrow understanding of Classicism itself.

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    Senior Member Ingélou's Avatar
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    Too late now - must read this fascinating thread tomorrow. But I'd like to say that I have only recently discovered Boccherini (after fiddling away at the 'infamous minuet') & that he is fabulous! I love classical guitar. I look forward to sampling some of the music suggested by you lovely TC posters above.
    Night night
    ~ Mollie ~
    My fiddle my joy.

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  5. #48
    Senior Member Mesa's Avatar
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    I always enjoy the often sad tale of the one movement wonder.
    You're a crazy, penniless lobster doctor. No combination of you should be a comedian.

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    Senior Member Ingélou's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Boccherini View Post
    New releases:



    Sonatas for Violin and Keyboard Op. 5 (Nos. 1-6; Gs 25-30); Jacques Ogg, Harpsichord; Emilio Moreno, Violin.



    Six sonatas for Cello and Piano (Gs 1, 4-6, 10 and 13); Fedor Amosov, Cello; Jen-Ru Sun, Piano. Re-arranged by the cellist Alfredo Piatti, and unfortunately not HIP.
    Worth finding these for the covers alone...!

    Good morning, everyone; this thread is as good as I'd hoped. Thank you...
    ~ Mollie ~
    My fiddle my joy.

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    Senior Member Dustin's Avatar
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    MI0002913154.jpg

    I continue to be stunned by how melodic and joyous this guy's work is. I've known about him for a bit but he's growing more and more on me. I LOVE this album above. I'm not going to go as far as to say some of Boccherini's quintets are as technically good or profound as some of Mozart's music, but for sheer listening enjoyment, Boccherini matches him at times.
    Last edited by Dustin; Nov-13-2013 at 02:57.

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    Senior Member clavichorder's Avatar
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    Boccherini is turning into a new composer I'd like to explore more. His works have a lot of imagination and color; definitely not like anyone else's. I'm particularly thinking of the string quintets, as I'm not as interested in his symphonies. This work comes up high in youtube searches of Boccherini String Quintets and I think its a very interesting and charming work. You can't say he develops themes and treats them with an economical sort of discipline like Haydn and sometimes he scarce has a theme, but whatever it is he does is interesting and unique.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PqcF...k&spfreload=10

    There are a lot of string quintets. I think Boccherini could be another one of those names like CPE Bach that really deserves recognition once we get past paying out dues to Mozart, Haydn and Beethoven.

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  12. #52
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dustin View Post
    MI0002913154.jpg

    I continue to be stunned by how melodic and joyous this guy's work is. I've known about him for a bit but he's growing more and more on me. I LOVE this album above. I'm not going to go as far as to say some of Boccherini's quintets are as technically good or profound as some of Mozart's music, but for sheer listening enjoyment, Boccherini matches him at times.
    Maybe like Haydn. Enjoyable sometimes without ever being as profound as Mozart. Haydn pioneered new forms and hence he has a status which Boccherini lacks.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mandryka View Post
    Maybe like Haydn. Enjoyable sometimes without ever being as profound as Mozart. Haydn pioneered new forms and hence he has a status which Boccherini lacks.
    Haydn, to me, is one of the most profound composers. I never get the 'he's not as profound as Mozart' comment - also, I think Boccherini was well capable of making profound music. His quintets have some really good material in them, imo. His symphonies were pretty good as well and I think he was a very good person in real life. Some of his comments about music are very interesting.

    I generally listen to more Haydn, but I'll need to look into Boccherini's music in more detail, he definitely deserves recognition.
    Last edited by HaydnBearstheClock; Mar-05-2015 at 22:32.

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    I'd love some more Boccherini recommendations. Any favorite recordings? Any particularly famous ones?

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    Senior Member Ingélou's Avatar
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    Back again on here, after finding one of my favourite YouTube Boccherini pieces - Jordi Savall's version of La Musica Notturna delle Strade di Madrid - Op. 30 n. 6 (G. 324).



    I really do think Boccherini is underrated - many people don't look past the minuet, which is often sneered at, like Wordsworth's Daffodils, but both are so clever and sparkling.
    Last edited by Ingélou; Jan-11-2019 at 17:57.
    ~ Mollie ~
    My fiddle my joy.

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  19. #56
    Senior Member Ingélou's Avatar
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    And this version of his Fandango is full of verve, and wonderful to watch.

    ~ Mollie ~
    My fiddle my joy.

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    Been listening to an album of Boccherini's string quintets from the great Fabio Biondi/Europa Galante lately, and I'm really pleasantly surprised. The guy was a great writer of melodies, and there's some harmonies that strike me as ahead of their time. There's a major theme here in the first movement that seems to have a major 7th feel and it's really strange considering the era in which it was written:



    Definitely pleasantly surprised. I was reading a thread here in which someone was saying Boccherini's quintets put Mozart's to shame, and while I don't know about that, they are definitely better than what I was expecting. I'll be looking into his music more for sure.

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