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Thread: UK or US Terminology?

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    New Member Pianoforte's Avatar
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    Default UK or US Terminology?

    While learning music theory I'm getting confused over the terminology because I'm using a number of different training materials and some are UK and some US. Whats the preference when first learning the notes in terms of calling them Minim, Crochet etc or quater note, half note etc. Would it be good practice in the early days to stick to one or learn both and associate them with each other as I progress?

    Kind Regards,

    Jamie

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    Member Drowning_by_numbers's Avatar
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    In the UK they are known as crochet minim etc. but I understand the opposite is true in the US. Personally in the UK I don't see the need for the half note etc method. Hope this helps a little

    Becky

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    for me, it's - whole, half, quarter, eighth, etc. i like it.

    dj

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    American is over simplified, has not history and is limited (especially in Roman Numerals), and repeats unnecessary information. And so are is their music theory.

    Could I get moar funny?

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    Andante
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    I think the quaver/crotchet terminology is more widely used to day, but I may be wrong and the standard pulse is the crotchet, but as Yagen Kiely points out the US does tend to change things just for the sake of change or just simple bloody mindedness, so they would go for some thing that is at odds with the rest . So long as you do it right what does it matter, a rose is a rose is a rose.
    PS Yagens last post gives the impression that a little too much Red Wine has been taken lol

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    I never drink! Hate the stuff.

    I just like reading ED...

    for me, it's - whole, half, quarter, eighth, etc. i like it.

    dj
    An American using US terminology*. Never thought I'd see it!


    *Currupted words.

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    ...and a most vile pox upon the metric system!!!!!

    dj

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    I took a british system of theory for a while, and the easiest thing I can recommend is to become familar with both. It's a pain, but if you are in music for the long run (as I assume you are) it's a good idea.

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    Senior Member Novelette's Avatar
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    I think it's useful to be familiar with both manners of terminology, especially if you enjoy reading books and articles about theory. While you're at it, it's also a good idea to learn well the mid-range clefs. If you really want to have some fun, you could also learn the rules of Renaissance ligature notation.

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    Senior Member (Ret) moody's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Novelette View Post
    I think it's useful to be familiar with both manners of terminology, especially if you enjoy reading books and articles about theory. While you're at it, it's also a good idea to learn well the mid-range clefs. If you really want to have some fun, you could also learn the rules of Renaissance ligature notation.
    Did you go to the graveyard to find this thread ?
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    Senior Member Novelette's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by moody View Post
    Did you go to the graveyard to find this thread ?
    When someone suggested that we should have a discussion about revivals of older classical music, I thought they meant we should have revivals of older classical music discussions!

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    Senior Member ahammel's Avatar
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    I learned the American naming conventions for rhythms, and I have to say that it makes a fair bit more sense than the British system. It's pretty easy to remember that a quarter-note is a note that lasts for a quarter of a bar (in common time). But then, 'crochet' is easier and more fun to say.

    It gets a bit silly when you get down to quasihemidemisemiquavers, but then, 'hundred twenty-eigth note' sounds pretty silly too.

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    Quote Originally Posted by ahammel View Post
    I learned the American naming conventions for rhythms, and I have to say that it makes a fair bit more sense than the British system. It's pretty easy to remember that a quarter-note is a note that lasts for a quarter of a bar (in common time). But then, 'crochet' is easier and more fun to say.

    It gets a bit silly when you get down to quasihemidemisemiquavers, but then, 'hundred twenty-eigth note' sounds pretty silly too.
    No, quasihemidemisemiquavers is definitely more silly sounding. There is no sense of musical rhythmic proportion in the word, it's just a bunch of prefixes. If you said hemidemisemiquasiquavers, people probably wouldn't notice the difference. Might as well say centiquavers, milliquavers, microquavers for how much people in Europe love their metric system!

    I could never say minim or crochet for musical terms. They sound like sewing terms.

    I'm curious: how would you say double-dotted triplet 16th note in that other system?
    Last edited by Huilunsoittaja; Jan-01-2014 at 20:27.
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    Senior Member ahammel's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Huilunsoittaja View Post
    I'm curious: how would you say double-dotted triplet 16th note in that other system?
    Double-dotted triplet semiquaver, presumably.

    More usually pronounced, "what kind of a sadistic lunatic wrote this rhythm?" in either system.

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