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Thread: Antonin Dvorak

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    Senior Member SamGuss's Avatar
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    Default Antonin Dvorak

    Antonin Dvorak (1841-1904), Czech composer of romantic classical music.

    A friend of Johannes Brahms, Dvorak gave up playing viola in an orchestra to begin composing in 1871 full time. He lived for several years in America, where he wrote one of his most popular pieces Symphony No. 9 as well as other works including his Cello Concerto. His daughter ended up marrying one of his pupils - Josef Suk.

    As an interesting piece of historical trivia, Neil Armstrong took his Symphony No. 9 on the Apollo 11 mission (the first moon landing in 1969).

    About his Concerto for Cello and Orchestra, it was well recieved and even Brahms was impressed enough to state: "Had I known that one could write a cello concerto like this, I would have written one long ago!" or "Why on earth didn't I know that one could write a cello concerto like this? If I had only known, I would have written one long ago!" (2 different sources says 2 different things - go figure!)

    It is his Symphony No. 9 that so long ago became the first piece of classical music that I liked and has stuck with me through the years. At this point I own Harnoncourt's version and intend on owning Karajan one day as well.

    Why do I like it? I can't tell you honestly... I enjoy the power of the horns and the drums together... the peace of the strings and woodwinds would be a start but not a fulfilling description. I simply enjoy it.

    Sam
    Remember the 3 SW's: Some Will, Some Won't, So What!

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    Senior Member Edward Elgar's Avatar
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    One of the greatest tunesmiths to come out of eastern europe. He is a master of both large and small scale works which shows versatility. I love the fellow!
    When all the paint has been dried, when all the stone has been carved, music shall remain, and we shall work with what remains.

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    Senior Member opus67's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SamGuss View Post
    I enjoy the power of the horns and the drums together...
    Then listen to the final movement of the 8th!

    Some of his chamber works I like are the piano quintet, Op.81, the serenade for winds, Op.44 and, of course, the string quartet No.12.
    Regards,
    Navneeth

    Want a piece of classical music identified? Post a link or upload a clip here. Someone might have an answer.


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    Senior Member Rachovsky's Avatar
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    Love the opening solo on the final movement of the 8th and I adore the "American" Quintet (String Quartet No. 12). Also all of his humoresques are nice.

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    Senior Member World Violist's Avatar
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    I like the four bagatelles he wrote (I don't know the instrumentation...). Of course, the ninth symphony is an inspiration and the twelfth quartet is amazing as well (go VIOLA SOLOS!!!).
    You get a frog in your throat, you sound hoarse.

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    Senior Member Edward Elgar's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by opus67 View Post
    Then listen to the final movement of the 8th!
    What an immense movement! I can't get enough of that exelent flute solo and powerful chromatic coda! A masterpiece!
    When all the paint has been dried, when all the stone has been carved, music shall remain, and we shall work with what remains.

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    His 8th Symphony is one of my favorite. Like 1st and 4th movement very much.
    By the way, the New World Symphony is something that I almost listen everyday... :P

    Anyone listen to his Czech Suite?? It is a rare piece and I manage to get the Polka and Finale only... both movement also nice!!

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    Senior Member ChamberNut's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by tan_pang View Post
    Anyone listen to his Czech Suite?? It is a rare piece and I manage to get the Polka and Finale only... both movement also nice!!
    I listened to it last night actually. Well, the I and II mvts anyway, at the music appreciation class I am taking. Love the Polka II. mvt. It's gorgeous!

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    Senior Member SamGuss's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by tan_pang View Post
    His 8th Symphony is one of my favorite. Like 1st and 4th movement very much.
    By the way, the New World Symphony is something that I almost listen everyday... :P

    Anyone listen to his Czech Suite?? It is a rare piece and I manage to get the Polka and Finale only... both movement also nice!!
    I listen to New World just about everyday myself. I am convinced though I now need more copies. I have Harnoncourt's version and I plan on getting Karajan's version sometime this month. Down the road I am thinking I want Neumann's and Bernstein's versions as well.

    I am definately going to seek out his Czech Suite now as well - thank you for the heads up about it!
    Remember the 3 SW's: Some Will, Some Won't, So What!

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    Assistant Administrator Chi_townPhilly's Avatar
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    Dvořák's Symphony #9 is, arguably, the most immediately "winning" of his compositions. It is, nonetheless, not alone in its ability to enchant the listener on first hearing. To whit-

    Interesting thoughts here on the Czech Suite... but to "do" the Czech Suite without doing the American Suite would be like reading Milton's Il Penseroso while overlooking L'Allegro!

    Second place in the "instant impression" category for Dvořák compositions would likely go to the Slavonic Dances- specifically the first set: Opus 46. I first discovered them on borrowed vinyl by way of "Reb"'s belovèd Szell/Cleveland Orchestra. It's almost invariably paired with the (more respected by sober critics) Opus 72. If you don't see things the way the sober critics do, you'll have an ally in me.

    Finally, Dvořák's Carnival Overture has been a friend since my teenaged years. I was making do with a stop-gap version on Naxos by Gunzenhauser and the BBC Philharmonic, but I now have the Kubelik rendition. My "age-of-vinyl" entreé was from Bernstein and the New York Philharmonic, and, as one might expect, it was a corker(!)

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    Senior Member World Violist's Avatar
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    Ah!!! The Carnival Overture is one of my favorites also, but all this talk of the 9th and Czech Suite made me forget!

    Along with other single-movement things, listen to the Romance for violin and orchestra (a really good one is Perlman/Barenboim). It's gorgeous. I immediately fell in love with it, and the beginning is so unforgettable!
    You get a frog in your throat, you sound hoarse.

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    Senior Member SamGuss's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by opus67 View Post
    Then listen to the final movement of the 8th!

    Some of his chamber works I like are the piano quintet, Op.81, the serenade for winds, Op.44 and, of course, the string quartet No.12.
    Opus, time and time again you are leading me to such great stuff! Just send me a list of your repitore and I'll just start collecting what you have Seriously though, it's been the rare piece that you've recommended that I haven't listened to for the first time and liked it when I heard it. Keep the suggestions coming in the future - please!
    Remember the 3 SW's: Some Will, Some Won't, So What!

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    Senior Member SamGuss's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chi_town/Philly View Post

    Finally, Dvořák's Carnival Overture has been a friend since my teenaged years. I was making do with a stop-gap version on Naxos by Gunzenhauser and the BBC Philharmonic, but I now have the Kubelik rendition. My "age-of-vinyl" entreé was from Bernstein and the New York Philharmonic, and, as one might expect, it was a corker(!)
    Heard this one earlier today for the first time thanks to your suggestion and it was really awesome. I've said it before, I'll say it again - so much to get, but in which order! I find that I like problems like this.
    Remember the 3 SW's: Some Will, Some Won't, So What!

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    Senior Member opus67's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SamGuss View Post
    Opus, time and time again you are leading me to such great stuff! Just send me a list of your repitore and I'll just start collecting what you have Seriously though, it's been the rare piece that you've recommended that I haven't listened to for the first time and liked it when I heard it. Keep the suggestions coming in the future - please!
    Glad to have been of help. My repertoire? It's as standard and as boring as it can get, just the usual stuff.(And I haven't even listened to them all, yet!) But if you want to listen to composers rarely heard of, you're best advised to consult TC member oisfetz.
    Regards,
    Navneeth

    Want a piece of classical music identified? Post a link or upload a clip here. Someone might have an answer.


    A quick and gentle introduction to audio formats and compression

    2009: It's the International Year of Astronomy
    http://www.astronomy2009.org/

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    When I was younger I enjoyed the 8th which at that time was called the 5th. Now I really enjoy the 7th and the Slavonic Dances more. I almost don't like the 9th anymore because I place it in the overplayed warhorse category. I played the last movement of the 9th in my highschool band. I was a trumpet player 1955-1959.

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