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Thread: Best Film Uses of Non-Film Music

  1. #16
    Senior Member FLighT's Avatar
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    "Duet" by Philip Glass in "Stoker". The score for the film was by Clint Mansell so I don't believe Glass was asked to compose it for the movie. I felt it was very effective on several levels in the scene it was used in. The Duet is played by the 2 principal characters. As the music twists about itself so do the characters, both physically and emotionally, the sexual tension is not subtle, and at the same time the piece creates an unsettling, psychologically perverted feeling that suits the overall mood and storyline.
    Last edited by FLighT; Jul-05-2014 at 23:43.
    Karlheinz Klopweisser:
    "German silence, which is of course organic, as opposed to French silence, which is ornamental..."

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    Senior Member FLighT's Avatar
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    Brahms: "Intermezzo in A major" featured prominently in 2 (at least) of the 8 "Jesse Stone" made for TV movies based on the books of Robert B. Parker. Tom Selleck plays a divorced, alcoholic, ex LAPD detective who relocates to a small New England town to become police chief. The movie score itself for the series is by Jeff Beal and I like it very much as well. It's haunting and yet in some fashion consoling at the same time. Selleck is perfect, I can't imagine any other actor doing the character justice and I think it's his greatest portrayal. Sadly, Parker died in 2010, there is a ninth and final Stone novel that has not been made into a movie as yet. Hopefully it will get made and have the series end in the only way possible for this melancholy, self-destructive character that somehow evokes my sense of compassion, as I've known the type.
    Last edited by FLighT; Jul-06-2014 at 00:16.
    Karlheinz Klopweisser:
    "German silence, which is of course organic, as opposed to French silence, which is ornamental..."

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    Senior Member sdtom's Avatar
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    Grieg's was also used in Woody Allen's "Scoop"

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    Senior Member sdtom's Avatar
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    One I'm surprised that has not been mentioned is the Gounod theme which was his theme song for Alfred Hitchcock Presents
    Tom

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    Senior Member FLighT's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by FLighT View Post
    "Duet" by Philip Glass in "Stoker". The score for the film was by Clint Mansell so I don't believe Glass was asked to compose it for the movie. I felt it was very effective on several levels in the scene it was used in. The Duet is played by the 2 principal characters. As the music twists about itself so do the characters, both physically and emotionally, the sexual tension is not subtle, and at the same time the piece creates an unsettling, psychologically perverted feeling that suits the overall mood and storyline.
    I have to correct myself. It turns out the director of "Stoker", Park Chan-Wook, actually did ask Glass to compose the "Duet" just for this 3 minute scene. Probably why it works so well. So this piece does not qualify under the topic.
    Karlheinz Klopweisser:
    "German silence, which is of course organic, as opposed to French silence, which is ornamental..."

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    Senior Member Fugue Meister's Avatar
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    I'm amazed no one has mentioned the use of Wagner's "Ride of the Valkyries" in "Apocalypse Now". While we're on Coppola, he used Brahms' Symphony No. 1 in c to great effect in "Tetro".

    No one beat's Kubrick though.. My favorite use of music in a film is the adagio from the "Gayane" ballet suite during the jupiter mission segment of "2001: A space odyssey". Man that Kubrick was something else... I also give him credit for getting me into Shostakovich (Jazz suite waltz in "Eyes Wide Shut").

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    Quote Originally Posted by sdtom View Post
    Grieg's was also used in Woody Allen's "Scoop"
    Speaking of Woody Allen:

    Rhapsody In Blue over the opening montage of Manhattan:


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    Senior Member nightscape's Avatar
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    "In Your Eyes" in Say Anything...

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    Stanley Kubrick was a master at this,I would choose his films between 2001 and Eyes Wide Shut(excluding Full Metal Jacket).
    It is too difficult to post links to youtube from my playstation so look up Stanley Kubrick - Music,very interesting.

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    Or how about the mear mention of music? Woody Allen says the 2nd movement the Jupiter symphony is one the reasons life is worth living in Manhattan.

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    Or how about the mear mention of music? Woody Allen says the 2nd movement the Jupiter symphony is one the reasons life is worth living in Manhattan.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Sol Invictus View Post
    Or how about the mear mention of music? Woody Allen says the 2nd movement the Jupiter symphony is one the reasons life is worth living in Manhattan.
    Do not believe everything Woody says......
    First they ignore you, then they laugh at you, then they fight you, then you win.
    "Mahatma Gandhi"

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    Senior Member tdc's Avatar
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    I think Kubrick relied too much on classical music in his movies. I think it is better to find a good film composer to tailor music for specific scenes (even when he did this I'm not crazy about the results though like that piano stuff in Eyes Wide Shut - boring!). There are exceptions of course and certain instances where a piece of classical music works perfectly in a scene, but Kubrick (in my view) tended to rely too much on slapping classical music over his scenes, most of which I think would sound better with different music. In Space Odyssey the Ligeti pieces he used work great I don't think any of the other classical music works very well in it. The majority of the time the music he chooses doesn't seem quite right to me.

    I do think he was genius in certain other areas though and all of his films have redeeming qualities, but over all he is a director that I respect but have mixed feelings about.

    In response to the OP I do like David Lynch's use of Barber's Adagio for Strings in The Elephant Man.

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    Quote Originally Posted by tdc View Post
    I think Kubrick relied too much on classical music in his movies. I think it is better to find a good film composer to tailor music for specific scenes (even when he did this I'm not crazy about the results though like that piano stuff in Eyes Wide Shut - boring!). There are exceptions of course and certain instances where a piece of classical music works perfectly in a scene, but Kubrick (in my view) tended to rely too much on slapping classical music over his scenes, most of which I think would sound better with different music. In Space Odyssey the Ligeti pieces he used work great I don't think any of the other classical music works very well in it. The majority of the time the music he chooses doesn't seem quite right to me.

    I do think he was genius in certain other areas though and all of his films have redeeming qualities, but over all he is a director that I respect but have mixed feelings about.

    In response to the OP I do like David Lynch's use of Barber's Adagio for Strings in The Elephant Man.
    As much I adore Kubrick, I'm going to have to agree 100%. With the exception of A Clockwork Orange, most my favorite moments in his films are either silent or only dialogue. You can tell he always thought of cinema as a visual medium above all else given the tremendous amount of time spent on set design, costume design, location scouting, and certainly not least of which the amount of takes he shot.
    Last edited by Sol Invictus; Dec-22-2016 at 18:20. Reason: grammatical error

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    In the Shawshank Redemption, there's a very moving scene in which the prisoners listen to a duet from Mozart's Marriage of Figaro. The scene demonstrates the uplifting and inspiring power of Mozart's music. For those brief moments, the prisoners feel able to transcend their bleak environment.

    I'm not sure how realistic the scene is. Would a group of hardened criminals really be so moved by Mozart's music? Perhaps not. But whether or not the scene is true to life, it makes a compelling statement about the emotional effects of music.

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