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Thread: Our own reviews of operas we've attended

  1. #406
    Senior Member Bonetan's Avatar
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    @mountmccabe great reviews man! I've been looking forward to these

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    Senior Member Don Fatale's Avatar
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    Today (2pm start) I saw Der Fliegende Holländer in Ulm, Germany.

    This charming city of 120,000 is the birthplace of Albert Einstein and (bet you didn't know this!) the world's highest church steeple, which I'll pay €4 to climb up tomorrow morning, unless foggy. It also has the crookedest house and a bread museum. The city combines old timber framed buildings with many new ones that are designed in sympathy.

    Theatre Ulm is a general purpose hall built exactly 50 years ago. It's rather low lying with just a large nicely raked stalls and a 5 row balcony. The seats are extremely comfortable with sightlines excellent throughout. In common with other provincial German theatres, ticket prices are very low.

    I'm not an expert on Der Fliegende Holländer, but I'm pretty sure it doesn't take place in a cafe. Well here it does. More specifically a cafe/bar of an art deco style cinema. The protagonist is Senta, or rather an unnamed woman seems obsessed with a phantom movie and it's leading character. This concept could have been terrible, but for the attractive design and costuming, and very nice performances from Susanne Serfling and Dae-Hee Shin, both regulars on this stage. I'm not sure I'd buy Serfling's records, but her distinctive, bell-like, almost soubrettish, voice is effective, and proof that Wagner doesn't necessarily require Wagnerian voices. Dae-Hee Shin has a fine baritone voice which was a consistent pleasure.

    In the end it appears it was all this woman's dream and the opera concludes with a grey haired version of herself resuming her normal place in the cafe.

    So yes, they messed around with the story... but it was a very tidy mess. I enjoyed it.
    Last edited by Don Fatale; May-26-2019 at 22:24.

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    Senior Member Don Fatale's Avatar
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    La Traviata
    Macedonian Opera
    Skopje, North Macedonia
    29th May 2019

    As I'm in the middle of 5 operas in 7 days in 3 countries, I guess that's an opera trip, so I'll post extraneous details on the relevant thread. Meantime let's see what a national company of very limited resources can do with this Verdi warhorse.

    The prelude shows Violetta have just finished the business with a client in her bed. During Sempre Libera she's on the same bed involved in a threesome while Alfredo is singing off-stage. So this Violetta isn't portrayed as any kind of good girl. She even smokes. The production made use of the revolving stage, which means in this one interval version they were able to segue the act breaks without a curtain. I've seen worse in this respect recently. (I'm looking at you Budapest!) Good moments in the production - such as a female in devil horns taunting Violetta with a lewd dance during the off-stage street scene in Act III, and then at the end, quite affecting, Violetta dies alone her bedroom as she sings the renasce lines and then dies.

    Sanya Kerkez is borrowed from Belgrade. She's okay at this level. Started off a bit plummy of tone, but settled down. Blagoj Nacoski the well-travelled local is Alfredo. He does a nice job. Okar Nakashidze from Georgia was a youngish and big voiced baritone. Di Provenza al Mare was given like a recital, just him at the front of the stage as if it was the key aria of the opera. This seems to be his first assignment outside his home country, but I'm sure it won't be his last. A reasonable career beckons, I suspect. The chorus was not particularly well drilled. The smallish orchestra played acceptably.

    The house, dedicated to opera and ballet seats about 800, with a parter and then a steeply raked section, which they call the gallery. Seating is comfortable and sightlines good wherever you are. Prices are very cheap for a western purse. Annoyingly the parter seats have 7" screens showing the text, and this array of lights is visible to all in the raked area. Those in the raked rear seats make do with a dimly projected titles to each side of the stage.

    Footnote: A cat ran across the stage during the penultimate scene, which rather lightened the mood! I've seen many animals on any opera stage, this was my first cat.
    Rear of opera house from my hotel room. It's no looker!IMG_20190527_191140[2].jpg
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    Last edited by Don Fatale; May-28-2019 at 23:05.

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    The best imagery of Oper Frankfurt's performance of Der ferne Klang (seen May 11, 2019) in a new production by Damiano Michieletto is the first thing we see. A quote is projected onto the stage. It is most clear on the front curtain, which is gauzy and translucent, so it also shows up on the second and third curtains, distorted.

    These curtains divide the stage into sections. Michieletto feels the need to put on stage the distant sounds that Schreker leaves in the wings (Grete’s father’s gambling, a harp, Fritz’s opera). Though, curiously, the on-stage band of the second act is left off. (We get a piano).

    The curtained off sections typical represent the distance, though when it is people rather than text we can see what is going on. Fritz’s opera plays out like a fast-forward version of the first act of this production of Der ferne Klang, in case that wasn’t clear.

    Michieletto also gives us distance via time, through the silent roles of old Grete and old Fritz. They seem to be remembering some of the action, and as the opera goes on, interacting with it. The objection has been raised that this makes little sense since Fritz dies young, but this production imagines longer gaps between acts than the 10 and 5 years that Schreker specifies. Either that or time is very cruel to them; by the end singer-Fritz is made up to look like the silent old Fritz that has been haunting the stage.

    All that being said, the production still worked really well. It was consistently entertaining, the large cast showed strong acting skills, the costumes and sets were convincing. The story came through. There was a lot of detail to the interactions, it's just that overall the production seemed to miss a lot of what Scheker was doing with the opera.

    I don’t know this score well enough to have specific comments on the conducting of Florian Erdl, or the singing of Jennifer Holloway (Grete), Ian Koziara (Fritz), or the rest of the cast. I was thrilled to have the chance to hear this rarely performed opera.

    Last edited by mountmccabe; Jun-01-2019 at 16:45.

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    A few days ago, I saw Il Trittico at the Bayerische Staatsoper. First of all, this production by Lotte de Beer is the best opera production I have ever seen. She took a good concept of tying the 3 operas together in the same set, kept the costuming fairly traditional but placed it in a pretty modernistic looking set that also rotated to create visually incredible scenes, especially at the end of Suor Angelica - as the opera is ending (with the chorus singing down to her that she will be saved), the set reveals a giant brightly illuminated cross holding her dead son waving to her from heaven. I can't really describe how moving it was in words to be honest....

    Anyway, this review by one of my favorite bloggers covers most of the important details about the production and the singing (the cast list was mostly the same) so I won't revisit the unchanged details, but the main difference I noticed was the conducting by Bertrand de Billy (replacing Kirill Petrenko). I've listened to Petrenko's version on YouTube many times, so it's easy for me to do a comparison - the most noticeable thing was that Petrenko's tempi were sometimes quite fast (especially during Suor Angelica) but de Billy took slower tempi, which matched closer to most of the recordings I heard. Also it seemed like the orchestra and singers were quite out of sync at times (even up to a full beat off) which I was a bit surprised by.

    And of course, I have to specifically highlight Ermonela Jaho who completely owns the role of Suor Angelica, from start to finish. She got by far the loudest ovation from the Munich audience which was well deserved. I also thought Rosa Feola was great as Lauretta in Gianni Schicchi, and evidently my opinion was shared by some college-age looking guy sitting in the first row of the Parkett, who tried to throw a large bouquet of flowers to her during her curtain call. Unfortunately the flowers didn't quite make it and landed in the overhang above the pit :-\

    And finally, I like reviews that comment about audience behavior so I'll take a bit of time to do that. As might be expected, the Munich audience was very respectful (I didn't hear a single ringtone or disrespectfully loud conversation etc.), and it was also kind of funny to see these 50-60 year old German couples downing mugs of beer in the cafe. But there was 1 guy who almost ruined my night - he stood up to let me into my seat and I of course said "danke" but apparently not loudly enough for his tastes, because he stood up and yelled (in English, across half of the Parkett section) "thank you" at me multiple times, since I had apparently personally disrespected him by not thanking him profusely enough for deigning to stand up to allow me to reach my seat. It was more than a little bit embarrassing but thankfully, there were no further seat-related incidents during intermission or afterwards and it didn't really take away from my enjoyment of the opera!

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    Senior Member Don Fatale's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ugen64 View Post
    A few days ago, I saw Il Trittico at the Bayerische Staatsoper. First of all, this production by Lotte de Beer is the best opera production I have ever seen. She took a good concept of tying the 3 operas together in the same set, kept the costuming fairly traditional but placed it in a pretty modernistic looking set that also rotated to create visually incredible scenes, especially at the end of Suor Angelica - as the opera is ending (with the chorus singing down to her that she will be saved), the set reveals a giant brightly illuminated cross holding her dead son waving to her from heaven. I can't really describe how moving it was in words to be honest [...]
    And finally, I like reviews that comment about audience behavior so I'll take a bit of time to do that. As might be expected, the Munich audience was very respectful (I didn't hear a single ringtone or disrespectfully loud conversation etc.), and it was also kind of funny to see these 50-60 year old German couples downing mugs of beer in the cafe. But there was 1 guy who almost ruined my night - he stood up to let me into my seat and I of course said "danke" but apparently not loudly enough for his tastes, because he stood up and yelled (in English, across half of the Parkett section) "thank you" at me multiple times, since I had apparently personally disrespected him by not thanking him profusely enough for deigning to stand up to allow me to reach my seat. It was more than a little bit embarrassing but thankfully, there were no further seat-related incidents during intermission or afterwards and it didn't really take away from my enjoyment of the opera!
    I'm going to disagree on this production. I hated it. I was waiting for the Star Wars stormtroopers to arrive! Ermonela Jaho is such a good singer and actress. I've been a fan since I saw her in Manon some years ago, and this was my main reason for attending.

    Sorry to hear about the boorish behaviour of somebody. That's bad, and thankfully rare. I agree that German audiences are well behaved, as is the Covent Garden audience. I didn't mention in my Skopje review how bad the audience was, both in terms of timekeeping (fully 15 minutes late to start) and constant use of mobile phones for various purposes. I guess Skopje must have a lot of doctors on call, or perhaps waiting for the birth of a child, or perhaps they are high ranking politicians keeping abreast of an international crises, but no, they're just ignorant and inconsiderate.
    Last edited by Don Fatale; Jun-01-2019 at 22:10.

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    I don't have a ton to say about Iphigénie en Tauride, seen May 10 at Oper Stuttgart. This is another opera I had limited familiarity with, and the lack of English subtitles didn't help (of course I realize I should not expect English subtitles while traveling, and I'm thrilled that the five other German houses I've been to have had them when I attended).

    The other thing that didn't help was Krzysztof Warlikowski's production. It's not a new production - it's from 2006 (which means it may show up at SFO in a few years, haha) - and it has been seen at quite a few houses, but it was new to me. The production seems to be about dreams and memories, and dramatizing with supers things are described or otherwise happen off-stage (this is starting to be my least favorite directorial choice). I honestly had no idea what was going on, even though the story is quite simple and direct. Also with so much going on on stage, the chorus (and a few minor roles) were left in the orchestra pit.

    Fortunately we had a very strong cast. Amanda Majeski made a lot of the wonderful writing for Iphigénie. My attention was flagging some coming up to the only interval, but "O malheureuse Iphigénie" was a treat to hear. Jarrett Ott and Elmar Gilbertsson were both great as Oreste and Pylade, and Carina Schmieger made Diane stand out.

    Stefano Montanari conducted the orchestra which sounded so good.

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    Senior Member Don Fatale's Avatar
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    I finally made it to the opera in Sofia. It's a classic house, not large, but has a national opera company feeling. For patrons it's comfortable with good sightlines. Un Ballo in Maschera was performed, featuring a guest performance by big voiced Maria Guleghina. House regulars Daniel Damyanov (tenor) and Kiril Manalov (baritone) matched her well, and I was impressed with their quality. One senses that with a packed house and a big name singer visiting, it encouraged strong performances. Guleghina received a star's welcome with some extended ovations. In every respect I thought it was better than the Munich Ballo I saw a couple of weeks ago. Surtitles in Bulgarian and English. I enjoyed everything about the evening, and look forward to returning to Sofia for operas in the future.
    Last edited by Don Fatale; Jun-03-2019 at 19:03.

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  14. #414
    Senior Member Belowpar's Avatar
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    I've really enjoyed this tread and keep resolving to join in. so...

    09 06 Royal Opera House CG London

    Andrea Chenier
    y

    Just when you thought things couldn't get any worse...the ROH give a truly 'old fashioned' or authentic (take your pick) production. No transpositions in time to another revolution, no leather trenchcoats or inflatable crocodiles, and remarkably not a single anachronism. What were they thinking? Because it works! This may cause them to reconsider some of the productions they currently have ...but I'm not holding my breath.


    This was a revival of John McVicars 2015 production. I missed it then because its a piece that left no impression on me when I saw it in two different productions 20+ years ago, and I had little appetite to see it again. But Kudos to the team, it looked good and the drama shone through.

    Another thing that was 'old fashioned' was singers coming to the front of the stage and just letting rip!

    Daniel Oren gave us a stirring version, possibly some subtleties were lost but apart from Act 3 it was taught and engaging.

    Alagna, still looks young (on sage!) and even if his voice seemed darker and heavier than in the past it worked well. He produced ample volume and the audience lapped him up. A more critical approach might point to his pronounced vibrato on extended notes but he's always been good in duets and he won the day.

    Dimitri Platanias’s Gérard was the pick of the male performances. A strong performance vocally and acting. A new name to me.

    Sondra Radvanovsky has big voice and at least in this part has a steely sound. She convinced and delivered in spades. Suffice ot say thanks to discovering it via the film Philadelphia, La Mamma Morte has become hte track Mrs BP selects on the iPlayer above all others. Any version but Callas's has been rejected. However tonight she passed the test. Rare praise indeed

    I'm a little high on this at the moment, but I think this was one of those occasions which get pretty much everything this Opera has to offer and actually makes it feel better than it really is at least while you are there. Not sure you can ask much more than that.

    PS

    A seat in the gods cost us £13 each and while a lot of the action was hidden, I still think these are the best value seats in London theatre. The sound is excellent and far superior to middle to high in the Amphitheatre.

    PPS
    Tosca tomorrow night and with the two operas composed only 3 years apart,with a plot involving a similar 'sex' triangle, this is intelligent programming.


    PPS
    This was a Matinee performance. I've never really been an evening person and you should at least try and attend one of these.
    It may have helped explain the audience being more involved than usual. That's never a bad thing in the theatre.
    Last edited by Belowpar; Jun-09-2019 at 22:17.

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    Senior Member Don Fatale's Avatar
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    Belowpar, I was very glad to read the good reviews for this Andrea Chenier. I haven't seen it, but would certainly have appreciated it, and the cast. I agree that some of the slips provide a good experience, particularly if you have considerate neighbours.

    PS
    From armed robber to opera director? I think you mean David McVicar, no relation. :-)
    Last edited by Don Fatale; Jun-09-2019 at 22:46.

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    Speaking of David McVicar, this afternoon I saw opening night of Rusalka at San Francisco Opera. I also saw the final dress on Thursday.

    Rachel Willis-Sørensen is making her title role debut and it's really quite wonderful. She really inhabits this non-human character, really showing that awkwardness as a human. Her expression of despair to Vodník was powerful and compelling. She sounds good in the role, if a bit quiet at the low end. The object of her affection is Brandon Jovanovich, convincing as the prince gone mad from seeing the nymphs. He easily has the power, and was moving in his death aria. His voice blended well with the Foreign Princess (Sarah Cambidge) in their duets.

    Vodník was Kristinn Sigmundsson, and came off as a really caring father/goblin, and was moving in his act 2 lament. Jamie Barton seems to be having a blast as Ježibaba, and she brings so much character to the role.

    The glorious orchestra was led by Eun Sun Kim, making her SFO debut. The score came off as heartbreaking, with strong unity. it was easy to get swept up by the music.

    David McVicar's production was directed locally by Leah Hausman. It is very typical McVicar; naturalistic sets*, a few gags that make the audience laugh but don't necessarily help the story at all, and some decent person-regie. It premiered at Lyric Opera of Chicago; it goes to Canadian Opera Company in Toronto next.

    This one also has a big of stage business during the overture, with a taste of what happens between act 1 and act 2: the Prince comes out on stage, and Rusalka joins him but he rebuffs her. She leaves, the curtain rises and we shift back to before the first act. The wood nymphs are romping around the forest. The prince sees them, mesmerized, and ends up dancing off the stage with one of the extras. Rusalka stays in her pond (not actual water) or the tree above it until Ježibaba releases her. She still has trouble on land, and keeps trying to stand up, but just when it seems like she's got it she falls down (foreshadowing!) Eventually Ježibaba's ravens carry her away.

    Act 2 included actual ballet as entertainment, two soloists plus four more dancers. Rusalka comes in confused but intrigued and goes to join them (I was reminded of Pat Nixon and The Red Detachment of Women in Nixon in China). There are a few other touches that work to show her as not belonging to this world, but most of that happens behind a dropped wall (with glass windows) during Vodník's lament. In Act 3 Vodník actually gets the kitchen boy. The ending is, however, left with just the desperate Prince and the transformed Rusalka (now with white hair) on stage, so we get the full impact of their loss.



    * I don't think the opera is set at any specific time (correct me if I'm wrong) so he wasn't able to time shift it. If I had to guess, I might say it was set at the time of composition... but I cannot place clothing by era.

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    To complete the SFO summer season, I have also seen Carmen (opening night) and Orlando (final dress rehearsal only; I have a ticket for the final performance in the run).

    Both were enjoyable, neither were very exciting.

    The Zambello Carmen comes to town for a season, with role debuts for J'Nai Bridges and Matthew Polenzani in the two main roles. J'Nai Bridges inhabited the character well on stage, but failed to take flight in the vocalism. There were flashes (and I'm tempted to see a later performance of the run) but she also seemed underpowered, generally. Polenzani was more bland. More steady of voice, but to less effect. Far more exciting was Anita Hartig - making her SFO but not role debut - as Micaëla. She commanded the stage when she showed up, her voice exciting and clear.

    James Gaffigan led the orchestra in what seemed to me to be a tired rendition of the score (on opening night!). I did not leave the building with any of the music stuck in my head (as I did a few years ago), as it never seemed to cohere.

    The sets and costumes provide a traditional setting, but Zambello has a number of odd touches that seemed to add nothing to the opera. Though Escamillo (Kyle Ketelsen) showed up riding on a giant horse (Drogan), so that was fun.


    The third opera is Orlando.

    Christina Gansch stands out as Dorinda in her SFO debut. Aryeh Nussbaum Cohen sounds amazing as Medoro, but doesn't have much character in his acting. I liked Heidi Stober as Angelica. Sasha Cooke sings the title role of Orlando; she's solid except at the lower end of the role. Christian Van Horn chewed some scenery as Zoroastro, and managed most of the quick runs he's given.

    Christopher Moulds conducts the small orchestra that still manages to be overpowered at times. There's not quite the bite, the liveliness I prefer in this rep.

    The production by Harry Fehr is from Scottish Opera. It moves the action to a west London hospital in Autumn 1940, so everything happens inside. Zoroastro is a doctor doing ECT rather than a sorcerer, Orlando is a pilot that was shot down, Angelica is a nurse, and so on. That being said, I consider the direction to be the more traditional of these two operas.

    As noted I have a ticket to see a proper performance of Orlando; I'm excited to see how Aryeh Nussbaum Cohen has grown into the role, and to see how the orchestral sound and Moulds' approach has changed.

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    Quote Originally Posted by mountmccabe View Post
    Speaking of David McVicar, this afternoon I saw opening night of Rusalka at San Francisco Opera. I also saw the final dress on Thursday...

    This one also has a big of stage business during the overture, with a taste of what happens between act 1 and act 2: the Prince comes out on stage, and Rusalka joins him but he rebuffs her. She leaves, the curtain rises and we shift back to before the first act. The wood nymphs are romping around the forest. The prince sees them, mesmerized, and ends up dancing off the stage with one of the extras.
    After seeing the second performance, and attending with my wife who is able to tell dresses apart... I believe I misunderstood this overture stage business.

    It's not Rachel Willis-Sørensen on stage during the overture; it is perhaps Sarah Cambidge but I don't think she's there as the Foreign Princess. I had thought the dress was the same as the one Rusalka wears at the start of Act 2, but I was mistaken. Let's call this character Previous Woman.

    The Prince is alone, looking at a giant painting (on the curtain) of a forest glade with a pond and a moon, much like we see when the curtain rises (but not exactly). He places his hand on the pond, thoughtfully, and continues on. Then Previous Woman comes out, expecting affection from him, but the fickle prince has moved on. He is now smitten with the sprites of the forest. This way as the curtain opens it is not a flashback, but a continuation: he ignores Previous Woman and goes back to the forest to explore the feelings he had when he sensed Rusalka (and she became infatuated with him) and the wood sprites.

    This fits with the discussion by the Gamekeeper and the Kitchen Boy at the start of Act 2; the prince is fickle (by providing a third in the chain), and that people go wild upon seeing the forest creatures. This also fits with the kitchen boy actually being captured by Vodník, another thing the Gamekeeper warns about.

    None of this is particularly necessary, but it does reinforce how the opera works: characters say things are going to happen, then they happen. Little to nothing is a surprise.


    I really loved this performance, and if anything I think everybody sounded better than opening night and the final dress.

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    Quote Originally Posted by mountmccabe View Post
    The third opera is Orlando.

    Christina Gansch stands out as Dorinda in her SFO debut. Aryeh Nussbaum Cohen sounds amazing as Medoro, but doesn't have much character in his acting. I liked Heidi Stober as Angelica. Sasha Cooke sings the title role of Orlando; she's solid except at the lower end of the role. Christian Van Horn chewed some scenery as Zoroastro, and managed most of the quick runs he's given.

    Christopher Moulds conducts the small orchestra that still manages to be overpowered at times. There's not quite the bite, the liveliness I prefer in this rep.
    I saw the final performance last night. I enjoyed it more than the final dress rehearsal. Christina Gansch really sparkles as Dorinda, and has a lot of fun with her third act showpiece. She consistently sounds good and I'd love to hear her again. Aryeh Nussbaum Cohen feels much more at home as Medoro; the early stiffness has mellowed quite a bit. He still sounds wonderful, singing with such fantastic technique. Christian Van Horn also sounded more solid as Zoroastro and the acting didn't feel as campy. Sasha Cooke does well bringing out the character of Orlando, though at times it feels silly (some of this is the opera/this production).

    There did seem to be more bounce in the orchestra last night, and moments of real fun.

    Perhaps some of (all of this) is from being in the Orchestra rather than the Grand Tier, but from a friend that saw the entire run (other than the final performance last night) they have all been getting better throughout.

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    Quote Originally Posted by mountmccabe View Post
    After seeing the second performance, and attending with my wife who is able to tell dresses apart... I believe I misunderstood this overture stage business.

    It's not Rachel Willis-Sørensen on stage during the overture; it is perhaps Sarah Cambidge but I don't think she's there as the Foreign Princess. I had thought the dress was the same as the one Rusalka wears at the start of Act 2, but I was mistaken. Let's call this character Previous Woman.

    The Prince is alone, looking at a giant painting (on the curtain) of a forest glade with a pond and a moon, much like we see when the curtain rises (but not exactly). He places his hand on the pond, thoughtfully, and continues on. Then Previous Woman comes out, expecting affection from him, but the fickle prince has moved on. He is now smitten with the sprites of the forest. This way as the curtain opens it is not a flashback, but a continuation: he ignores Previous Woman and goes back to the forest to explore the feelings he had when he sensed Rusalka (and she became infatuated with him) and the wood sprites.

    This fits with the discussion by the Gamekeeper and the Kitchen Boy at the start of Act 2; the prince is fickle (by providing a third in the chain), and that people go wild upon seeing the forest creatures. This also fits with the kitchen boy actually being captured by Vodník, another thing the Gamekeeper warns about.

    None of this is particularly necessary, but it does reinforce how the opera works: characters say things are going to happen, then they happen. Little to nothing is a surprise.


    I really loved this performance, and if anything I think everybody sounded better than opening night and the final dress.
    I was in the audience for the final performance of the run, yesterday. I agree with you that the singing and orchestra were fantastic throughout - I've seen most of the productions in SF this year and this was up there with my favorite one of the season, Arabella.

    However, the opera itself didn't really resonate with me that much, for some reason. I'm not sure why - it was similar in many ways to The Snow Maiden (similar plot threads - mythical being becomes a human girl, falls in love, gets rejected and there's a tragic ending - and also the music is quite similar actually) which I saw in St Petersburg and absolutely loved. I also normally like Dvorak's orchestral music in general... so I was surprised to find that this opera wasn't my favorite. Still, an enjoyable evening as always at SFO.

    To give another brief review... earlier in the week I was in Amsterdam and saw Pelleas et Melisande as part of the Holland Festival. The cast was solid (Elena Tsallagova as Melisande was especially great) and it was the Concertgebouw Orchestra in the pit where you can't go wrong. The conductor was Stephane Deneve who replaced the disgraced Daniele Gatti, and I thought he did OK. But the production... it was visually quite spectacular but very modernistic and I wasn't sure what to make of it. Some scenes were really jarring (like when Melisande is teasing Pelleas with her long hair out the window, the production was completely at odds with the libretto) but in others, like the scene where Golaud kills Pelleas were very convincing.

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