Page 3 of 15 FirstFirst 123456713 ... LastLast
Results 31 to 45 of 214

Thread: Favorite St. Matthew's Passion

  1. #31
    Senior Member Itullian's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    California
    Posts
    10,035
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Marschallin Blair View Post
    Try on this Karajan couture, look in the mirror, and tell me how radiant you look with it on:

    Attachment 34361
    I have that and like it a lot. Wish they'd remaster it.
    When all else fails, listen to Thick as a Brick.

  2. Likes Marschallin Blair liked this post
  3. #32
    Senior Member Oreb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    Brisbane, Australia
    Posts
    240
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Marschallin Blair View Post
    Try on this Karajan couture, look in the mirror, and tell me how radiant you look with it on:

    Attachment 34361
    I'll get to it, but it's going to have to wait its turn. Next up for me is Richter mark 1.

  4. Likes realdealblues liked this post
  5. #33
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Posts
    2,989
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    I like some of Karajan's recordings. I like his 60's Beethoven symphony cycle, his recording of the Mozart horn concertos with Dennis Brain, his Dvorak cello concerto with Rostropovich. But I have not always been enamored by his recordings of religious choral works. There was a recording of his of the Mozart Requiem that kind of turned me off the work for a while.

  6. #34
    Senior Member EDaddy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Posts
    949
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Amazing how different recordings speak to different ears. Is it not? I find myself being drawn to starting with the Klemperer for first listen and then going from there. Sometimes experiencing a rich piece of music at a more relaxed tempo for initial listening seems to work for me. Perhaps it's because it doesn't fly by so fast... easier to take in.

    It's been fun sitting back and reading everyone's passions about The Passion! Thx all!

  7. Likes Ingélou, JosefinaHW liked this post
  8. #35
    Senior Member DavidA's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Posts
    12,967
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Woken up early so am listening to Jacobs.

  9. Likes Ingélou, JosefinaHW liked this post
  10. #36
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Christchurch, New Zealand
    Posts
    7,504
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    I stated on another thread recently that my personal faves for SMP are Richter's first and Herreweghe's second, concurring, I'm happy to note, with a number of posts here. But the talk of Klemperer reminded me that its been many years since I've heard it.

    So: for the last 3 hours and 44 minutes I've played all nine sides, and its been wonderful hearing it again. And while the chorales, including the opening one, are quite remarkably slower than usual, the set as a whole never felt slow to me - I'd instead use the word that EDaddy chose: relaxed - I was quite happy to load up the next side when each one finished. In fact I was half expecting when half way through and I looked up comparative running times on the Bach-Cantatas site to find this was standard length, or maybe just a wee bit over.

    Still not my favorite and perhaps not for everyday use but a timeless document with a dream team of soloists.

    I think the closing comments in the Third Ear Guide put it best: "Klemperer distilled the essence of the "romantic" approach at its best into a performance that neutralizes any musicological reservations and invites the listener to share in its eternal vision. No Bach collector, from arch-reactionary to unforgiving purists should overlook it."

    Last edited by SimonNZ; Feb-06-2014 at 09:36.

  11. Likes Oreb, Ingélou, JosefinaHW liked this post
  12. #37
    Senior Member (Ret) moody's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    uk
    Posts
    4,666
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by DavidA View Post
    Mind you, Moody, if you only listen to Erb, how do you know how good (or otherwise) other evangelists are? I have never heard anyone else mention Erb but that maybe that is because the recording now is hors concours. That's not to say he wasn't good, btw. But I do note he first sang the role in 1915. There have been many great singers of the role since then.

    I don't much like Bach so T don't listen to other versions. But my point is that every write -up on Erb mentions his pre-eminence in this role ad nauseum.
    When you listen to a 1904 record of say Caruso you don't mention the orchestra because you are only interested in the voice.
    You will notice that I said that whichever version the OP bought he should also get hold of the Erb---that's all so let's drop it now.
    Fools talk because they have to say something, wise men talk because they have something to say.

  13. Likes Ingélou liked this post
  14. #38
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Posts
    5,616
    Post Thanks / Like
    Blog Entries
    2

    Default

    The best modern evangelist I've heard is Rufus Müller. There's a production of the passion which Jonathan Miller did for the BBC on youtube which is well worth hearing.

    Re Erb, his voice is characterful, and I can imagine some people are repelled, just as some people are repelled by Pears and Vickers. Mengelberg is also very prayerful, and that may not suit everyone. This is, after all, an opera.
    Last edited by Mandryka; Feb-06-2014 at 17:00.

  15. #39
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Posts
    2,989
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    I am listening to the Mengelberg on YouTube. I am enjoying it. Will it replace my other favorites? I don't know. But I still enjoy listening to other versions of some of my favorite works.

  16. Likes Il_Penseroso liked this post
  17. #40
    Senior Member Bas's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    The Netherlands
    Posts
    939
    Post Thanks / Like
    Blog Entries
    4

    Default

    I want my Bach in small ensembles, more authentic to the baroque performance tradition. I have two favourites, one is favourite as the best recording (overall: sound, orchestra, singers, ensemble, tempi), that one is the one by John Butt and his Dunedin Consort:

    DunedinMatthewPassion.jpg

    And I am also very fond Herreweghe's 1998 recording, especially for the soloists (Andreas Scholl!)

    herreweghe1998mhp.png
    Dis votisque reliqui
    - Ovid

  18. Likes DaDirkNL, D Smith, Musicophile and 2 others liked this post
  19. #41
    Senior Member gardibolt's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2015
    Posts
    1,387
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Listened to the Gardiner, Suzuki, Cleobury and Karajan versions (plus one other that's slipping my mind) of the Matthew Passion last weekend in conjunction with Gardiner's book. I am finding myself obsessed with the excruciatingly discordant B-natural that Bach slips into the closing cadence of the final chorus--it's still running through my head. It's so odd and out of place to the point it's almost otherworldly. It's a fascinating choice that Gardiner touches on briefly (mostly just to point it out). Give it a listen and see if it affects you. Any thoughts on what significance this may have?

    All four of these versions have their merits: Gardiner is probably most expressive; Suzuki feels the most authentic but is a little on the sterile side; Cleobury has some interesting vocal choices, and Karajan has the old-style big band sound that's not exactly Bach but certainly is effective.
    Hours of unrecorded, unpublished and unknown Beethoven works at The Unheard Beethoven

  20. Likes JosefinaHW liked this post
  21. #42
    Senior Member Woodduck's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Posts
    13,878
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by gardibolt View Post
    Listened to the Gardiner, Suzuki, Cleobury and Karajan versions (plus one other that's slipping my mind) of the Matthew Passion last weekend in conjunction with Gardiner's book. I am finding myself obsessed with the excruciatingly discordant B-natural that Bach slips into the closing cadence of the final chorus--it's still running through my head. It's so odd and out of place to the point it's almost otherworldly. It's a fascinating choice that Gardiner touches on briefly (mostly just to point it out). Give it a listen and see if it affects you. Any thoughts on what significance this may have?
    The appoggiatura ("leaning" note) a step or half step below the main note it precedes is a common ornament in Baroque and later music, though less common than the appoggiatura from above. The appoggiatura from below is effective at suggesting grave pathos, and conveys a strong sense of inevitability (it must resolve) when it occurs on the leading tone at a cadence, as it does in this final chorus. You'll hear appoggiaturas from both directions throughout the piece, including at cadences before the final one, and the use of it at the end sums up for me the pain and pathos of the passion.

  22. Likes JosefinaHW liked this post
  23. #43
    Senior Member gardibolt's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2015
    Posts
    1,387
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Yes, but for some reason none of them as so profoundly affecting to me as this one for some reason.
    Hours of unrecorded, unpublished and unknown Beethoven works at The Unheard Beethoven

  24. #44
    Senior Member Xaltotun's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Helsinki, Finland
    Posts
    1,713
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    I go with Klemperer but since I like Richter a lot, I'll have to check out his version as well.
    Wäre das Faktum wahr, – wäre der außerordentliche Fall wirklich eingetreten, daß die politische Gesetzgebung der Vernunft übertragen, der Mensch als Selbstzweck respektiert und behandelt, das Gesetz auf den Thron erhoben, und wahre Freiheit zur Grundlage des Staatsgebäudes gemacht worden, so wollte ich auf ewig von den Musen Abschied nehmen, und dem herrlichsten aller Kunstwerke, der Monarchie der Vernunft, alle meine Thätigkeit widmen.

  25. #45
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Posts
    39,996
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    For the "old school " Richter, bit I do like Schreier (as conductor) and Karajan also
    First they ignore you, then they laugh at you, then they fight you, then you win.
    "Mahatma Gandhi"

Page 3 of 15 FirstFirst 123456713 ... LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. St Matthew Passion
    By sospiro in forum Vocal Music
    Replies: 48
    Last Post: Jan-26-2015, 20:36
  2. Did Mozart lack the passion of his contemporaries?
    By Morganist in forum Classical Music Discussion
    Replies: 16
    Last Post: Jul-21-2012, 00:09
  3. Albrechtsberger's passion
    By Ukko in forum Recorded Music and Publications
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: Jun-28-2011, 16:17
  4. My passion, hope and dream...
    By the_emptier in forum Community Forum
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: Feb-21-2011, 21:21
  5. The Little Match Girl Passion
    By kg4fxg in forum Classical Music Discussion
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: Sep-15-2009, 00:20

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •