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Thread: Ten favorite film scores

  1. #46
    Senior Member Prodromides's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dave Whitmore View Post
    But here's my list.

    Lord of the Rings
    2001 A Space Odyssey
    Hi, Dave W.

    Leonard Rosenman wrote the score for LORD OF THE RINGS in 1978; Howard Shore did the trilogy in the early 2000s (and these are, presumably, residents within your Top 10).

    Also, Kubrick's 2001 had an unused score by Alex North (but I don't think you are referring to North's music).
    Last edited by Prodromides; Oct-04-2014 at 20:17.

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  3. #47
    Senior Member MagneticGhost's Avatar
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    English Patient - Gabriel Yared
    Betty Blue - Gabriel Yared
    Jurassic Park - John Williams
    Schindler's List - John Williams
    The Unforgettable Year - Dmitri Shostakovich
    Three Colours Blue - Preisner

    There's a lot of good Preisner scores out there actually.
    Add my love to Gone with the Wind, Back to the Future, James Bond and of course LOTR.
    “Let us be grateful to the people who make us happy; they are the charming gardeners who make our souls blossom.”

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  5. #48
    Senior Member Dave Whitmore's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Prodromides View Post
    Hi, Dave W.

    Leonard Rosenman wrote the score for LORD OF THE RINGS in 1978; Howard Shore did the trilogy in the early 2000s (and these are, presumably, residents within your Top 10).

    Also, Kubrick's 2001 had an unused score by Alex North (but I don't think you are referring to North's music).

    When I think 2001 I think this:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Szdziw4tI9o

  6. #49
    Senior Member omega's Avatar
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    I'm not a specialist when it comes to cinema. Let me pick some random music scores I like (many Hitchcock here, too):

    Vertigo
    Psycho
    North by Northwest
    Le Professionnel
    Le Pacha
    The Godfather
    Atlantis
    Chariots of Fire (have a look at this particular version!)
    And some James Bond themes, too


    Fluctuat nec mergitur

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  8. #50
    Senior Member Crudblud's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dave Whitmore View Post
    When I think 2001 I think this:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Szdziw4tI9o
    The difference being it wasn't written specifically for the film, making it a soundtrack. A score is an original piece of music written for a film, not simply any music that is used in that film. I'm sure for most people it's a minor technicality, but I stick to it.
    Last edited by Crudblud; Oct-04-2014 at 22:30.

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  10. #51
    Senior Member Blancrocher's Avatar
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    1. Jules & Jim - Georges Delerue
    2. Amarcord - Nino Rota
    3. The Double Life of Veronique - Zbigniew Preisner
    4. Dracula - Philip Glass
    5. Once Upon a Time in the West - Ennio Morricone
    6. Breathless - Martial Sodal
    7. Elevator to the Gallows - Miles Davis
    8. Vertigo - Bernard Hermann
    9. Blade Runner - Vangelis
    10. Ran - Toru Takemitsu

    Not really in order (except for the top spot), and in a few cases I may be remembering liking the film more than the score, which in some cases I haven't heard separately. I went for variety rather than listing a bunch of Nino Rota, who I adore. Anyways, there's 10 for now!

    *p.s.* The Glass score (one of my favorite albums by the composer) is an interesting case in that it's for an old film. I'm curious to know of more instances of this kind of project.

    I'm interested in seeing the film with the soundtrack--yet another thing to do!
    Last edited by Blancrocher; Oct-05-2014 at 09:33.

  11. #52
    Senior Member Pip's Avatar
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    I look on the greatest of film scores as being so important that the movie itself would be diminished without it.

    Everything by Korngold was a classic score even if some of the movies (Juarez, Another Dawn, Devotion) were poor.
    However where the movie content was high class then they entered another category - EG
    Adventures of Robin Hood
    The Sea Hawk
    The Prince and the Pauper
    Elizabeth and Essex
    Between Two Worlds

    Add Bernard Herrmann to this and we get so many more, it is impossible to list them all.
    I love the atmospheric score to "The Ghost and Mrs Muir"

    A modern classic from Morricone who composed so many great scores - "Cinema Paradiso"

    Miklos Rozsa was another of my top 4 or 5.
    A hauntingly beautiful score was to Billy Wilder's "The Private Life of Sherlock Holmes"

    Although Crudblud is correct about music not being specifically written for movies, I think that Stanley Kubrick's genius in picking the right music for his movies is second to none.
    Barry Lyndon.

    Finally, I can't finish this post without acknowledging two great British composers and their adventures with cinema

    Vaughan-Williams - Scott of the Antartic and 49th Parallel
    William Walton - Henry V and Hamlet.

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  13. #53
    Senior Member Couac Addict's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pip View Post
    I think that Stanley Kubrick's genius in picking the right music for his movies is second to none.
    Barry Lyndon.
    Agreed. I think a lot of it had to with him picking the music first then filming the scene to the music. Sergio Leone did the same to some extent. He would give Morricone some rough notes about what was happening. The music was scored and Leone would play it through speakers while the scene was being filmed.

    It works so well because the film supports the music and not the other way around.
    This space for rent.

  14. #54
    Senior Member Blancrocher's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Couac Addict View Post
    Agreed. I think a lot of it had to with him picking the music first then filming the scene to the music.
    I understand that this wasn't quite the case for 2001. In a documentary I watched I recall him being reported as saying that he'd always intended to have other music than what ended up in the film; the Strauss and so forth was just what they had on hand and used as filler while they were editing, but gradually Kubrick realized that the film music he was getting wasn't as good as the classical pieces so he just went with those.

    Mind you, this has a whiff of urban legend about it: few soundtracks sound so inevitable.

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  16. #55
    Senior Member Couac Addict's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Blancrocher View Post
    I understand that this wasn't quite the case for 2001. In a documentary I watched I recall him being reported as saying that he'd always intended to have other music than what ended up in the film; the Strauss and so forth was just what they had on hand and used as filler while they were editing, but gradually Kubrick realized that the film music he was getting wasn't as good as the classical pieces so he just went with those.

    Mind you, this has a whiff of urban legend about it: few soundtracks sound so inevitable.
    I don't know how true these things are either but I'd heard that a score had been commissioned but Strauss etc had been used as a template prior to filming.
    This space for rent.

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  18. #56
    Senior Member Prodromides's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Blancrocher View Post
    6. Breathless - Martial Sodal

    *p.s.* The Glass score (one of my favorite albums by the composer) is an interesting case in that it's for an old film. I'm curious to know of more instances of this kind of project.
    Oops - this would be Martial Solal, whose music for "A bout de souffle" along with other scores are on this French digi-pak CD:




    ... and French composers Antoine Duhamel and Pierre Jansen in collaboration wrote a music score to D.W. Griffith's "Intolerance".
    Last edited by Prodromides; Oct-05-2014 at 18:53.

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  20. #57
    Senior Member Prodromides's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pip View Post
    Miklos Rozsa was another of my top 4 or 5.
    A hauntingly beautiful score was to Billy Wilder's "The Private Life of Sherlock Holmes"
    ... which was based upon one of Rozsa's own concertos.

  21. #58
    Senior Member Marschallin Blair's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Marschallin Blair View Post
    Cheers to your dad. . .

    I certainly like the look and the sound of the '68 Mustang Fastback (especially the Shelby GT)-- but it doesn't have positraction or a 440.

    People on the set of Bullitt said that every time that '68 440 Charger R/T hit the straight-away-- it just pulled away from the Mustang. . . in force.

    McQueen originally asked if he could drive the Charger and not the Mustang for the role-- but the request was denied. The black Charger was to be the "bad guy's" car; and so it was. . .

    Admittedly, I have a thing for '68-'70 Chargers and Roadrunners; '70 and '71 Cudas too; 440 six-pack set ups and Hemi's only please. . . ;D



    This is what a race engine should sound like:



    I might have to buy this guy's '70 440 Cuda-- and paint it proper Panther Pink. . . and then roll up alongside some guy with a new Z-06 2015 Corvette. . . flip my hair. . . say, "Hi Good Lookin'". . . and then leave him about four car lengths behind me. ;D Ha. Ha. Ha. Ha.
    Last edited by Marschallin Blair; Oct-07-2014 at 07:31.

  22. #59
    Senior Member PetrB's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Blancrocher View Post
    4. Dracula - Philip Glass
    *p.s.* The Glass score (one of my favorite albums by the composer) is an interesting case in that it's for an old film. I'm curious to know of more instances of this kind of project.
    Glass also wrote an "opera" to coordinate frame for frame with Cocteau's La Belle et la Bête, and it is an odd sort of tour de force of lip-sync, using the film script's original French dialogue. :-)

    The performance is done with the film running, conductor and singers watching through their performing it in order to keep in sync, just as old film scores were recorded.

    This youtube poster has done a bang-up job of mostly keeping the score and film in sync....
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ee2NukKPqxE

    Of course, when Glass' introductory music is running under the credits, when "musique de Georges Auric" flashes by, that is no longer true.

    The film is a very famous and beloved masterpiece, with terrific acting as well as a very appropriate score by Auric. It is hard for me to take his reworking because of that, apart from the fact I'm not in any way a huge fan of near any of Glass' works.

    Disregarding for a moment Glass' musical vocabulary, the reason I think it more a fail than anything is the timing it frame to frame with the film, the singing is it all in speaking tempo, i.e. there is no room for the more expanded breathing time or longer timed breath of effective sung speech to have its day or be much expressive if at all; the 'talk tempo' of the sung speech in the piece for me reduces it to a kind of constant parody of singspiel recitative throughout.


    Best regards.
    Last edited by PetrB; Oct-07-2014 at 22:13.

  23. #60
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    Gone with the Wind - Max Steiner
    El Cid - Miklós Rózsa
    Laurence of Arabia - Maurice Jarre
    The Mission - Ennio Morricone
    Conan the Barbarian - Basil Poledouris
    Big Country - Jerome Moross
    Vertigo - Bernard Herman
    Zulu - John Barry
    Where Eagles Dare - Ron Godwin
    Le Mepris - Georges Delerue
    Last edited by Loge; Oct-30-2014 at 16:00.

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