Likes Likes:  0
Results 1 to 7 of 7

Thread: Ein Deutsche Requiem w/o orchestra

  1. #1
    Senior Member Avey's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Cascadia
    Posts
    1,062
    Post Thanks / Like
    Blog Entries
    1

    Default Ein Deutsche Requiem w/o orchestra

    So, I'm attending a performance of Brahms's Ein Deutsche Requiem without orchestral accompaniment next weekend. From an interview on our local station with the conductor, I gleaned that this is often the less expensive route for local groups. Or that's what I assumed was going on.

    The performance, however, is accompanied by piano four hands -- a version that I was unaware of, and Brahms was the original translator (i.e. not a later version), correct? I'm quite excited. Should be a vastly different sound.

    Has anyone heard this version, preferably live? Were others aware that this version existed?

  2. #2
    Senior Member quack's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Mvmt II. Largo e Spiccato
    Posts
    1,223
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Yes Accentus choir has a very beautiful recording of the so called "London Version". The Sixteen has also a recording which I haven't heard and there seems to be another on the Neos label. I always like these kinds of reduced forces versions of famous pieces. Naxos has a whole series of Brahms' four hands arrangements of his own works including a piano only requiem and his symphonies.
    The soft complaining flute in dying notes discovers the woes of hopeless lovers.

  3. #3
    Senior Member PetrB's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Posts
    11,622
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Then as now, it was practical and known that other performing groups with nowhere near the resources to come up with a full orchestra would want to perform such works. Such arrangements were also done, sometimes right after the full score was finished, for rehearsal purposes: weeks of rehearsal with one or two pianists vs. the same with a full orchestra is an obvious economy, and that practicality was often provided for.

    This need of practicality was even more important for the music consuming public at large: without recordings, the only way to hear something not available in concert was to play it at home, or in a local group or society.

    The 'reproducing player' in homes was, in great majority, a piano. This is why there are the Liszt four-hand reductions of the Beethoven Symphonies, and many other works arranged for one or two pianists. The dissemination of repertoire through this format was not just for its own beneficent sake, but also very much to the point of sales of copies, giving the composer a better chance at a modest and slightly more regular income.

    Brahms' Liebeslieder Waltzes were written specifically for this home music-making market; they are for Piano duet (4-hands) and a handful of singers, and Brahms wrote at least two groups of those. With pianos in so many homes, and a fair amount of proficient amateurs in the general population, there was quite a healthy market for music in these formats, transcriptions, or specifically written for that format.
    Last edited by PetrB; Feb-01-2014 at 05:37.

  4. #4
    Senior Member Novelette's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    Careening on the G Clef
    Posts
    1,925
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by PetrB View Post
    Brahms' Liebeslieder Waltzes were written specifically for this home music-making market; they are for Piano duet (4-hands) and a handful of singers, and Brahms wrote at least two groups of those. With pianos in so many homes, and a fair amount of proficient amateurs in the general population, there was quite a healthy market for music in these formats, transcriptions, or specifically written for that format.
    The Liebeslieder Waltzes are better than the Neue Liebeslieder Waltzes, Op. 65a, I dare be known to think.

  5. #5
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    Seattle
    Posts
    1,570
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    I have attended a performance of the piece with piano accompaniment. At this time I do not recall if it was two- or four-handed. It was still lovely and moving.

    It was performed by the choir of a large church as a memorial. If they had had to hire an orchestra (and rent a space) to perform the piece it would not have happened.

    All other things being equal I would of course choose the orchestral version but as is often the case, that was not the choice here.

  6. #6
    Senior Member hreichgott's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    western Massachusetts, US
    Posts
    1,001
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Found out about this arrangement just last spring when I was asked if I was available to play it. I didn't know the part and was already booked that day and don't have a regular piano duo partner, so needless to say it didn't happen. Would love to do it sometime though. It's such a beautiful and meaningful piece.
    Heather W. Reichgott, piano
    http://heatherwreichgott.blogspot.com

  7. #7
    Senior Member Sonata's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    4,943
    Post Thanks / Like
    Blog Entries
    4

    Default

    i've not seen it live (I wish!) but I own both the orchestral and piano versions of the Requiem. It's beautiful.

Similar Threads

  1. Boulez Complete Works on Deutsche Grammophon
    By Garlic in forum Recorded Music and Publications
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: Aug-03-2013, 16:41
  2. Chick Corea joins Deutsche Grammophon
    By DavidMahler in forum Classical Music Discussion
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: Feb-18-2012, 23:55
  3. Deutsche Harmonia Mundi Set
    By jhar26 in forum Recorded Music and Publications
    Replies: 57
    Last Post: Aug-09-2009, 19:30
  4. Der deutsche Thread
    By Harvey in forum Community Forum
    Replies: 11
    Last Post: Nov-16-2004, 00:17

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •