Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 21

Thread: The Lute.

  1. #1
    Senior Member Mark Harwood's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Isle of Arran, Scotland.
    Posts
    284
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default The Lute.

    I thought I'd start a thread for the lute, rather than adding to the solo repertoire thread, because I hope to have a substantial amount of correspondence from people who know a lot more than I do.
    So, to roll the ball, I'll just state why the lute deserves attention.
    As a solo instrument, it was dominant in parts of Europe at a time of musical adventure, discovery and refinement; hence the high-quality repertoire. Renaissance and Baroque composers, makers and players did some outstanding work with this instrument.
    It sounds simply wonderful.
    Julian Bream plays it.
    I hope to be more specific as well as a little more perceptive in future posts, but for now I only invite enthusiasts, practitioners and collectors to contribute.
    "Music is a social act of communication among people, a gesture of friendship, the strongest there is."
    - Malcolm Arnold.

  2. #2
    Senior Member Methodistgirl's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    112
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Mark there are all kinds of lutes out there from Asia to Kentucky with the
    mandolin. Can you be a little more specific?
    judy tooley

  3. #3
    Senior Member Mark Harwood's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Isle of Arran, Scotland.
    Posts
    284
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    I refer to the European lute, as played in the 16th to 18th Centuries. Renaissance and Baroque types differed, particularly in the number of string courses, but that's the type I like so much. Thanks for asking, Judy.
    "Music is a social act of communication among people, a gesture of friendship, the strongest there is."
    - Malcolm Arnold.

  4. #4
    Senior Member BuddhaBandit's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Philly-delphia, PA
    Posts
    512
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    It's unfortunate that much lute music is now almost always arranged and performed on guitar. While many of those transcriptions are very good, there's still nothing like hearing an actual lute.

    Note: The oft-pretentious Sting (think: Dream of the Blue Turtles) recently released a lute album of songs by John Dowland, which is actually not bad.
    Take a look at the Bandit's blog, Americana Avenue.

  5. Likes Larkenfield liked this post
  6. #5
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Posts
    19
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default ronn mcfarlane

    check out Ronn McFarlane's new CD INDIGO ROAD. it is performed on the lute.. entirely! AWesome stuff..

    He will be interviewed on PERFORMANCE TODAY tomorrow April 18 so check your local stations for times...! He'll be talking about Indigo Road and they'll play tunes from it and from his early music recordings, too.

  7. #6
    Newbies
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Romania
    Posts
    2
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    You should also try Rolf Lislevand's "La belle homicide". A lot of beautiful lute pieces by underrated composers from 17th century.

  8. #7
    Senior Member Mark Harwood's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Isle of Arran, Scotland.
    Posts
    284
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Thanks for the recommendations, Lute Lover & Hippogryph. I've listened to samples of Ronn McFarlane & checked out Mr. Lislevand's disc. I'll be ordering the latter.
    "Music is a social act of communication among people, a gesture of friendship, the strongest there is."
    - Malcolm Arnold.

  9. #8
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    16
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    I like lute music. Though, unless I've been looking in the wrong places, the choice at the moment seems to be Dowland or Dowland. I've got a cheerful disc of Konrad Ragossnig doing a whole list of tiny pieces by Europeans I've never heard of, and Goran Sollscher's recording of the Bach Lute Suites on a guitar (admittedly an eleven-string affair he had made for the purpose, but still a guitar). I went to a concert to see, I think, Nigel North many years ago, and that was fun - I don't remember much about it, except I got to see a theorbo, and that doesn't happen every day.

    For the last year or two, I've been enjoying the occasional "Lutecast" at http://lutecast.blogspot.com, which is well worth a visit.

  10. Likes Barbebleu liked this post
  11. #9
    Senior Member Mark Harwood's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Isle of Arran, Scotland.
    Posts
    284
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Thank you for the link, Burbage. Much appreciated.
    I have a four-CD set of Konrad Ragossnig's lute playing: The Rosette Collection, Renaissance Lute Music. It covers styles from different parts of Europe, "tiny pieces" as you call them, and it's full of delights.
    Weiss's Baroque works are perhaps more substantial, and I'm collecting them as played by Robert Barto, on the Naxos label.
    I'd also recommend Julian Bream: The Golden Age Of English Lute Music. Just one disc, full of life.
    "Music is a social act of communication among people, a gesture of friendship, the strongest there is."
    - Malcolm Arnold.

  12. Likes Barbebleu liked this post
  13. #10
    Senior Member purple99's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    London, UK
    Posts
    176
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Keep a lookout for the liuto attiorbato. Midway between a standard lute and a theorbo, with thick strings and a deep, aggressive sound. Tremendous for Bach lute suites, and for continuo when you don’t want the sparkle of a harpsichord. For some reason they were much loved by rich Italians, so tend to be highly decorated.



    Here’s one used in a Forqueray viola da gamba suit: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Av20FgeJIok

  14. #11
    Senior Member Mark Harwood's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Isle of Arran, Scotland.
    Posts
    284
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Thanks, purple99. I hadn't heard the liuto attiorbato before. With the viola da gamba it makes a huge sound. Fine music that is too. You've given me a fresh line of enquiry!
    "Music is a social act of communication among people, a gesture of friendship, the strongest there is."
    - Malcolm Arnold.

  15. #12
    Senior Member purple99's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    London, UK
    Posts
    176
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Mark Harwood View Post
    Thanks, purple99. I hadn't heard the liuto attiorbato before. With the viola da gamba it makes a huge sound. Fine music that is too. You've given me a fresh line of enquiry!
    Welcome sir. Here's the same lutanist playing solo de Visée. Notice the thick neck - you need big hands - plus the secondary bank of bass strings strung to the top of the neck (like a theorbo). I heard one live recently in a big chapel, and it filled it quite happily. They're big, aggressive instruments, different from the stereotypical soft-voiced lute.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=E894DQJJn0s

  16. #13
    Senior Member Mark Harwood's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Isle of Arran, Scotland.
    Posts
    284
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    That's a muscular sound, but I'm sure it has the capacity to be soft too. Great stuff.
    "Music is a social act of communication among people, a gesture of friendship, the strongest there is."
    - Malcolm Arnold.

  17. #14
    Senior Member JeffD's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2017
    Location
    Upstate New York
    Posts
    641
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by BuddhaBandit View Post
    Note: The oft-pretentious Sting (think: Dream of the Blue Turtles) recently released a lute album of songs by John Dowland, which is actually not bad.
    How did I become a senior member? I only recently figured out where the restrooms are.

  18. #15
    Senior Member jegreenwood's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2015
    Location
    NYC
    Posts
    2,560
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Mark Harwood View Post
    Thank you for the link, Burbage. Much appreciated.
    I have a four-CD set of Konrad Ragossnig's lute playing: The Rosette Collection, Renaissance Lute Music. It covers styles from different parts of Europe, "tiny pieces" as you call them, and it's full of delights.
    Weiss's Baroque works are perhaps more substantial, and I'm collecting them as played by Robert Barto, on the Naxos label.
    I'd also recommend Julian Bream: The Golden Age Of English Lute Music. Just one disc, full of life.
    For those who can't get their fill of Weiss, a nice - and even cheaper - alternative to the Barto.

    71b8l-Y-cOL._SL1000_.jpg

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Lute music scores for Indigo Road!
    By Lute Lover in forum Recorded Music and Publications
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: Nov-13-2007, 17:12

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •