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Thread: The Jazz Hole

  1. #151
    Senior Member starthrower's Avatar
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    I think I have the "terrible sounding" original CD, which still sounds better than most Blue Note albums I've heard. I don't know if the later remastered CD sounds any better. I've re-purchased a few Columbia CDs of various types of music, but didn't notice any difference, with the exception of Weather Report's Mysterious Traveller. The first edition sounded horrible.

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  3. #152
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    Default Miles Davis: Sketches of Spain



    I am sure you all have this beauty in your possession. I never tire of it.

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    Default John Coltrane: Giant Steps


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  7. #154
    Senior Member (Ret) Alypius's Avatar
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    Lope’s citing of two essential jazz recordings sparked an idea:

    What are, for you, the essential jazz records? Best 10? 25? 50?

    My list is below. I decided to limit it to one record per artist, with just a couple of exceptions (Miles Davis, John Coltrane, Charles Mingus, Herbie Hancock). That limitation proved little short of anguishing, but it seemed to me a way to make sure that I represent a wide range of my favorite artists. With those artists whose best work occurred before the rise of the LP (e.g. Louis Armstrong, Charlie Parker), it seemed best to cite famous "greatest hits" compilations. I also deliberately stopped at the year 1980. I will post another list of essentials since 1980s at a later time.

    My list will certainly be easy to challenge -- whether my choice of artists or of albums. I hope that this listing might prove helpful to those who are getting started in jazz. And for those of you who already know jazz well, I hope it proves provocative enough that you will post rival lists of your own. I have listed them in chronological order. Here goes:

    1. Louis Armstrong, Complete Hot Fives & Hot Seven Recordings (1925-1928)
    2. Count Basie, Ken Burns Jazz: Count Basie (1932-1950s; released: 2000)
    3. Billie Holiday, Lady Day: The Best of Billie Holiday (1933-1944)
    4. Coleman Hawkins, Body and Soul (1939-1956)
    5. Dizzy Gillespie, Ken Burns Jazz: Dizzy Gillespie (1940-1967; released: 2000)
    6. Charlie Parker, The Yardbird Suite (1942-1949)
    7. Lester Young, The Complete Alladin Recordings (1945-1947)
    8. Kenny Dorham, Afro-Cuban (1955)
    9. Sonny Rollins, Saxophone Colossus (1956)
    10. Duke Ellington, Ellington at Newport 1956 (1956)
    11. Thelonious Monk, Monk’s Music (1957)
    12. Lou Donaldson, Blues Walk (1958)
    13. Sonny Clark, Cool Struttin (1958)
    14. Miles Davis, Kind of Blue (1959)
    15. Dave Brubeck, Time Out (1959)
    16. Charles Mingus, Mingus Ah Um (1959)
    17. Ornette Coleman, Shape of Jazz to Come (1959)
    18. Art Blakey, A Night in Tunisia (1960)
    19. John Coltrane, Giant Steps (1960)
    20. Bill Evans, Sunday at the Village Vanguard (1961)
    21. Wes Montgomery, The Incredible Jazz Guitar of Wes Montgomery (1961)
    22. Oliver Nelson, The Blues and the Abstract Truth (1961)
    23. Dexter Gordon, Go (1962)
    24. Charles Mingus, The Black Saint and the Sinner Lady (1963)
    25. John Coltrane, A Love Supreme (1964)
    26. Joe Henderson, In ‘N’ Out (1964)
    27. Lee Morgan, The Sidewinder (1964)
    28. Horace Silver, Song for My Father (1964)
    29. Andrew Hill, Point of Departure (1964)
    30. Eric Dolphy, Out to Lunch (1964)
    31. Wayne Shorter, Speak No Evil (1964)
    32. Stan Getz, Getz / Gilberto (1964)
    33. Herbie Hancock, Maiden Voyage (1965)
    34. Larry Young, Unity (1965)
    35. Grant Green, Idle Moments (1965)
    36. Cannonball Adderley, Mercy, Mercy, Mercy (1966)
    37. McCoy Tyner, The Real McCoy (1967)
    38. Kenny Burrell, Midnight Blue (1967)
    39. Bobby Hutcherson, Medina / Spiral (1969)
    40. Miles Davis, Bitches Brew (1970)
    41. Freddie Hubbard, Red Clay (1970)
    42. Herbie Hancock, Head Hunters (1973)
    43. Mahavishnu Orchestra, Birds of Fire (1973)
    44. Weather Report, Mysterious Traveller (1974)
    45. Keith Jarrett, Köln Concert (1975)
    46. John Abercrombie, Timeless (1975)
    47. Jaco Pastorius, Jaco Pastorius (1976)
    48. Woody Shaw, Little Red’s Fantasy (1976)
    49. Pat Metheny, Bright Size Life (1976)
    50. Ralph Towner, Solo Concert (1980)

    What 50 would you list?
    Last edited by Alypius; Jul-01-2014 at 06:30.

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  9. #155
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    Default

    Hard to argue with your list, Alypius.

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  11. #156
    Senior Member starthrower's Avatar
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    I don't have time to list 50, but I'll list some records that made a big impact on me.
    In no particular order:

    George Russell-Ezz-Thetics
    Mal Waldron-The Quest
    Pat Martino-Consciousness
    Oliver Nelson-Straight Ahead
    Thelonious Monk-Brilliant Corners
    Joe Henderson-Inner Urge
    John Scofield-Time On My Hands
    Michael Brecker-s/t
    Dave Holland-Extensions
    Bill Frisell/Kermit Driscoll/Joey Baron-Live
    The Either/Orchestra-Half Life Of Desire
    Pierre Dorge & New Jungle Orchestra-Giraf
    John McLaughlin-Belo Horizonte
    Hermeto Pascoal-Slaves Mass
    Michel Camilo-One More Once
    Archie Shepp-Four For Trane
    Pat Metheny Group-The First Circle
    McCoy Tyner-Together
    Alice Coltrane-Monastic Trio
    Miles Davis-Miles Smiles
    Herbie Hancock-Inventions And Dimensions
    Keith Jarrett-Treasure Island
    Yusef Lateef-Live At Pep's
    Jaco Pastorius-The Birthday Concert
    Roland Kirk-I Talk To The Spirits
    Sonny Simmons/Prince Lasha-The Cry
    Eric Dolphy-Iron Man
    Mark Murphy-Stolen & Other Moments
    Return To Forever-Light As A Feather
    Larry Coryell/Philip Catherine-Splendid
    Tony Williams-Believe It
    Steve Lacy-Momentum
    Mingus-Oh Yeah!
    Don Pullen's African/Brazilian Connection-Kele Mou Bana
    Mulligan/Desmond-Two Of A Mind

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  13. #157
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lope de Aguirre View Post
    Hard to argue with your list, Alypius.
    Thanks. Actually, I argued with myself about it -- a lot! I'm so conscious of who I dropped. From the early era, Jelly Roll Morton, Benny Goodman, Fletcher Henderson, Sidney Bechet, Ella Fitzgerald, for instance. From the Blue Note era, Hank Mobley, Blue Mitchell, Donald Byrd, Jackie MacLean. Great ones from the free jazz movement: Sam Rivers, Anthony Braxton, Pharoah Sanders, Art Ensemble of Chicago, Sun Ra. I argued with myself about choice of individual records. For instance, I love all of Joe Henderson's Blue Note releases; I chose In 'n' Out, but I love Inner Urge and Mode for Joe as much. The same could be said about my choices for Wayne Shorter and any of a dozen others. And, for that matter, how does one choose just one Duke Ellington record. But one has to start people somewhere, and these seemed decent choices.
    Last edited by Alypius; Jul-01-2014 at 05:56.

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    Default Albert Ayler - Live in Greenwich Village: The Complete Impulse Sessions

    I couldn't possibly come up with a list at the moment. My knowledge of Jazz is rudimentary at best but I know what I like and this is one of my very favorite albums...

    Last edited by Morimur; Jul-01-2014 at 14:06.

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  17. #159
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    ESSENTIAL JAZZ -- to me ...

    I quickly went through my collection to note the handful of jazz albums I most listen to. Here's that quick list. Alphabetized by album.

    Acoustic – Gilberto Gil
    Blue Train – John Coltrane
    Brazil Project (I) – Toots Thielemans
    Canyon Lady – Joe Henderson
    Carmen Sings Monk – Carmen McRae
    Collection – Larry Carlton
    Companion – Patricia Barber
    Ella and Louis – Ella F. and Louis A.
    Folkvisor – Jan Johansson
    Givin’ Away the Store 3 – Pat Martino
    Getz/Gilberto – Stan Getz and João Gilberto
    Harlequin – Dave Grusin/Lee Ritenour
    Idle Moments – Grant Green
    Kind of Blue – Miles Davis
    Laid Back – Kenny Burrell
    Letter to Evan -- David Benoit
    Lontano – Tomasz Stanko Quartet
    Loxodonta Africana – Ricky Ford
    Makatuka – Nathan Davis
    Manhatten Symphony – Dexter Gordon Quartet
    Moodswing – Joshua Redman Quartet
    Naked Guitar – Earl Klugh
    Nonaah – Roscoe Mitchell
    Ondas – Mike Nock
    Orchestra of the 80’s – Gerald Wilson
    Play Bach – Jacques Loussier
    Re: Pasolini -- Stefano Battaglia
    Reed Seed – Grover Washington, Jr.
    Songs For Ellen – Joe Pass
    The Best Of … -- Bill Evans
    The Best Of … -- Freddie Hubbard
    The Look of Love – Diana Krall
    The Words and the Days – Enrico Rava Quintet
    Time Out – Dave Brubeck Quartet
    Tomorrow Sky – Kellis Ethridge
    Touchdown – Bob James
    Tutu – Miles Davis
    Yarona – Abdullah Ibrahim Trio

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    Default Miles Davis - (1975) Agharta




    Review by Thom Jurek

    Along with its sister recording, Pangaea, Agharta was recorded live in February of 1975 at the Osaka Festival Hall in Japan. Amazingly enough, given that these are arguably Davis' two greatest electric live records, they were recorded the same day. Agharta was performed in the afternoon and Pangaea in the evening. Of the two, Agharta is superior. The band with Davis -- saxophonist Sonny Fortune, guitarists Pete Cosey (lead) and Reggie Lucas (rhythm), bassist Michael Henderson, drummer Al Foster, and percussionist James Mtume -- was a group who had their roots in the radically streetwise music recorded on 1972's On the Corner, and they are brought to fruition here. The music on Agharta, a total of three tunes spread over two CDs and four LP sides, contains the "Prelude," which clocks in at over a half-hour. There is "Maiysha" from Get up With It and the Agharta "Interlude," which segues into the "Theme From Jack Johnson." The music here is almost totally devoid of melody and harmony, and is steeped into a steamy amalgam of riffs shot through and through with crossing polyrhythms, creating a deep voodoo funk groove for the soloists to inhabit for long periods of time as they solo and interact with one another. Davis' band leading at this time was never more exacting or free. The sense of dynamics created by the stop-start accents and the moods, textures, and colors brought out by this particular interaction of musicians is unparalleled in Davis' live work -- yeah, that includes the Coltrane and Bill Evans bands, but they're like apples and oranges anyway. Driven by the combination of Davis' direction and the soloing of Sonny Fortune and guitarist Pete Cosey, who is as undervalued and underappreciated for his incalculable guitar-slinging gifts as Jimi Hendrix is celebrated for his, and the percussion mania of Mtume, the performance on Agharta is literally almost too much of a good thing to bear. When Cosey starts his solo in the "Prelude" at the 12-minute mark, listeners cannot be prepared for the Hendrixian energy and pure electric whammy-bar weirdness that's about to come splintering out of the speakers. As the band reacts in intensity, the entire proceeding threatens to short out the stereo. These are some of the most screaming notes ever recorded. Luckily, since this is just the first track on the whole package, Davis can bring the tempos down a bit here and there and snake them into spots that I don't think even he anticipated before that afternoon (check the middle of "Maiysha" and the second third of "Jack Johnson" for some truly creepy and beautiful wonders). While Pangaea is awesome as well, there is simply nothing like Agharta in the canon of recorded music. This is the greatest electric funk-rock jazz record ever made -- period.

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  21. #161
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lope de Aguirre View Post
    Lope, As much as I love Agharta, I enjoy the companion piece Pangaea even more. It's noisier and rowdier on "Zimbabwe" (=disc 1) and then darker and yet beautiful on "Gondawana" (=disc 2). The picture you posted is of the American edition, which is much lower quality sound. There are Japanese DSD and Blu-Spec formats that are much superior. The price is about double -- and is worth it! (Though I've seen the price go much higher than that -- the various Japanese versions go in and out of print). Note the different covers (the Japanese DSD and Blu-Spec of Agharta on the left, Pangaea on the right)



    A reviewer on Amazon notes his experience:

    "This is a blue-spec CD, the first I've owned. As promised, and contrary to what some reviews claim, it plays without problems on regular cd players... Agharta is the purest expression of Miles Davis's '70s voodoo funk. The other live double albums of this period, Dark Magus ('74) and Pangaea (recorded on the same day as Agharta in early '75) are also killer, but for sheer unstoppable filthy funkiness, this is the one. It's my understanding that Sony Japan owns and hoards the master tapes to Agharta and Pangaea, which were originally only released there as LPs. At least two versions have been issued there in the last 15 years or so. Not only remastered but remixed, they are substantially different from and superior to the first CDs to come out, the Columbia "Contemporary Masters" editions of 1990... [T]o my ears, this blue-spec cd, which I believe follows an edition of 2009, is the best sounding. The mix is very clear and satisfying. Michael Henderson's bass is meaner, more defined, and you can really distinguish the two guitarists' playing. If you've only heard the US version, you'll be amazed. Bottom line: ... opt for "Made in Japan," especially if you like this music and have only heard the old CDs. Not being able to read the liner notes is a small price to pay for the big improvement in sound."
    Strongly recommended!
    Last edited by Alypius; Jul-02-2014 at 17:18.

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  23. #162
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    Quote Originally Posted by Alypius View Post
    Lope, As much as I love Agharta, I enjoy the companion piece Pangaea even more. It's noisier and rowdier on "Zimbabwe" (=disc 1) and then darker and yet beautiful on "Gondawana" (=disc 2). The picture you posted is of the American edition, which is much lower quality sound. There are Japanese DSD and Blu-Spec formats that are much superior. The price is about double -- and is worth it! (Though I've seen the price go much higher than that -- the various Japanese versions go in and out of print). Note the different covers (the Japanese DSD and Blu-Spec of Agharta on the left, Pangaea on the right)



    A reviewer on Amazon notes his experience:



    Strongly recommended!
    Thanks for the info. I'll have to get a copy of the Japanese edition.

    Now I am listening to Don Ellis' 'Tears of Joy' -- what a great album! I am hooked on this. The music is wickedly complex and exciting. I am surprised Ellis isn't better known.


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  25. #163
    Senior Member starthrower's Avatar
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    Don Ellis was a phenomenal musician, but he's been dead for over 35 years, so he was largely forgotten. I like his early, small group albums, especially Essence. And his work with George Russell. Also, Don's MPS album Soaring.

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  27. #164
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    In a post above, I had asked: What are the essential jazz records? Best 10? 25? 50?

    A few have posted lists and recommendations. My earlier list of 50 deliberately stopped at the year 1980, and I promised that I would follow up with a list of works since 1980. So here's an additional 50, listed in chronological order. As before, I have tried to limit it to one record per artist, but have in a few cases listed a second one. And I've deliberately biased it toward works since 2000. I hope that it proves helpful to those who don't know the current scene. And for those of you who do, I hope it proves provocative enough that you will post rival lists of your own.

    1. Steve Tibbetts - Yr (1980)
    2. Wynton Marsalis - Black Codes (from the Underground) (1985)
    3. Bela Fleck - Bela Fleck and the Flecktones (1990)
    4. John Abercrombie - While We’re Young (1993)
    5. Dave Douglas - In Our Lifetime (1994)
    6. Joshua Redman - Moodswing (1995)
    7. John Zorn / Bar Kokhba - The Circle Maker (1998)
    8. Brad Mehldau - The Art of the Trio, Vol. 3: Songs (1998)
    9. Bill Frisell - Good Dog, Happy Man (1999)
    10. Kenny Garrett - Songbook (1999)
    11. Steve Turre - Lotus Flower (1999)
    12. Dave Holland (Quintet) - Prime Directive (1999)
    13. Andrew Hill - Dusk (2000)
    14. Dave Douglas - Soul on Soul (2000)
    15. Either / Orchestra - More Beautiful Than Death (2000)
    16. Chris Potter - Gratitude (2001)
    17. Greg Osby - Symbols of Light: A Solution (2001)
    18. Herbie Hancock / Michael Brecker / Roy Hargrove - Directions in Music: Live at Massey Hall (2002)
    19. Dave Holland (Big Band) - What Goes Around (2002)
    20. Tomasz Stanko - Soul of Things (2002)
    21. Dave Douglas - The Infinite (2002)
    22. Nels Cline Singers - Instrumentals (2002)
    23. Terence Blanchard - Bounce (2003)
    24. Matthew Shipp - Equilibrium (2003)
    25. Michael Brecker - Wide Angles (2003)
    26. William Parker - O’Neal’s Porch (2003)
    27. Kenny Wheeler - What Now? (2005)
    28. Pat Metheny Group - The Way Up (2005)
    29. Enrico Pieranunzi - Live in Paris (2006)
    30. Donny McCaslin - In Pursuit (2007)
    31. Anouar Brahem - Voyage de Sahar (2007)
    32. Pat Metheny & Brad Mehldau - Quartet (2007)
    33. The Bad Plus - Prog (2007)
    34. Roy Hargrove - Earfood (2008)
    35. Marcin Wasilewski - January (2008)
    36. Nik Bärtsch’s Ronin - Holon (2008)
    37. Todd Sickafoose - Tiny Resistors (2008)
    38. Ben Allison - Little Things Run the World (2008)
    39. Darcy James Argue’s Secret Society - Infernal Machines (2009)
    40. Tom Harrell - Prana Dance (2009)
    41. Medeski, Martin & Wood - Radiolarians II (2009)
    42. Jon Hassell - Last Night the Moon Came Dropping ... (2009)
    43. Christian Scott - Yesterday You Said Tomorrow (2010)
    44. David Sanchez / Stefon Harris / Christian Scott - Ninety Miles (2011)
    45. Vijay Iyer - Acclerando (2012)
    46. Joe Locke / Geoffrey Keezer - Signing (2012)
    47. Kurt Rosenwinkel - Star of Jupiter (2012)
    48. Jeff Parker - Bright Light in Winter (2012)
    49. Gary Burton - Guided Tour (2013)
    50. Orrin Evans’ Captain Black Big Band - Mother’s Touch (2014)
    Last edited by Alypius; Jul-04-2014 at 20:01.

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  29. #165
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    Default Herbie Hancock: Crossings

    Loving this album.


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