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Thread: I need a finale for my recital

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    Senior Member Brad's Avatar
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    Default I need a finale for my recital

    Im planning on having a recital sometime this summer and I need one more piece to complete it. Based on the skill level of these pieces, what do you think would be a nice way to wrap it all up? I'm looking for something that ends loudly and grandly. Also, they will not necessarily be performed in this order:

    1. Bach Partita no. 1 in Bb major
    2. Chopin Etude op. 10 no. 3 in E major
    3. Beethoven-Liszt An die Ferne Geliebte (song cycle transcription)
    4. Mozart Sonata no. 11 "Turkish March"
    5. Grieg "Wedding day at Troldhaugen" lyric piece
    6. ?

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    Senior Member ptr's Avatar
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    If You can play the first Partita You can play anything!

    And thusly, why not play something that show some more breadth of Repertoire knowledge... Perhaps:

    Igor Stravinsky's Four Etudes Op 7 (1908) About 8 mins

    Claude Debussy's Pour le Piano L95 (1901) About 12½ mins

    Béla Bartók's Six Romanian Folk Dances Sz 56/BB68 (1915) About 5 mins

    /ptr
    Je suis Charlie ~ I am a certified OrgaNut! (F.—I.W.)

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    Senior Member PetrB's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ptr View Post
    If You can play the first Partita You can play anything!
    /ptr
    Well, I'm pretty sure that is not really the case :-)

    But, I'm thinking since there is already one solo movement from a sonata on this recital (eyebrow raising in many contexts, not if done as one of a number of short encores:-), that what is called for here is a briefer single-movement piece, and I think Debussy's Jardins sous la pluie from his Estampes might fit the bill. (The three pieces of Estampes are quite acceptably performed individually.)

    It is not easy, nor is it greatly difficult (I still think it will be a bit of a challenge for you), and it is one of those pieces which makes an impression greater than its technical difficulty.

    ...this link shows the score, and Maestro Gieseking takes it at a very musically judicious amd good (not-too hurried) tempo. At a little over three minutes, maybe just the thing :-)
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w-1ERRRUM-c
    Last edited by PetrB; Mar-27-2014 at 10:42.

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    Schubert/Liszt - Erlkonig ?
    Last edited by Matsps; Mar-27-2014 at 10:44.

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    Senior Member Ravndal's Avatar
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    This

    "That as s."

    - Mark Twain

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    Senior Member PetrB's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Matsps View Post
    Schubert/Liszt - Erlkonig ?
    Don't overreach your technical limit, or our time limit to get the 'new' final piece in good working order.

    The Chopin Etudes Op. 10 No. 3 & No. 4 were written to go together as a pair, but I think Op. 10 no. 4 might be outside your present technical reach and time limit. If you could, then the two, as a pair, at the end of the program would work well to close it.

    You can go wrong with an Etude as a finale, and I think an isolated Chopin Etude in that slot a bad choice, whichever of them you would choose. (Traditionally, too, if you are doing, say, a senior music school recital, you would group the three or four Chopin Etudes you do have together somewhere on the program.)

    Keep the Op. 10 no. 3, (you already have it), it is certainly a known and beloved crowd-pleaser, but it is not any sort of 'finale' piece, since it begins and ends as quietly as many of the nocturnes.

    The Debussy, or something much more like, is that perfect brilliant and 'up-beat' piece, and that sort of brilliant sound and display, with which to end such a recital made up of the pieces you have listed.

    You already have enough to contemplate as to running order, which goes not only by mood, but if at all possible, but some key relationships from one to the next where the listener does not feel a half-step 'bump' when you have ended one and begin the next.
    Last edited by PetrB; Mar-27-2014 at 10:59.

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    Senior Member Ravndal's Avatar
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    "That as s."

    - Mark Twain

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    Senior Member PetrB's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ravndal View Post
    Unless the OP has changed their mind, the request was for a finale with panache :-)

    I liked your suggestion of the Poulenc Toccata!
    Last edited by PetrB; Mar-27-2014 at 11:58.

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    Senior Member PetrB's Avatar
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    1. BAROQUE ~ Bach Partita no. 1 in Bb major
    2. ROMANTIC ~ Chopin Etude op. 10 no. 3 in E major
    3. CLASSICAL / ROMANTIC ~ Beethoven-Liszt An die Ferne Geliebte (song cycle transcription)
    4. CLASSICAL ~ Mozart Sonata no. 11 "Turkish March"
    5. ROMANTIC ~ Grieg "Wedding day at Troldhaugen" lyric piece
    6. MODERN & or CONTEMPORARY -- you need that! :-)

    The recommended Debussy Jardins sous la pluie, the Poulenc Toccata, fit the finale quality and the modern categories. Be Not Afraid! They're both audience friendly and quite a pleasure to play, guaranteed

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    Senior Member omega's Avatar
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    Debussy's La Cathédrale engloutie (from the 1st book of the Préludes). It's quite slow, but has some very beautiful and solemn parts.
    (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vnt8u1XnJU4)
    Debussy's Little Negro perhaps doesn't fit with your programme, but it could be great as an 'encore'.
    (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BYGMHZeIoxw)
    Maybe a sonata by Scriabin would be an original finale. I'm not a pianist so I can't judge what the skill level exactly is. I was thinking of the fourth :
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lQabCdxJ6DM

    Or, why not, some more jazzy piece?

    Good luck, anyway


    Fluctuat nec mergitur

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    Yeah when I suggested the Liszt transcription, I saw you have until the summer to get it ready. I'm not sure exactly how good you are on the piano though. If it's too hard, I would definitely agree with PetrB, choose something else. If you could definitely manage it though, I think it would make a wonderful finale piece. I definitely disagree that a recital should aim to cover all major periods of music though. I would not say you need something contemporary in that final slot. I also personally think the Debussy is a bit of a weak recital end.

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    Senior Member Sofronitsky's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Brad View Post
    Im planning on having a recital sometime this summer and I need one more piece to complete it. Based on the skill level of these pieces, what do you think would be a nice way to wrap it all up? I'm looking for something that ends loudly and grandly. Also, they will not necessarily be performed in this order:

    1. Bach Partita no. 1 in Bb major
    2. Chopin Etude op. 10 no. 3 in E major
    3. Beethoven-Liszt An die Ferne Geliebte (song cycle transcription)
    4. Mozart Sonata no. 11 "Turkish March"
    5. Grieg "Wedding day at Troldhaugen" lyric piece
    6. ?
    With the exception of the ENTIRE Bach Partita No. 1, most of these pieces are quite easy from a conservatory/professional pianist stand point.

    Quickly I would like to address the most popular two suggestions so far:

    1) Debussy Estampes, #3 - This is a fine piece and learnable by you, but I feel it isn't really a 'showstopper'. It has a strong ending, and if performed well, could end a recital well - but I think you want something a little bit more obvious. You want something that really says "Its over, you can clap now". I don't think this Debussy is that kind of piece.

    2) Poulenc Toccata - This piece is not too difficult for you, but I would not recommend it. It is by far harder than the other pieces you are playing and would take more time than a few months to really do justice to (depending on skill level, I know some pianists who would take a year in learning it and some that would be able to perform it after four weeks of study)

    My recommendation would be this -

    If you are playing all movements of the Mozart and Bach, I am guessing your technique is rather refined and you learn things quickly. In that case I would suggest one of the following two pieces:

    Scriabin: Etude op. 8 no. 12 - This piece sounds more difficult than it is. If performed correctly, this piece will really end the concert well for you. I would suggest playing it at sight at a VERY slow tempo, so slow that you are guaranteed to get every note and articulation completely correctly, and play it over and over again until you're comfortable with it - then begin working problem sections.



    you could also play a very well established piece, Rachmaninoff's Prelude op. 3 no. 2 in C-Sharp Minor

    This is a very easy piece, but it has a huge effect when played properly. I think this might be your best bet if time is a problem for you.



    It would be helpful if you could tell us how old you are, how long you've been studying, etc. so we would have more information than just 'judging by the difficulty of these pieces' but do not divulge any information you are not comfortable sharing.

    Good luck in your recital! I hope it goes well.
    Last edited by Sofronitsky; Mar-28-2014 at 09:11.

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    Senior Member hreichgott's Avatar
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    Troldhaugen isn't loud and grand enough for you??
    Heather W. Reichgott, piano
    http://heatherwreichgott.blogspot.com

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    Senior Member PetrB's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by hreichgott View Post
    Troldhaugen isn't loud and grand enough for you??
    Maybe we're all barking up the wrong tree --
    and this pianist actually instead wants something more like the Sousa / Horowitz Stars and Stripes Variations???

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    Senior Member Brad's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sofronitsky View Post
    With the exception of the ENTIRE Bach Partita No. 1, most of these pieces are quite easy from a conservatory/professional pianist stand point.

    Quickly I would like to address the most popular two suggestions so far:

    1) Debussy Estampes, #3 - This is a fine piece and learnable by you, but I feel it isn't really a 'showstopper'. It has a strong ending, and if performed well, could end a recital well - but I think you want something a little bit more obvious. You want something that really says "Its over, you can clap now". I don't think this Debussy is that kind of piece.

    2) Poulenc Toccata - This piece is not too difficult for you, but I would not recommend it. It is by far harder than the other pieces you are playing and would take more time than a few months to really do justice to (depending on skill level, I know some pianists who would take a year in learning it and some that would be able to perform it after four weeks of study)

    My recommendation would be this -

    If you are playing all movements of the Mozart and Bach, I am guessing your technique is rather refined and you learn things quickly. In that case I would suggest one of the following two pieces:

    Scriabin: Etude op. 8 no. 12 - This piece sounds more difficult than it is. If performed correctly, this piece will really end the concert well for you. I would suggest playing it at sight at a VERY slow tempo, so slow that you are guaranteed to get every note and articulation completely correctly, and play it over and over again until you're comfortable with it - then begin working problem sections.



    you could also play a very well established piece, Rachmaninoff's Prelude op. 3 no. 2 in C-Sharp Minor

    This is a very easy piece, but it has a huge effect when played properly. I think this might be your best bet if time is a problem for you.



    It would be helpful if you could tell us how old you are, how long you've been studying, etc. so we would have more information than just 'judging by the difficulty of these pieces' but do not divulge any information you are not comfortable sharing.

    Good luck in your recital! I hope it goes well.
    First of all thank you guys so much for all of this feedback and advice! Sorry for the late reply, but I will tell you a bit more about myself and hopefully then we can narrow down these selections.

    I took lessons when I was younger, but quit just like most kids out of lack of interest. About 3-4 years ago I started playing my piano again (which got me into classical music, which has dominated my life since then). Apart from taking AP Music Theory a couple years ago as a freshman in high school (I'm 17 and a junior now), I had not received any 'formal' training in music/piano until last Fall when I began 'serious' lessons and we started thinking about this recital. I have recently completed the Chopin etude and would say that it, along with the Bach Partita, is a good measure of my ability at the moment. I plan to have this recital sometime in the summer, but there is no date yet. Also, I tend to learn music relatively quickly, so if a piece is within my skill range, I am confident that I can play it with good understanding by the summer.

    I hope this serves as a better gauge for your recommendations, and once again thank you so much!

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