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Thread: Our own reviews of operas we've attended

  1. #76
    Senior Member Don Fatale's Avatar
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    Great reviews fantasia2000. We'll have to compare notes on the most uncomfortable theatres at some point.

    I'm sorry I missed Le Roi Arthus. I like the music, and the Bastille too.

    Do you have plans to come to Europe again?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Don Fatale View Post
    Great reviews fantasia2000. We'll have to compare notes on the most uncomfortable theatres at some point.

    I'm sorry I missed Le Roi Arthus. I like the music, and the Bastille too.

    Do you have plans to come to Europe again?
    Thanks! Yeah, definitely have to compare notes on the seats.

    Le Roi Arthus was indeed great production, with awesome singing! When else will you be able to catch this opera? That was my thinking. I wanted to see Massenet's "Le cid" earlier on (also with Alagna), but the scheduling didn't work, as I couldn't find any other operas around that timeframe that I desperately want to see.

    I'm thinking to go again mid-October for three back-to-back star-studded productions, provided I can take time off work, though. They are:
    10/16 - Monteverdi's "L´incoronazione di Poppea" at Theater an der Wien, JC Spinosi conducting. With Christophe Dumaux, Valer Sabadus, Jennifer Larmore and Alex Penda, it's hard to go wrong!
    10/17 - Hasse's "Siroe" concert-style at Concertgebouw, George Petrou conducting (I'm a big fan now!!!). With Max Emmanuel Cencic & Julia Lezhneva, it's also, hard to go wrong!
    10/18 - Meyerbeer's "Vasco da Gama" at Berlin Oper, with Roberto Alagna and Sophie Koch, it's hard to go wrong too! Besides, this is the premiere of the newly rehabilitated L'Africaine, closer to Meyerbeer's intention, supposedly. Yes, it's a bit change from the first two, but this will be a major event, methinks.

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    Senior Member Bellinilover's Avatar
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    I saw LE NOZZE DI FIGARO at Wolf Trap (Virginia, USA) today. One thing I appreciate about this theater, a former barn, is that it's small enough so that, even sitting upstairs, you can see everything clearly without using opera glasses. This production of FIGARO was set in the 1880's, the director's reasoning for this time-change being that there was a second restoration of the Spanish monarchy at around that time. There were basically three sets: a garden with a working fountain for the last act, and for the first three acts two dilapidated rooms. I liked the fact that the sets and costumes looked really Spanish, as in the past I've tended to forget that FIGARO takes place in Spain and not Vienna or somewhere else. Direction-wise there wasn't a dull or "dead" moment, and all of the singers were wonderful, though some of Figaro's high notes sounded strained. The singer portraying the Count created the most "fully rounded" character. He had a huge voice, probably even a little too big for Mozart, but he certainly was vivid. The very funny Doctor Bartolo was, somewhat unexpectedly, thin and cadaverous rather than your typical "fat buffo." This was an intimate production that very well-sung and well-staged, and I was happy to have it for my first "live" FIGARO.

    Edited to add: The recitatives were accompanied by fortepiano rather than the more usual harpsichord.
    Last edited by Bellinilover; Jun-15-2015 at 03:26.

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    Senior Member Itullian's Avatar
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    Small productions can be very charming.
    Sounds like that one was.
    Thank you for sharing.
    When all else fails, listen to Thick as a Brick.

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    I saw a slightly staged production of Fidelio last night. The San Francisco Symphony conducted by Michael Tilson Thomas.

    Jaquino - Nicholas Phan
    Marzelline - Joélle Harvey
    Rocco - Kevin Langan
    Leonore - Nina Stemme
    Don Pizarro - Alan Held
    Brandon Jovanovich - Florestan
    Don Fernando - Luca Pisaroni

    Stemme sounded amazing. There were a few moments where the top seemed insecure but overall she was in control. I am thrilled to have seen her. Jovanovich was glorious as Florestan; dominating the second act. Alan Held had some great moments, though I kept wishing the orchestra didn't cover him. Harvey had a lovely top, but was otherwise mostly hidden. The SFS sounded tight but rarely seemed to notice there were singers.

    I have a question: there was clapping after nearly every number. Is this common for singspiele? Was it because this was a symphony concert with their audience?

    Anyway MTT and the cast seemed to push through a bit more in the second act. The scene break was shorter than some of the song to dialogue transitions in the first act. Part of me wants to think this contributed to the second act holding together better but I think that's just because it's better.

    The cast wore formal black. They entered when they would be on stage if this were staged. There were some gestures. Florestan was on the ground for the start of act 2. The only contact (I believe) was between Leonore and Florestan, embracing and holding hands. There were no props and no miming of props save for the key (to the point that I started to wonder if there actually was a key even though there were no chains to unlock).

    The second act was thrilling. The singers and orchestra drew me in (away from the surtitles) and held on despite the limitations of the libretto. I was on edge when Leonore confronted Pizarro!

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  10. #81
    Senior Member DavidA's Avatar
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    Attended Calixto Bieito's Carmen as broadcast from the ENO last night. In spite of the producer's often misguided ideas, it did produce a thrilling evening's entertainment. Bieito is one of those producers who have never heard of the principle of 'more is less' and proceeds the whole way through to assault us with his ideas. Yes, I know that there is sex and violence in Carmen but does it have to be rammed home with all the subtlety of a sledgehammer?
    I mean, do men, even if they are soldiers, have to have simulated orgasms when they lay eyes on a women? And although we know that Carmen's companions are a pretty unsavoury lot, do they have to beat up their hostage, kick his head in and then urinate over him to make the point? And were Carmen and her companions drunken hookers? OK, they were women of easy virtue but to provide them with a pimp seems a bit far fetched. Yes, we know Carmen is desperate to seduce Jose, but does she have to take her knickers off only to have to slip them back on again? And why is Michaela portrayed as a tart? In Bizet's concept she is the pious, village girl who represents the opposite alternative from Carmen. And why are the street urchins at a soup kitchen rather than marching behind the soldiers as the score suggests?
    Pity because the cast provided us with a lot of energy in this updated Carmen even if the results were somewhat mixed vocally. Dominating the stage was Justina Gringyte as Carmen, sexy, alluring and dangerous in split skirts. I can honestly say (given the assumed premise of what Carmen is) that I have never seen a better Carmen on stage. She was terrific! Absolutely magnetic from beginning to end in her acting and singing.
    Eric Cutler's Jose was well sung but was not helped to develop the character because of the producer's misguided ideas that all men start off as abusers of women, rather than degenerating to it because of infatuation as Bizet indicates. The portrayal of Micaela was misconceived but Eleanor Dennis at least sang the role with considerable distinction. The Escamillo (presented as a spiv rater than a swaggering toreador) acted well but was vocally not up to the part. Richard Armstrong conducted with great energy and the drama musically was well realised.
    Although I have many reservations about this production, the cast through their sheer energy gave us a rattling good evening's entertainment. Best of all was the indestructible music of a great operatic genius, who sadly died far too young!
    Last edited by DavidA; Jul-02-2015 at 10:33.

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    Senior Member Belowpar's Avatar
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    This is the thread that I wished got more posts. I prefer reading the views of enthusiasts over those of professional cynics ,sorry critics, who like to fool themselves they are somehow objective about their free trips to the theatre.

    I realise I've been remiss and will do a separate report on my trip to XXXXXXXX

    However I did make it to Falstaff at the ROH last week. This was a most enjoyable evening and the 'best' production of this great Opera I've seen. The updating worked very well and after reading a programme essay I thought more about the class issues than I had at previous encounters. However maybe they could have compromised on some of the sets, there was an uncommon amount of time waiting between scenes. A small gripe but we are looking for perfection here!.

    My last Falstaff was Tyrfel and while Ambrogio Maestri can't SING as well, he offers a fine comic characterisation and I would happily see either in this part again. Luis Gomes as Fenton produced the odd, 'odd' sound but was effective with some really good singing but I didn't care that much for the rest of the male singers. The singing honours belonged to two newcomers (to me) Ainhoa Areta as Alice Ford and Anna Devin as Nannetta. The sparkle was there, mainly in ensembles but Michael Shonwandt the conductor is perhaps not a natural Verdian?

    Reading this back I'm surprised at how ”Critical” I've been. In the lead up to this visit I've been listening to the Karajan/Gobbi recording and whilst Maestri offers a different interesting take on Falstaff and Devin sang almost as beautifully as Moffo, it's hard on the conductor to compare him with Karajan's take on Verdi's most detailed Orchestral writings? Perhaps I'd have enjoyed it even more had I not had the CD's on repeat play the week before.

    I could definitely see this production again. Recommended.

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  14. #83
    Senior Member Don Fatale's Avatar
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    I agree with you about reading the reviews of others here. This is always a thread I look for.

    As to this current Falstaff, although it's a fine enough production, very professionally done, I didn't find it as funny as others I've seen (7 different productions including the previous ROH and ENO). Both of those were preferable. In fact in the forest scene in every other production I'd seen was preferable. This forest was dull i.e. just the cast in hooked cloaks on a near empty stage. I want fairies, and twinkly lights, and a magical and charming scene, and this didn't deliver!

    I was toying with seeing Falstaff at La Scala in October, and then discovered it was the same production.

    As to the singing, I was generally happy, although the balance between the singers and the orchestra wasn't great. I have to blame the conductor.

    I have an obsession with this opera, and I can't help but view any performance (and production) with a critical eye and ear. Surely this opera is a dream job for set and costume designers and for a theatre trained director.
    Last edited by Don Fatale; Jul-19-2015 at 23:16.

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    Just returned from Prom 25, Monteverdi: L'Orfeo. And what a wonderful evening it was. Sir John Eliot Gardiner conducted. He has picked the most amazing young voices to sing this opera. Krystian Adam as Orpheus, Mariana Flores as Eurydice/Hope, Francesca Aspromonte as Music/Messenger and Gianluca Buratto as Charon/Pluto.

    When I bought a ticket I was worried that that the Royal Albert Hall was too large for a Renaissance opera. The opera has a small orchestra, and the voices should be suited to a more intimate venue. How wrong I was. Because the orchestra was small the voices projected more. And this was the quietest audience I have ever experienced, not bad for a 5000 seater. The diction and projection of the singers was incredible. I was at the back in the circle, and if I got lost in the libretto I could listen to key words from the stage and find the right line, and I don't even know Renaissance Italian!. The cavernous acoustics of the Royal Albert Hall gave this opera a most mystical sound that could not be achieved elsewhere.

    Special mention must be given to the chorus the backbone of the production. And the semi staging worked perfectly. You could hear the audience gasp when Orfeo turns back and looks at Eurydice. The big dance at the end was the icing on the cake, but you don't get to hear the audiences laughter on the BBC i Player recording, when the cast dance around Pluto. Shame the BBC didn't film this, because musically and visually this hits a home run. And you will never get to see Krystian Adam playing Orfeo as an ancient Greek Al Jolson. Just listen the the audiences reaction on the i player.

    Have a listen on the BBC Proms page http://www.bbc.co.uk/events/e548gw#b0640j4n
    Last edited by Loge; Aug-05-2015 at 01:21.

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    Senior Member Donata's Avatar
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    I went to see Salome at the Santa Fe Opera on July the 22nd. It was a very warm evening in Santa Fe, making one wish for it to rain and cool things off. I was interested in how they were going to pull off staging it in 1905, the year the opera was first staged. It didn't quite work. They were going for a Freudian interpretation of the story, delving into the psychological aspect.
    The setting was a giant rotating cube that was Jochanaan's cell and represented everyone's private prison. The orchestra seemed especially loud, causing the singers to have to strain a bit to be heard. Narraboth's suicide was oddly staged and comical. One moment this guy is just standing there doing nothing, then suddenly he is stabbing himself and writhing on the floor. It didn't seem to fit.
    The Dance of the Seven Veils had neither veils nor dancing; it was a series of flashbacks that was more like watching a series of Salome’s therapy sessions, making the viewer wonder why Herod would be willing to give up half his kingdom. It also was performed in private, not in front of an audience, which makes Herod's desperation to save face out of place. Herod could easily have dismissed Salome's demands. I think Salome is dependent on its biblical setting to make sense. The producer's vision was ambitious and while some things worked, like the costumes and the scenery, others didn't. The singers did a good job with the material, and they sang really well. Despite its flaws it was a decent performance, Santa Fe always puts on a good show.
    "If a composer could say what he had to say in words he would not bother trying to say it in music." Gustav Mahler

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    Just returned from Prom 39, Mozart: Abduction from Seraglio or as I like to call it Escape from a Brothel. The only other Mozart opera seen, Don Giovanni turned out to be a bit of a disappointment. However I really enjoyed this one. The production was semi staged, yet with props, action and full costumes. The production for the Proms was a transfer from Glyndebourne earlier this year. Robin Ticciati conducted the Orchestra of the Age of Enlightenment. The cast was filled with excellent young singers (by that I mean they all looked under 40). Edgaras Montvidas as Belmonte, Sally Matthews as Konstanze, Brenden Patrick as Gunnell Pedrillo. The standouts for me were Tobias Kehrer as Osmin and Mari Eriksmoen as Blonde. They were my favorite characters and had a hilarious food fight at the beginning of the second Act 2. Franck Saurel starred in the speaking role of a rather dashing Pasha Selim.

    My only gripes with the production? They played some background sound over speakers. The sound of water and bird song. Which drowned out the beautiful music that accompanies Konstanze's entrance (Mozart Serenade No 10 In B Flat Major K 361 III Adagio, I believe. I remembered the music from Amadeus, when Salieri first meets Mozart). And boy was it long. The BBC Prom website said it was 2 hours 20 mins. It turned out to run 3 hours 45 mins. My, that is Wagnerian length. Heck I have seen shorter Wagner operas! Apparently they kept in all the dialogue. Come to think of it that is longer than most Shakespeare plays I have seen. But apart from that brilliant. And Mozart's infectious music keeps you buoyed up all the way through.

    Anyway Glyndbourne is touring with this in the autumn. Canterbury, Milton Keynes, Norwich, Plymouth and Woking. If you are in the UK and have four hours to spare, I highly recommend it.
    Last edited by Loge; Aug-15-2015 at 03:05.

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  22. #87
    Senior Member Don Fatale's Avatar
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    Orpheus and Eurydice
    Edinburgh
    14-Aug-2015

    Loge, one woman's abductor is another's rescuer, I guess. I was listening to it on the radio as I was driving away from the opera I saw in Edinburgh. Glad you enjoyed it. I've yet to appreciate it even though I've seen it live a couple of times. Don Giovanni should really impress rather more.

    I saw Orpheus and Eurydice (yep, in English) at an Edinburgh fringe show. A pretty small affair with less than a 100 seats, sort of in-the-round, or whatever it's called when the stage is the central floor with the audience on 3 sides. Musicians were violin, viola, cello and a keyboard imitating a harpsichord. It's a young cast with the up and coming young countertenor Magid El-Bushra the ever-present figure... that is except for Eurydice, even though she's playing dead on a hotel bed/mortuary slab for most of the show, even before the audience were admitted.

    The numerous cuts left the running time at barely an hour. With its intimate scale and studentish vibe I'm not sure a newcomer would have known for sure that they'd seen an 'opera'.

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    Senior Member Don Fatale's Avatar
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    Falstaff
    Black Cat Opera Company
    Camberley (Surrey)
    15-Aug-2015

    A 400 mile drive from Edinburgh left me wishing I had a standing place for this opera in Camberley's intimate 400 seat theatre. I wasn't making the trip especially for this, I was just hoping that the en-route detour would be worth it.

    I'll start with the orchestra, playing in front of the stage rather than in a pit. There were 17 players including a keyboard guy filling gaps, such as a perfect imitation of a lute while Alice faked it. Falstaff is a demanding piece, particularly for strings which have to constantly be sharp and incisive. They seemed to move between well-drilled sequences to areas where their musicianship and tone was exposed. Wind instruments seem to flatter by comparison. When was the last time you heard a bad flute/piccolo player?

    And so to the singers. It would be fair to say there was a breadth of abilities and experience. The key to it all was the Falstaff played by Phillip Guy Bromley. No spring chicken, he uses his experience to carry the role lightly, his acting capturing Falstaff's multi-faceted personality most endearingly. His voice is in fine fettle indeed, always a pleasure to listen to. He's also the director. I'll also mention the Fords - a handsome couple indeed. Philip Smith has an elegant baritone and delivered his parts with aplomb. I expect to see his career progressing. Alice, sung by vocal-student Beatrice Acland, is vey much the leader-of-the-gang here and gives a confident and attractive showing, although the voice lacks refinement as yet. There was another Ford too, Peter Ford the conductor. He does a splendid job.

    Let's talk about staging. Here, only the most essential props were used (benches and tables in the tavern, screen for lovers to hide behind, laundry basket, horns, oak tree. A couple of backdrops help set the scenes. The cast were suitably attired in an Elizabethan style. It leaves them to concentrate on acting and singing, and generally presenting the opera's plot. There were surtitles above the stage.

    I was left thinking that so well did this small production work that it was as if Verdi himself might have envisaged it in this form. And following on from last night's comment about whether the audience felt they'd seen an opera. Here there was no doubt.

    In summary, I say Bravi to the Black Cat Opera Company. Well worth my little detour. Do look out for them in the future productions in the London area.
    Last edited by Don Fatale; Aug-16-2015 at 19:30.

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  26. #89
    Senior Member Dongiovanni's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Loge View Post
    Just returned from Prom 25, Monteverdi: L'Orfeo. And what a wonderful evening it was. Sir John Eliot Gardiner conducted. He has picked the most amazing young voices to sing this opera. Krystian Adam as Orpheus, Mariana Flores as Eurydice/Hope, Francesca Aspromonte as Music/Messenger and Gianluca Buratto as Charon/Pluto.

    When I bought a ticket I was worried that that the Royal Albert Hall was too large for a Renaissance opera. The opera has a small orchestra, and the voices should be suited to a more intimate venue. How wrong I was. Because the orchestra was small the voices projected more. And this was the quietest audience I have ever experienced, not bad for a 5000 seater. The diction and projection of the singers was incredible. I was at the back in the circle, and if I got lost in the libretto I could listen to key words from the stage and find the right line, and I don't even know Renaissance Italian!. The cavernous acoustics of the Royal Albert Hall gave this opera a most mystical sound that could not be achieved elsewhere.

    Special mention must be given to the chorus the backbone of the production. And the semi staging worked perfectly. You could hear the audience gasp when Orfeo turns back and looks at Eurydice. The big dance at the end was the icing on the cake, but you don't get to hear the audiences laughter on the BBC i Player recording, when the cast dance around Pluto. Shame the BBC didn't film this, because musically and visually this hits a home run. And you will never get to see Krystian Adam playing Orfeo as an ancient Greek Al Jolson. Just listen the the audiences reaction on the i player.

    Have a listen on the BBC Proms page http://www.bbc.co.uk/events/e548gw#b0640j4n
    I read about it and I also wished it had been filmed. Gardiner is great with semi staged opera, and he always finds the new talents for these productions, he doesn't seem to be interested in the 'star' singers. I remember the wonderful Don Giovanni from Amsterdam in the 90's, absolutely electrifying, and luckily that was televised.

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    I forgot to write about the three productions in West Edge Opera's summer festival!

    The first I saw was Il ritorno d'Ulisse in patria by Monteverdi. There were some cuts, leaving the running time just under two hours (plus one intermission). There was a nine-piece orchestra and ten singers (with a few doubling). It was presented int he gallery space at American Steel Studios in Oakland, generally a workshop/warehouse for giant steel artworks. I was a little concerned about the space but it sounded wonderful. I don't really mean to compare this boxy unacoustic space to Royal Albert Hall but, as with the reports from Loge, the small orchestra for a Monteverdi opera worked well and made it easy for the singers to be be heard clearly.

    The stage was basically an elevated U, with the orchestra in the middle. Sometimes you could only see one singer, but it was more immediate than everyone facing out, ignoring each other. I could see Ulisse (Nikolas Nackley) rather than Penelope (Sara Couden) when he finally revealed himself but it was transcendent. Kindra Scharich was also noteworthy as Minerva.


    The next day I saw Lulu by Alban Berg. This was at the 16th Street Station, abandoned after the 1989 earthquake (though it has since been deemed safe). It was cut to about 2 and a half hours, plus an intermission just before the film. Jonathan Khuner conducted his reduced orchestration (for 20 players). Sadly due to the acoustics of the space - again, empty, unacoustic - I had a difficult time hearing the singers well. Emma McNairy was still impressive in the title role, as was Philip Skinner as Dr. Schön. Between the cuts and the poor sound I was let down, though the direction (by Elkhanah Pulitzer) and physical production was effective and entertaining and it's impressive that this small opera company was able to put on this mammoth opera (selling out 500 seats for all three performances).


    The following week I went to the Oakland Metro Operahouse* for the West Coast premiere of As One. This is a 75 minute chamber opera by Laura Kaminsky with a libretto by Mark Campbell and Kimberly Reed (who also provided background film for the production). The score was performed by the Friction Quartet. This is a piece for two singers, both representing a transwoman, in sort of a before and after or male side and female side way, though they both sing throughout the piece. I really liked it and would love to hear it again; there were some really lovely parts especially as the piece moved on. The singers Dan Kempson and Brenda Patterson sounded wonderful together.

    For this production there were ten supers provided background characters - other students, her parents, etc - illustrating some of the story. This was occasionally successful, but I think the piece worked best when she went to Norway and was by herself (though this could be just because this was what the opera was building to).


    * That's actually the name... though it is mostly a metal and punk club. It's not entirely new to opera; it's grand opening was apparently in 2001 with a performance of Virgil Thomson and Gertrude Stein's Four Saints in Three Acts.


    I am very glad I went to all three. I'll keep in mind the cuts for next summer. And hope they don't actually choose 16th Street Station as their home venue for all performances (unless they do some serious renovations).

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