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Thread: Favorite Dies irae

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    Senior Member adriesba's Avatar
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    Default Favorite Dies irae

    A whole lot of composers have composed Requiems. Thus, many have composed a Dies irae. Which ones are your favorites?

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    Senior Member Allegro Con Brio's Avatar
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    I like to listen to the Mozart and Verdi Diēs Īraes while I do jumping jacks before a workout. Nothing better to pump up the blood! 3rd place goes to Berlioz if you accept Tuba Mirums - crank up the Bernstein recording which features the full instrumentation Berlioz called for (four antiphonal brass choirs, several bass drums and gongs) through a good hi-fi system and it feels like Judgment Day is descending upon your neighborhood. That said, I tend to prefer the Requiems that use the Pie Jesū.

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    Senior Member Rogerx's Avatar
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    “Never argue with an idiot. They will drag you down to their level and beat you with experience.” ― Mark Twain

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    Senior Member Enthusiast's Avatar
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    I guess it depends on what sort of torments you prefer your recently departed loved ones to be put through.

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    Senior Member Bwv 1080's Avatar
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    Totentanz and Stravinsky's Octet

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    Senior Member mikeh375's Avatar
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    It has to be the Britten War Requiem for me...kicks Verdi's *** to my ears....
    Last edited by mikeh375; Mar-04-2020 at 16:05.

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    Senior Member hammeredklavier's Avatar
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    I think many people on this forum tend to overlook Johann Christian Bach, in favor of his older brother Carl Phillip Emmanuel, but Christian also wrote decent music. I find the use of austere-sounding polyphony in this piece skillful. Especially towards the ending, 34:27

    [ 34:27 ]

    34m27s


    This is also good:
    Last edited by hammeredklavier; Mar-07-2020 at 12:36.

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    Senior Member Rogerx's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Enthusiast View Post
    I guess it depends on what sort of torments you prefer your recently departed loved ones to be put through.
    Unless the dearly departed asked playing this on his / her. funeral/ cremation .
    “Never argue with an idiot. They will drag you down to their level and beat you with experience.” ― Mark Twain

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    Verdi takes a pretty decent stab at it, but I'm not convinced that anyone tops Mozart in the Dies Irae department. Not that I'm especially pro-Mozart, but fair's fair. Has to be done with proper ferocity though. One of my favourite recordings of this is Marriner's first (1977), where he really lets his hair down for once.

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    Senior Member Allegro Con Brio's Avatar
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    Verdi and Mozart's visions of Judgment Day only have the proper effect on me when performed by Toscanini and Bernstein, respectively.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Allegro Con Brio View Post
    Verdi and Mozart's visions of Judgment Day only have the proper effect on me when performed by Toscanini and Bernstein, respectively.
    Well, if you have heard them all....

    Anyway, I did hear Solti and was impressed on that part. I have Marriner/Karajan and some others and Verdi is Ok for me but maybe I need to listen again--Gardiner/Shaw.

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    Junior Member DaddyGeorge's Avatar
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    Best for me is Mozart, but I also like this https://youtu.be/xh-IqeuqBWs

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    Senior Member KenOC's Avatar
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    Britten for me too, although the torments are right here at home and not in the afterlife.


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    Nobody out-weirds Berlioz, I think he goes beyond the conventionally dramatic (as much as I love Mozart and Verdi) to the really unsettling and awe-some.

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    I don't know what a Dies irae is. I read two detailed books on the life of Rachmaninoff and my recollection is he used Dies irae a lot, but I am still mystified as to what this Dies irae, other than I think it is some dark and foreboding thing.
    "Life is too short to spend it wandering in the barren Sahara of musical trash."
    --Sergei Vasilyevich Rachmaninoff

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