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Thread: Enquiry to Male Voice

  1. #1
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    Default Enquiry to Male Voice

    Good evening All,

    I'm a 24 year old male who is very interested in operatic arts and how human voices work. I'm attending voice lessons soon.

    I have made two audio recordings of myself vocalizing several tones and would like to know, out of curiosity, if they are reinforced falsetto or head voice or chest/mixed voice? (Apologies for my poor voice quality)

    1.) https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?v...21361708559690


    2.) https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?v...08008140603908
    (I'm not too sure what this note. But it sounds like above Bb4)



    3.) https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?v...62807768213136

    The 3rd recording details my attempt to sing Che Faro senza. I didn't warm up so my high notes sound shaky; in fact, my G4 sounds fluttery and anything above that seems to be in a different register)



    The 4th recording details my singing 'Ah' on the scale: 1 3 5 3 1, without regards to any vocal techniques(hence I sounded off pitch ) while the 5-th recording details me vocalizing from F4 to as low as I could :

    4.) https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?v...15518020731741

    5.) https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?v...02054606550815



    Out of curiosity, based on the above recordings, am I tenor or baritone or bass-baritone?



    Thanks for your attention.


    Regards

  2. #2
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    For 2.), that is the highest note (probably a semitone higher) I can reach in that kind of vocal production.

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    It's not so easy to tell, but my first guess is that you sound like a tenor. It's not a good idea to take my word for it however, since you'd need to work very closely with a vocal profession. This person could help you find the break in your voice, which is a surefire way of telling your correct voice type.

    The fact that you seem to be able to sing high is not a guarantee that you're a tenor. Many beginners are often surprised to find out that they've been able to achieve high notes all these years by skillful tightening of the larynx. Once you learn to relax the larynx and keep it in a low position without forcing, your natural voice type will immediately begin to show itself. This can take a long time and can only be achieved with a good voice teacher however.

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    Thanks for the great advice! I have embarked on my first voice lesson some time ago and the teacher said I'm a tenor on after hearing me for two lessons. He said my voice breaks at around G4/A4.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Alfredoz View Post
    Thanks for the great advice! I have embarked on my first voice lesson some time ago and the teacher said I'm a tenor on after hearing me for two lessons. He said my voice breaks at around G4/A4.
    Okay agreed your voice has a tenor tone and falls off on the low end. I was pretty solidly a baritone and on a good day could do G4.

    For the first 2 videos: I wouldn't count on keeping your falsetto range as you get older. Someone correct me if I'm wrong here but I have lost a substantial amount of range up there.

    Fourth video: PLEASE DON'T DO THAT to your voice. As you take lessons and learn to relax and position yourself better you should be able to effectively extend that top range. You MUST allow the teacher to help you work that range so you can safely reach and hit those notes. The last thing you want to do is damage your voice...seriously.

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    Quote Originally Posted by bnolsen View Post
    Fourth video: PLEASE DON'T DO THAT to your voice. As you take lessons and learn to relax and position yourself better you should be able to effectively extend that top range. You MUST allow the teacher to help you work that range so you can safely reach and hit those notes. The last thing you want to do is damage your voice...seriously.
    So true! That was far too wide and the larynx was positioned far too high. It will take a lot of practice and patience to learn how to relax your larynx and connect with the resonant cavities in your head. High notes are a function of head resonance - not force!

    Each tone should always start and end on the "ng" in the word "sing". Your teacher can give you exercises that help you vocalize in that tiny space. With time you'll be able to produce a huge amount of volume with minimum effort, sort of like the loud speaker effect.

  7. #7
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    Thanks for great advice. In the 2nd video, I didn't seem to experience the sensation of singing in falsetto, while in the first video, I sounded like I'm using falsetto. Haha
    Last edited by Alfredoz; Apr-29-2014 at 19:14.

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