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Thread: What piece makes you cry instantly?

  1. #91
    Senior Member millionrainbows's Avatar
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    This is a guilty admission, but this, by Jerry Goldsmith:

    https://youtu.be/c0JSInt1xHo


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    Senior Member millionrainbows's Avatar
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    Senior Member DeepR's Avatar
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    For a time it was Scriabin's Sonata No. 3, movement 3.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i39dyE2bXbo

    I got to know this piece during the time when I was deeply in love with the love of my life and things got so intertwined that each and every time I played this movement I couldn't keep it dry.
    It sounds a bit silly in hindsight, but at the time it was extremely powerful. I was in a different, heightened emotional state from being so madly in love, which has been a once in a lifetime experience for me.
    Everything I felt back then, from endless longing, to this perfect sweet spot between deep melancholy and pure happiness, it was all there or brought up by this piece of music. I can't possibly "reproduce" that feeling now, but it's still a great piece of music regardless.
    Last edited by DeepR; Jun-18-2019 at 23:51.

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    Senior Member 13hm13's Avatar
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    Sometimes it's just one touching note that puts a tickle in the eye ... in the 1st mvt. of Walton's VC, can you guess WHEN it happens? (HINT: listen and watch maestro Nelsons)


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    Senior Member Rogerx's Avatar
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    Régine Crespin singing "Absence" from "Les Nuits d'Été"
    I can hear the whole piece without crying, but just this song.....

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    Senior Member Open Book's Avatar
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    This, from the opening bars ...It's meltingly beautiful.

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    Senior Member millionrainbows's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rogerx View Post

    Régine Crespin singing "Absence" from "Les Nuits d'Été"
    I can hear the whole piece without crying, but just this song.....
    This is based all on her singing, not the harmonic progression of the music, which is rather straightforward.
    WHEREAS the "Poltergeist" example is more based on harmonic progression and melody, although those children's voices are touching.

    So, what kind of a "cryer" are you? Are you more affected by, say, a single element such as a voice or violin, or more affected by the overall harmonic/melodic information?

    Also, I noticed that after my mother died, I was more easily affected by the female voice. Is this generally true of all opera fans? Did their mothers die?
    Last edited by millionrainbows; Jun-19-2019 at 16:07.

  9. #98
    Senior Member Open Book's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 13hm13 View Post
    Sometimes it's just one touching note that puts a tickle in the eye ... in the 1st mvt. of Walton's VC, can you guess WHEN it happens? (HINT: listen and watch maestro Nelsons)

    Is Maestro Nelsons crying when it happens?

    Please give us a clue, a time stamp.

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    Senior Member Open Book's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by millionrainbows View Post
    This is based all on her singing, not the harmonic progression of the music, which is rather straightforward.
    WHEREAS the "Poltergeist" example is more based on harmonic progression and melody, although those children's voices are touching.

    So, what kind of a "cryer" are you? Are you more affected by, say, a single element such as a voice or violin, or more affected by the overall harmonic/melodic information?
    I sure would like to know if there is anything common among all the music that brings on the tears or the feeling of tears. I'm not musically literate so I can't say, It's this key or that chord, or whatever construct was employed. It would be interesting if they were related in some way.

    Sometimes it'a a phrase that gets you going. Sometimes it happens when a piece finally ends and you realize how moved you've been by the whole experience and have trouble letting it go.

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    Senior Member CypressWillow's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dorsetmike View Post
    Purcell Dido's lament

    Wow! Piercingly gorgeous. Thank you for this.
    I went to Warsaw for the first time in October 1985 (the International Chopin Competition.) It was my first time behind the "Iron Curtain" and I was mildly freaked by the presence of police/military types with enormous rifles on the tarmac as we deplaned. It distracted me from a celebrity who was walking to the terminal at the same time: a tall lady, glamorous, with a flowing cape and a regal presence. It was only inside the terminal that I realized it was Jessye Norman! Good thing she was gone by then, whisked away for VIP treatment, or I'd have begged for an autograph in the most fawning manner imaginable.
    Last edited by CypressWillow; Jun-20-2019 at 00:26. Reason: typo
    "If I follow the dictates of my government, I will be violating the dictates of my god."
    -Chiune Sugihara

    "Were my Maker to grant me but a single glance through these sightless eyes of mine, I would, without question or recall, choose to see first a child, then a dog."
    -Helen Keller, quoted by Dr. Andy Mathis

  12. #101
    Senior Member tdc's Avatar
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    There are many pieces (too many to name) that affect me in a most powerful way, sometimes it is more of an uplifting stimulated effect, and sometimes it is something else (perhaps awe, empathy or nostalgia) and a little wetness might form in my eyes, but there are no pieces of music that make me instantly start crying.

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  14. #102
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    Sometimes just thinking of Beethoven's struggles and his desire to get out all of his art no matter what will move me when I listen to various works. But, the last movement of the 5th symphony when the final hammer blows to drive out the minor keys (triumphant over whatever) and I will be so moved to hear this passage...just another Beethoven stamp on this inner struggle it seems to me. I always sample this when hearing new 5th or one not heard before.

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    Senior Member flamencosketches's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by millionrainbows View Post
    This is based all on her singing, not the harmonic progression of the music, which is rather straightforward.
    WHEREAS the "Poltergeist" example is more based on harmonic progression and melody, although those children's voices are touching.

    So, what kind of a "cryer" are you? Are you more affected by, say, a single element such as a voice or violin, or more affected by the overall harmonic/melodic information?

    Also, I noticed that after my mother died, I was more easily affected by the female voice. Is this generally true of all opera fans? Did their mothers die?
    My mother died when I was young and I'm still working on finding some real appreciation for opera. Though I certainly love the female voice. Especially the mezzo and contralto ranges, but all of them, really.

    Many of her favorite songs still make me cry, but she was not one for classical music, more blues, folk, and rock.
    Last edited by flamencosketches; Jun-20-2019 at 01:58.

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  17. #104
    Senior Member Aleksandr Rachkofiev's Avatar
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    Unabashed romanticism is the perfect thing to evoke tearful reactions in emotionally confused teens with identity crises...

    Though some pieces in particular I've lately been driven to emotional lows/highs while listening to (not quite tears every time though) are

    Brahms - 10 Intermezzi


    Shostakovich - Piano Concerto no.2 (Andante)


    Faure - Elegie


    Gliere - Romance (I think this theme was also used in the Red Poppy)


    Atterberg - Suite no.3 for Strings


    Honorable mentions go to Gorecki's Symphony of Sorrowful Songs (especially the 3rd movement), Tchaikovsky's Hymn of the Cherubim (orthodox choral music seems the closer to the divine than any other religious music I've heard), the second movement of Scriabin's piano concerto, and of course the finale to Mahler's 2nd symphony.

    The most surprising thing as of late to drive me to tears has been the opening melody of Prokofiev's 9th Piano Sonata. I've always considered him one of the greatest melodists (perhaps THE greatest) but this one just really stands out to me - it seems so simple compared to the 3 preceding war sonatas, but it just offers up a gorgeous and satisfying, even mature conclusion to the whole set. There's just such a sense of acceptance and finality after all the conflict in 6,7, and 8.

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  19. #105
    Senior Member flamencosketches's Avatar
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    ^I forgot about Górecki. Yep, I have cried to that one in the past. 3rd movement.

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