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Thread: Orlande de Lassus

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    Senior Member Blake's Avatar
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    Default Orlande de Lassus

    MI0002862571.jpg
    1530-1594

    Renaissance composer Orlande de Lassus was born in Mons and got his start as a choirboy. An often disputed story has the child Lassus kidnapped three times on account of his beautiful singing voice; the only certainty is that by 1544 he had joined the service of Ferrante Gonzaga, Viceroy of Sicily. A stopover in Mantua allowed Lassus to absorb prevailing Italian influences. Lassus spent less than a year in Sicily and transferred to Milan for the remainder of the 1540s. He often used an Italian form of his name, Orlando di Lasso. In 1551, Lassus was made choirmaster at St. John of Lateran in Rome, but remained only until 1553, being succeeded by Palestrina. Lassus returned to Mons in 1554, receiving word that his parents were ill, but upon his arrival found them already dead and buried. In 1555, Lassus' first book of madrigals and a collection of various secular works appeared simultaneously in Antwerp and Venice, thus beginning his status as a one-man industry of musical publications. Lassus' work accounts for three-fifths of all music printed in Europe between 1555 and 1600.

    In 1557, the German Duke Albrecht V engaged Lassus' services as a singer at the court in Munich. Lassus' status was upgraded to Kapellmeister in 1561. His position enabled considerable travel, and Lassus made frequent trips to Venice, where he met and made friends with the Gabrielis. Judging from the range of settings, both sacred and secular, coming from Lassus in these years, it is apparent he was asked to supply music for a wide variety of events at the court of Duke Albrecht. The flood of published editions, both authorized and not, of Lassus' music during this time established him as the most popular composer in Europe, and in 1574 he was made a Knight of the Golden Spur by Pope Gregory XIII.

    In 1579, Duke Albrecht V died, and the longstanding extravagance of his court left his successor, Duke Wilhelm, with little choice but to make deep cuts in the entertainment budget. This had a direct and negative effect on Lassus' fortunes, but nonetheless he declined an offer in 1580 to relocate to the Court at Dresden. By the late 1580s, the number of new pieces Lassus undertook began to slow down. In the months before his death, Lassus succeeded in bringing to life his last great masterwork, the Lagrime di San Pietro, in itself a summation of the highest forms of Renaissance musical art. He died at about the age of 62, and in 1604 his sons published an edition of his collected works entitled Magnus opus musicum. This was used as the basis for the first modern edition of Lassus' music, published in Leipzig between 1894 and 1926.

    Among his key works, the Sibylline Prophecies (1553) and Penitential Psalms (1560) reflect the influence of Italian mannerism. While later music contains occasional chromatic alterations, mature Lassus works favor a unique style that combines an intensely dramatic sense of text painting, nervous and excited rhythmic figurations, and glorious, rolling counterpoint. Late works demonstrate a concern for terseness in expression, and texts are realized in a highly compressed state. No verifiable instrumental music is known from Lassus, and his masses are generally considered unfavorably in light of Palestrina's achievement in that realm. But his other works -- motets, madrigals, French chansons, and German lieder -- are considered second to none in the context of the late Renaissance, and several of his secular songs were known from king to peasant in the second half of the sixteenth century.

    - As seen on allmusic.com


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    Last edited by Blake; Dec-19-2013 at 05:33.

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    One of my favourite composers. I'm especially keen on the Lagrime di San Pietro, and the Penitential Psalms.

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    Senior Member Blake's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mandryka View Post
    One of my favourite composers. I'm especially keen on the Lagrime di San Pietro, and the Penitential Psalms.
    The Penitential Psalms done by the Collegium Vocale Gent is magnificent.

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    Senior Member deprofundis's Avatar
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    I just heard Prophetiae sybillium from Orlando de lassus, quite experimental for the time this stuff is pre Gesualdo experiment, i got to get some material from this guy.

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    Senior Member deprofundis's Avatar
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    I would like to point out, i heard Orlande de Lassus had left no instrumental music dose it mean he did not writhe some instrumental , i would love to hear his rare instrumental works if it exist somewhere?

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    Senior Member Biwa's Avatar
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    Susanne un jour - Stimmwerck

    This recording of Lassus's mass "Susanne un jour" by Stimmwerck can be warmly recommended. They are joined by La Villanella Basel, who also provide tasteful instrumental accompaniment in various works by Lassus's contemporaries. The 5.1 surround sound has ambient rear channels, which provide a deep soundstage.

    Here's some further reading... http://www.musica-dei-donum.org/cd_r...s_AE10053.html
    Last edited by Biwa; Aug-10-2015 at 14:06.

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    Senior Member regenmusic's Avatar
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    Default Orlande de Lassus

    Just discovered him due to Psalmi poenitentialis.

    He lived 1530/32? – 1594.



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    Senior Member regenmusic's Avatar
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    Listed to the 25 to 26 minute mark of "Orlando di Lasso Sacred Vocal Works,"
    especially the segment around 25:30



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    Senior Member deprofundis's Avatar
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    I most get a cd of penitential psalm look awesome indeed, great composer great music, one of my favorite composer of the moment has far has i can tell and Lagrime di san pietro is hudge sutch a works make the angels whipe tears of joy.

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    Senior Member Chronochromie's Avatar
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    So recently I've been enjoying these recordings of the Penitential Psalms, Prophetiae Sibyllarum and Lagrime and they've become some of my favorite works from the Renaissance:







    Anyone know any more essential Lassus works/recordings that I should check out? He seems to have written a ton of stuff.

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    Senior Member Kjetil Heggelund's Avatar
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    You listed my favorite guy for Lassus, Philippe Herreweghe Also try the Cantiones Sacrae for 6 voices!

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    Senior Member Marc's Avatar
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    Since it's the Holy Week, I listened today to Lassus' Hieremiae Prophetae Lamentationes. Performed by La Chapelle Royale & Philippe Herreweghe.
    What an awesome piece of work, beauty and 'gravitas' merged into one whole.

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    Senior Member jegreenwood's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by regenmusic View Post
    Just discovered him due to Psalmi poenitentialis.

    He lived 1530/32? – 1594.


    The Hilliard Ensemble’s recording was one of my first Early Music CD purchase. Alas, the discs bronzed. Then EMI/Virgin/Warner/whoever’s next packaged them with six more discs for quite likely less money than I paid for two discs in the 80’s. Looks like the price has doubled on Amazon since I purchased the set earlier this year. Presto is somewhat better.

    https://www.prestomusic.com/classica...liard%20Lassus

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    Senior Member Malx's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jegreenwood View Post
    The Hilliard Ensemble’s recording was one of my first Early Music CD purchase. Alas, the discs bronzed. Then EMI/Virgin/Warner/whoever’s next packaged them with six more discs for quite likely less money than I paid for two discs in the 80’s. Looks like the price has doubled on Amazon since I purchased the set earlier this year. Presto is somewhat better.

    https://www.prestomusic.com/classica...liard%20Lassus
    That Hilliard box is a fabulous bargain.

    Just noticed that the current Presto price is double what I paid back in 2017.
    Last edited by Malx; Apr-23-2021 at 12:55.

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