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Thread: Our own reviews of operas we've attended

  1. #106
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    It's a long time since I've been at the forum, and since then there've been two operas I've seen live for the first time. Cosi fan tutte (yeah, a Mozart-lover that is me has never been to it until a week ago!) and Electra. Both at my dear Mariinsky. Electra was scheduled to be conducted by Gergiev, but it was changed at the last moment, so both were conducted by Christian Knapp (Gergiev's number one understudy). Not that it bothered me.

    Well, Electra… Here you can see it's Regietheater through and through, but as the playbill promised a Wagnerian kind of music (R. Strauss is always put in the same abo with Wagner) and a cast of my favorites, I've decided I could deal with it.

    It is Regietheater, no denying it. The action takes place in a two-story building. The first floor is something like an early 20th-century house, full of light. Although its inhabitants don't boast any particularly old-fashioned costumes, aside from maybe Clytemnestra's fur mantle. Ladies wear evening dresses, gentlemen are in black suits, and the servants wear green uniform. Chrysothemis (a feeble act of protest?) is in a simple white blouse and a bright yellow skirt.

    And the ground floor can be accurately desribed as a pile of garbage, Electra's living place. The only sign of civilization is a projector that Electra uses to watch a slideshow of family photos (not one of them showing Clytemnestra). The two floors are connected with a sort of staircase made of garbage (not secured in any way, as the singer playing Clytemnestra later wrote on Facebook!).

    Okay, so, what did I think of that? Actually, after Strauss's breathtaking nerve-wracking music began, it didn't seem to bother me very much. The contrast between Electra's world and the rest of the world was shown very well. Especially when both Electra's mother and sister were speaking to Electra from their plane, too frightened to venture in the crazy woman's home. Clytemnestra only once dared to step on these garbage stairs. The tragedy of it is obvious: they think that keeping away from Electra means keeping away from madness, but they're already every bit as mad as her. Clytemnestra lost in her nightmares, and Chrysothemis – in her feverish dream of leaving the palace-turned-prison. It reminded me of a horror short story I read on the Internet, about a family forced to hide in a house for generations and gradually going unhinged.

    Back to Electra. Then there's the one major thing that annoyed me in the production: the "higher plane"'s floor wasn't straight horizontal. It was sloping. And sometimes the singers couldn't be seen behind it. Only after Electra finished her graphic description of her mother being killed in the near future, I saw that Clytemnestra has been onstage and listening to it all the time.

    The music, I repeat, was amazing. I haven't been so impressed with opera since the first times I listened to Wagner. Although I knew perfectly well the opera's quite short, I still didn't believe it when Orest appeared. I was like "what, so soon?!" For a while, I thought it was my nearsightedness playing tricks on me. So Electra and I recognized Orest for sure at about the same time.

    The drama was downplayed a bit when both murders happened offstage, with only yells and cries reaching us, but the tension came back afterwards, with Electra crazily dancing to her death. We never see the cheering crowd Chrysothemis speaks of, so a possibility remains that it was a figment of their imagination – the three mad siblings having been freed at last.

    The cast was all splendid. Larisa Gogolevskaya in particular, although the classical "fat lady", gave us a torn, raging, honestly frightening Electra. And her voice! As she sang for most of the time, I can't believe how it stayed at the same level. She has an inclination towards screaming her notes, it irritated some people in her Yaroslavna, but with a part like Electra it is only fitting.

    I wanted the post to be about both operas I've seen, but – well – Cosi fan tutte can be summed up as just another wonderful Mozartian piece with an idiotic hilarious plot. Lovely relaxation after university. Beautiful production. Sweet voices. No shocks like in the previous opera!

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  3. #107
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    I saw San Francisco Opera's Die Meistersinger von Nürnberg last night.

    I had heard a lot about Elder's conducting being slow; it did not seem that way to me. The prelude was certainly majestic, as was the Act 3 interlude, though the crowd around me had had enough and took the time to stretch and talk. It was a fantastic reading of the score, well shaped and well played by the orchestra. This was no reduced orchestration; there were 76 players in the pit along with a 14-piece band backstage. There was also the 90-person chorus, 17 principals, and 31 dancers, fighters, and supers.

    Brandon Jovanovich was stellar as Walther; his voice was rich and secure throughout and his final prize song was glorious. He also came off as more elegant than Marco Jentsch on the Glyndebourne DVD; he looked and sounded noble. I felt the same about Alek Shrader as David compared to Topi Lehtipuu on the DVD. Martin Gantner sounded good throughout his performance, even when he was messing up the prize song. The crowd was laughing, but his Beckmesser did not come off as pathetic.

    Rachel Willis-Sørensen was solid as Eva. Her acting was very good and her voice soared above the orchestra when necessary. She also had good chemistry with both Walther and Sachs, making her parts of act 2 sound lovely. Sasha Cooke sounded exceptional as Magdalene, making the most of a few moments.

    James Rutherford was a great Sachs. He gave a richly detailed performance; his act 3 monologue was moving and he shined in the finale, amazing after such a long sing.

    The production was fun (for opera, for Wagner). The setting is shifted from the mid-16th century to the early 19th century. This updates the costumes and places the action just as the Holy Roman Empire was actually dissolving. The personregie was finely detailed; the principals did not stand around waiting to sing but acted their parts and reacted to those around them. The chorus and supers were well used; there was a good amount going on without it being too busy (except during the appropriate crowd scenes).

    The crowd in the Dress Circle was awful; I have never heard that much talking during an opera. There were several people around me snoring, at least one phone went off during the performance, and I'm pretty sure someone was opening presents during act 3 scene 1. Perhaps a holiday weekend was the wrong time to go see this, or perhaps this is just going to happen at such a long opera.

    Despite the distractions I was often entranced; the opening scene pulled me in and Sachs' defense of Walther was impassioned. Eva and Walther sounded lovely together in act 2, and the chaos of the crowd scene built impressively. Walther creating the prize song was rich and the quintet glowed. The final scene was a glory to see.

    I might go again on Tuesday.
    Last edited by mountmccabe; Nov-28-2015 at 19:58.

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  5. #108
    Senior Member howlingfantods's Avatar
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    Just saw the same Meistersinger as mountmccabe yesterday. Same production as the Glyndebourne, so it all seemed very familiar--I don't recall if the Glyndebourne on disc had quite so much acrobatics, but it was all very fun to watch.

    I like the time shift to 19th century. It kind of reminds me of how MASH was very much a Vietnam story, but presented as a Korean War setting--setting something in the past to comment on the present at a more comfortable remove. Wagner's thoughts about aesthetics, musical structure and inspiration seemed like very contemporary-to-him thoughts about Romanticism and his own artistic career.

    Of the three main principals, I was most impressed by Sorensen as Eva. Her voice is a little dark and mezzo-sounding for an ideal Eva, but she was excellent, secure in all her notes and charming, exasperated, coquettish and all the things that Eva needs to be, with a surprisingly large voice. Rutherford was very good as Walt, certainly much better than Jentzsch in the Glyndebourne video. Very good top, sung passionately and well acted. He tends to sing everything at one volume, his lower end was a little lacking in force and weight and he made a couple of minor errors in the Preislied but overall a very good performance.

    Rutherford as Sachs was not great, but they also announced at the A3 act break that he had been suffering a serious cold, so that could explain it. His voice was spreading a little close to something dangerous like a wobble under pressure, his low end was MIA and overall the volume and force was something well below what I would want from an ideal Sachs. Well acted though.

    Shrader and Cooke were great as Magdalene and David--Shrader being a little less weedy than some tenors they cast for the role, which is definitely welcome, and Cooke doing her usual good work but maybe being a bit small--I could barely hear her at all in the quintet but maybe that was just where I was sitting.

    The conducting was a little odd--some strangely blaring and out of nowhere peaks, like Elder couldn't resist the urge to occasionally make a big racket. Was a little draggy at the start of Act 3, and overall didn't quite have that great sense of gemutlichkeit that is the major divider between a good and a great performance of the work. Some of the choral work in particular wasn't ideal, although they were tremendously fun to watch--I couldn't help thinking that they focused on the on-stage activity at the expense of better choral sound.
    Last edited by howlingfantods; Dec-07-2015 at 20:28.

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  7. #109
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    Last night I saw SF Opera's double bill of operas based on Poe's The Fall of the House of Usher. This was the US premiere of Gordon Getty's Usher House and the US professional premiere of Robert Orledge's completion of La chute de la maison Usher by Claude Debussy.

    This was a co-production with Welsh National Opera that premiered in Cardiff in June 2014. The Director was David Pountney.


    Usher House is a sort of buddy comedy version of Poe's gothic horror story. Getty noted in both the in-person interview before the performance and in the interview printed in the program that he made "the three principal characters the good guys... the kind of people you'd want your children to marry." I don't think this was successful, in part because he retained some of the elements of Poe's story.

    When Eddie Poe (Getty cast Poe as the visiting friend) visits Roderick Usher they greet each other warmly, boon companions chatting about old school chums. Edgar is in great spirits after his easy and refreshing journey so Roderick spills his great surprise, a ball in Edgar's honor! Roderick announces the arrival of his ancestors, and they dance around, seemingly having a good time, as images of the ancestors show up on the video projections. It neither makes sense why Roderick would do this nor why Edgar would go along with it so playfully.

    They are disrupted by the appearance of the doctor and Madeline Usher, the latter represented by a silent dancer Jamielyn Duggan. The wild dancing of Madeline was impressive, and evocatively chilly. It seemed out of place, though.

    Anthony Reed got to chew scenery and the best vocal music of the piece as Doctor Primus, the villain created for the piece. His evil machinations felt like a Doctor Who story, without the fun or meaning I'd expect from that TV series, but his rich bass voice sold him as a super villain.

    The vocal writing other than those sections for the doctor was largely uninteresting. There were some wordless vocals from Jacqueline Piccolino as the voice of Madeline Usher, but they were used sparingly and as a little bit of color, not as a way to tell the story. The orchestra didn't seem to evoke any mood, though the constantly varying tone throughout did not make that any easier. The direction was also bizarre, even for opera; characters walked off-stage for no apparent reason, to return only when they had another line.

    The videos were warm and richly detailed; I found them slightly distracting at first but they effectively showed a sense of place.

    ---

    La chute de la maison Usher was an incredible contrast. This was actually a gothic horror opera. The videos were simply composed exterior, then interior shots of the stone house, ominous and foreboding. They made the House of Usher feel claustrophobic and oppressive.

    The music was richly detail and evocative; the orchestra was a presence rather than an accompaniment.

    Here Brian Mulligan had wrenching, emotional music that he used to create the tormented character of Roderick Usher. Edward Nelson was similarly impressive as the unnamed friend. The opera being dominated by these two baritone roles fit well with the overall atmosphere. Tenor Joel Sorensen was a mannered Le Médecin, and the few lines from Jacqueline Piccolino as Lady Madeline that opened the piece were lovely.

    The direction was meaningful; characters interacted, and if they left the stage it was for stated or otherwise clear reason (I know, low bar).

    I am not ready to place this work next to Pelléas et Mélisande, and I don't know enough of about what Debussy left or the other orchestrations or completions to comment on Robert Orledge's work here, but it does sound like Debussy.


    I would love to see La chute de la maison Usher again, though either on its own or with a more appropriate pairing. It sure has me listening to a long playlist of his music this morning!
    Last edited by mountmccabe; Dec-09-2015 at 21:18. Reason: Playlist note!

  8. #110
    Senior Member Cavaradossi's Avatar
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    sort of buddy comedy version of Poe's gothic horror story
    Whaaa? How? Why? About as good an idea as Hamlet, the Musical.
    Poe and Debussy, on the other hand, sounds like a potent combination.


    You may be also interested in Philip Glass's effort on the subject:
    Glass "House of Usher" kicks off new era at Chicago Opera Theater

  9. #111
    Senior Member DavidA's Avatar
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    Just seen Cav and Pag broadcast from Covent Garden. I hope to post a review soon but if you missed the live broadcast do try and see the Encore screening as it's a terrific evening's entertainment. Real Italian verismo dne for all its worth!

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    Senior Member DavidA's Avatar
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    The twin terrors "Cav" and Pag" were broadcast live from ROH Covent Garden last night. With the caveat that cinema staff don't appear to know when to turn the lights on and off the show went well. This is a new production by Damiano Michieletto, whose Tell outraged the public last time. However, this time he showed what he can do when he does things to entertain rather than outrage. He's updated them to a small town in Southern Italy, linking them together rather cleverly.
    The productions themselves are pretty straightforward, the only real deviation being (in Pag) a drunken Canio seeing part of the play-within-a-play as his drunken imagination. Quite ingenious but I'm not quite sure if it worked.
    As for the performances, Aleksandrs Antonenko sings both Turridu and Canio as a modern incarnation of del Monaco - high on virile tone (which did strain at times) but short on subtlety and imagination. Con Belto personified! Dimitri Platanias similarly doubles as Alfio and Tonio, with Carmen Giannattasio singing and acting well as Nedda.
    The stars of the evening for me were first Eva-Maria Westbroek’s Santuzza, exacting believable emotions from the character, and Tony Pappano in the pit. He has this music in his blood and it showed with terrific playing with a wide range of colours. Whatever the operas lacked in subtlety they made up for in excitement.
    A rip roaring evening indeed! Do see it if you have the chance!
    Last edited by DavidA; Dec-11-2015 at 21:11.

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  12. #113
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    Peter Grimes by Benjamin Britten

    Theater an der Wien - 12 December 2015

    A new production

    Conductor: Cornelius Meister
    Director: Christof Loy
    Set design: Johannes Leiacker
    Costume design: Judith Weihrauch
    Choreography: Thomas Wilhelm
    Light design: Bernd Purkrabek

    Peter Grimes: Joseph Kaiser
    Ellen Orford: Agneta Eichenholz
    Auntie: Hanna Schwarz
    Niece 1: Kiandra Howarth
    Niece 2: Frederikke Kampmann
    Balstrode: Andrew Foster-Williams
    Mrs. Sedley: Rosalind Plowright
    Swallow: Stefan Cerny
    Bob Boles: Andreas Conrad
    Revered Horace Adams: Erik Årman
    Ned Keene: Tobias Greenhalgh
    Hobson: Lukas Jakobski
    John, Grimes' apprentice: Gieorgij Puchalski
    Orchestra: ORF Radio-Symphonieorchester Wien
    Chorus: Arnold Schoenberg Chor

    ---------------------------------------------------------

    This was a very different Peter Grimes from the ones which I've seen live and watched on DVD.

    Minimalist setting. Most of the time there was just Grimes' bed, which (scarily) partly hung over the edge of the stage. There were random chairs and a couch but that's about it. The stage was very steeply raked and except for a tiddly bit of net in front of the bed, there was no safety net. Some of the action was violent and strenuous and I was worried that someone would land in the pit.

    Grimes is unambiguously gay. There's lots of sex; his relationship with the apprentice is sometimes violent, sometimes tender but he's undoubtedly a pederast.

    The apprentice is an adolescent rather than a child and is on stage a considerable amount of time. He's aged about 15 and several of the Borough citizens also find him irresistible.

    Balstrode is gay and has a tortured relationship with Grimes but Balstrode also lusts after the apprentice and at one point nearly succeeds in having his way with him, but is interrupted by Grimes. Balstrode dons the jersey with the anchor 'that she knitted' and at the very end lays back on Peter's bed, a broken man. Balstrode is not portrayed as the upright, respected, non-judgemental citizen he usually is. He's quite sleazy and creepy but it works very well.

    Ellen Orford is a man – well I think she/he is; I'm a bit dim sometimes with my interpretation. She/he definitely loves Grimes but not only wants to care for the apprentice, she/he also lusts after him too.

    Jim Hobson is probably gay. He's a tormented soul who pines for one of the Borough boys but manages to resist temptation (maybe).

    All the roles were brilliantly sung and with excellent diction but what can you say about Rosalind Plowright which hasn't already been said? Total legend!

    Joseph Kaiser's portrayal of a paranoid loner's descent into madness was one of the finest performances I've ever seen. It was totally believable and gut wrenching. Poor guy looked quite drained at the end.

    Choir and orchestra were outstanding. The end of Act III Scene 1, where the Borough mob go hunting for Grimes, was superb. The mob stood right at the very front of the stage, in darkness, shining their torches and roaring "Peter Grimes" "Peter Grimes" with perfect silence in between the shouts. Stunning and spine chilling.

    The audience absolutely loved it and went bonkers and Joseph Kaiser got a well deserved huge ovation. Curtain calls went on for ages.

    This little video from ORF will give a flavour.

    Photos from Theater an der Wien facebook here
    Ann

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  14. #114
    Senior Member Don Fatale's Avatar
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    ^^^^^^^

    I thought this would be the angle of the production, having seen the poster.

    I guess it's good to know that Peter Grimes survives the production, so to speak. However I'd rather see an orthodox production.

    Hope you're having a good time in Vienna, Annie, assuming you're still there.
    Last edited by Don Fatale; Dec-14-2015 at 00:32.

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    Cav/Pag Royal Opera House

    A fantastic updated version set within the last 30 years. The director replaces old school verismo with modern Italian Neo-Realism. Both operas take place in the same village in Sicily on the same day. Cavalleria has a revolving set of an interior of a bakers and the exterior of the street. While Pagliacci has a revolving set of a very utilitarian school hall and changing room. Characters from each opera appear in the other opera, For example we first meet Nedda and Silvio (who is the local baker) during the intermezzo of Cav. Won't give too much away about the appearance of the Cav cast in Pagliacci because that is one of the most moving scenes in this production.

    The cast were excellent, but the stand out was Yonghoon Lee singing Turiddu for one day only. With a leather jacket and swagger he looked like John Travolta in Grease. His final aria to his mother was beautifully sung. He got a rapturous reception at the curtain call. Plenty of memorable moments Alfio driving a battered Alfa Romeo onstage, the statue of the Madonna coming to life during the Easter hymn, a very amusing kids passion play in Pag and Canio in Pag being chased down corridors by his own jealousies.

    As always the chorus and orchestra brought this production together. If you can get a ticket go see it. It felt like watching a movie. One of the most enjoyable afternoons of opera.

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  17. #116
    Senior Member Don Fatale's Avatar
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    Nadine Sierra does the bis-ness in Milan
    (She should be tweeting #Livingthedream)

    Rigoletto
    La Scala, Milan
    17th March 2016

    Despite several previous visits to Milan on business in the 90’s I failed to find time to get to La Scala. Today I was able to rectify this omission, although it could be said it was half done when I secured a ticket via their internet ticket sales several months ago. I wanted my first La Scala visit to be a classic La Scala opera, preferably Verdi, with a traditional production, and this performance of Rigoletto was ideal. I was at the 2nd performance of this run.

    With Leo Nucci in the title role (I read he’s done over 500 performances!), Vittorio Grigolo as the Duke and American Nadine Sierra debuting as Gilda the casting had a mixture of youth and experience. My review of the two males is superfluous, they’re both supreme in their respective roles. Nadine Sierra proves to have a capable voice (she didn’t get this gig from a ballot obviously). It’s a soft and consistent voice which never seems to drop a note, unlike Grigolo I noticed twice. I’d have likes a few more floating off notes in the Act 1 duet with her dad. The Duke/Gilda duet was very sweetly sung, making me notice it anew. How long before they’re doing Boheme together I wonder?

    The second act (you know, the one without any famous tunes) was scintillating, culminating in the rousing cabaleta/duet finale “Si, vendetta.”

    At the end-of-act curtain bows, Nucci and Nadine Sierra get a long ovation with many shouts of bis heard as they stand in each other’s arms, so much like a father and daughter might. Suddenly Nadine becomes very animated, bouncing with childish glee - the superintendent in the stage box has given the nod. “Si Vendetta” gets a repeat in front of the curtain! What a special moment, and quite rare for La Scala, and hasn’t happened at a Verdi opera since * (see footnote).

    How much this moment was deserved is hard to say. I cannot say the performance was exceptional.

    The third act was (despite the big tunes) was perfunctory in comparison to previous. Nadine Sierra’s voice struggled against a full orchestra.

    * It seems this happened at the opening performance on Wednesday too. See clip below. Curiously, at the second performance (mine), the applause was far longer and wilder and the decision to repeat seemed more spontaneous. The last time this happened in a Verdi opera was 30 years ago.

    Last edited by Don Fatale; Jan-17-2016 at 23:31.

  18. #117
    Senior Member Belowpar's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Don Fatale View Post
    Nadine Sierra does the bis-ness in Milan
    (She should be tweeting #Livingthedream)

    Rigoletto
    La Scala, Milan
    17th March 2016

    Despite several previous visits to Milan on business in the 90’s I failed to find time to get to La Scala. Today I was able to rectify this omission, although it could be said it was half done when I secured a ticket via their internet ticket sales several months ago. I wanted my first La Scala visit to be a classic La Scala opera, preferably Verdi, with a traditional production, and this performance of Rigoletto was ideal. I was at the 2nd performance of this run.

    With Leo Nucci in the title role (I read he’s done over 500 performances!), Vittorio Grigolo as the Duke and American Nadine Sierra debuting as Gilda the casting had a mixture of youth and experience. My review of the two males is superfluous, they’re both supreme in their respective roles. Nadine Sierra proves to have a capable voice (she didn’t get this gig from a ballot obviously). It’s a soft and consistent voice which never seems to drop a note, unlike Grigolo I noticed twice. I’d have likes a few more floating off notes in the Act 1 duet with her dad. The Duke/Gilda duet was very sweetly sung, making me notice it anew. How long before they’re doing Boheme together I wonder?

    The second act (you know, the one without any famous tunes) was scintillating, culminating in the rousing cabaleta/duet finale “Si, vendetta.”

    At the end-of-act curtain bows, Nucci and Nadine Sierra get a long ovation with many shouts of bis heard as they stand in each other’s arms, so much like a father and daughter might. Suddenly Nadine becomes very animated, bouncing with childish glee - the superintendent in the stage box has given the nod. “Si Vendetta” gets a repeat in front of the curtain! What a special moment, and quite rare for La Scala, and hasn’t happened at a Verdi opera since * (see footnote).

    How much this moment was deserved is hard to say. I cannot say the performance was exceptional.

    The third act was (despite the big tunes) was perfunctory in comparison to previous. Nadine Sierra’s voice struggled against a full orchestra.

    * It seems this happened at the opening performance on Wednesday too. See clip below. Curiously, at the second performance (mine), the applause was far longer and wilder and the decision to repeat seemed more spontaneous. The last time this happened in a Verdi opera was 30 years ago.

    Wow. If you go enough you'll see some special things, but as a way to cap your first visit to La Scala that takes some beating.

    Thanks for posting.

  19. #118
    Senior Member sospiro's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Don Fatale View Post
    Nadine Sierra does the bis-ness in Milan
    (She should be tweeting #Livingthedream)

    Rigoletto
    La Scala, Milan
    17th March 2016

    Despite several previous visits to Milan on business in the 90’s I failed to find time to get to La Scala. Today I was able to rectify this omission, although it could be said it was half done when I secured a ticket via their internet ticket sales several months ago. I wanted my first La Scala visit to be a classic La Scala opera, preferably Verdi, with a traditional production, and this performance of Rigoletto was ideal. I was at the 2nd performance of this run.

    With Leo Nucci in the title role (I read he’s done over 500 performances!), Vittorio Grigolo as the Duke and American Nadine Sierra debuting as Gilda the casting had a mixture of youth and experience. My review of the two males is superfluous, they’re both supreme in their respective roles. Nadine Sierra proves to have a capable voice (she didn’t get this gig from a ballot obviously). It’s a soft and consistent voice which never seems to drop a note, unlike Grigolo I noticed twice. I’d have likes a few more floating off notes in the Act 1 duet with her dad. The Duke/Gilda duet was very sweetly sung, making me notice it anew. How long before they’re doing Boheme together I wonder?

    The second act (you know, the one without any famous tunes) was scintillating, culminating in the rousing cabaleta/duet finale “Si, vendetta.”

    At the end-of-act curtain bows, Nucci and Nadine Sierra get a long ovation with many shouts of bis heard as they stand in each other’s arms, so much like a father and daughter might. Suddenly Nadine becomes very animated, bouncing with childish glee - the superintendent in the stage box has given the nod. “Si Vendetta” gets a repeat in front of the curtain! What a special moment, and quite rare for La Scala, and hasn’t happened at a Verdi opera since * (see footnote).

    How much this moment was deserved is hard to say. I cannot say the performance was exceptional.

    The third act was (despite the big tunes) was perfunctory in comparison to previous. Nadine Sierra’s voice struggled against a full orchestra.

    * It seems this happened at the opening performance on Wednesday too. See clip below. Curiously, at the second performance (mine), the applause was far longer and wilder and the decision to repeat seemed more spontaneous. The last time this happened in a Verdi opera was 30 years ago.



    Brilliant.
    So pleased you got to see a traditional Verdi at La Scala and you were there for this rare 'bis'.

    PS Where was your seat? Did you have a good view?
    Last edited by sospiro; Jan-18-2016 at 07:35.
    Ann

  20. #119
    Senior Member Don Fatale's Avatar
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    I was in the second row of the prima galleria, almost centre. I thought I'd have a pillar obstructing part of the state, but had a full view. A good acoustic too. It's pretty cosy up there but the people around me were very nice.The glow of the subtitles boxes can be annoying, particularly given that these were mainly Italians listening to an Italian opera. The seat was €60. I would not hesitate to return! Although this required an internet trigger finger to get the ticket, as the seat had all but gone after 1 minute of public internet booking.
    Last edited by Don Fatale; Jan-18-2016 at 08:20.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Don Fatale View Post
    I was in the second row of the prima galleria, almost centre. I thought I'd have a pillar obstructing part of the state, but had a full view. A good acoustic too. It's pretty cosy up there but the people around me were very nice.The glow of the subtitles boxes can be annoying, particularly given that these were mainly Italians listening to an Italian opera. The seat was €60. I would not hesitate to return! Although this required an internet trigger finger to get the ticket, as the seat had all but gone after 1 minute of public internet booking.
    Excellent! Scary booking though, if you've already booked your flight!!
    Ann

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