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Thread: The Jazz Hole

  1. #3661
    Senior Member Mollie John's Avatar
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    Sun Ra - The Heliocentric Worlds of Sun Ra Volume 1- ESP-Disk

    Sun Ra (p, mba, cel, perc), Chris Capers (t), Teddy Nance (tb), Bernard Pettaway (b tb), Danny Davis (f, as), Marshall Allen (picc, as, perc), Robert Cummings (bcl, perc), John Gilmore (ts, perc), Pat Patrick (bs, perc), Ronnie Boykins (b) and Jimhmi Johnson (perc). Rec. 1965

    Link to complete album -

    https://www.youtube.com/playlist?lis...xIMzr8f192w0Dg

    "Ra had been making albums for his own label Saturn for a decade by the time this one slipped out via ESP-Disk, but this was the first to make a wide impact due not only to the unprecedented nature of the music (some tracks sound closer to Tibetan Buddhist music than anything being played in the America at the time) but also to the fact that ESP-Disk, a tiny label making a big noise at the time, actually got distributed outside of Chicago and New York and even made a splash internationally. Ra was on the vinyl map and never looked back. Next stop, Jupiter."

    Jazzwise
    100 Jazz Albums That Shook The World
    # 48
    Last edited by Mollie John; Oct-03-2019 at 13:14.

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    Senior Member Mollie John's Avatar
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    Sonny Rollins - The Bridge - RCA Victor

    Rollins (ts), Jim Hall (g), Bob Cranshaw (b), Ben Riley and Harry Saunders (d).
    Rec. 1962


    Link to complete album -

    https://www.youtube.com/playlist?lis...Y8MKSI0M7Uz74Y

    "There is a curious reluctance for some to acknowledge that Rollins came back from his 1959-61 voluntary exile a more complete and fascinatingly complex musician. The Bridge is enduring testimony to that fact: he has shed all stylistic baggage, leads from the front, plays with a new poise and freshness and with a unique identity that has stayed intact up to the present day. Although late-50s Rollins may be the stuff to get the critics panting, this was the template for all future Rollins creative ventures, whether they be avant-garde or retro or just plain Sonny. Unbeatable music."

    Jazzwise
    100 Jazz Albums That Shook The World
    # 47
    Last edited by Mollie John; Oct-03-2019 at 13:13.

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    Senior Member Mollie John's Avatar
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    Andrew Hill - Point of Departure - Blue Note

    Hill (p), Kenny Dorham (t), Eric Dolphy (f, as, bcl), Joe Henderson (ts, f), Richard Davis (b) and Tony Williams (d). Rec. 1964


    Link to complete album -

    https://www.youtube.com/playlist?lis...6-UM9_2zuhewFy

    "Hill’s is of course a multi-faced talent – a brilliant pianist and improviser, he is also one of jazz’s outstanding composer-arrangers. This album emphasises the latter talents: he uses his highly personal sense of composition and instrumental colour much as Jelly Roll Morton did back in the late 1920s, bringing out sensational new sonorities and ideas between the select group of musicians he is using here and goading them to some of their most eloquent playing, individually and collectively. When those musicians include the front line we have here, that makes for some very special music indeed."

    Jazzwise
    100 Jazz Albums That Shook The World
    # 46
    Last edited by Mollie John; Oct-03-2019 at 13:12.

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    Senior Member Mollie John's Avatar
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    John Coltrane - Impressions - Impulse!

    Coltrane (ss, ts), Eric Dolphy (bcl, as), McCoy Tyner (p), Reggie Workman, Art Davis, Jimmy Garrison (b) and Elvin Jones (d). Rec. 1961 and 1963

    "This was Coltrane’s second scoop into the Aladdin’s cave of music he’d made at the Village Vanguard in November 1961. The first, released as At The Village Vanguard in 1962, had whipped up a storm of criticism and, through the blues ‘Chasin’ The Trane’, served notice to a new generation about the music to come. This one went even further – India threw open the floodgates to the east in jazz, while ‘Impressions’ is 14 minutes of solid gold inspiration from Trane and Elvin. The 1963 studio fillers, ‘Up Against The Wall’ and ‘After The Rain’, are two exquisite musical punctuation points."

    Jazzwise
    100 Jazz Albums That Shook The World
    # 45

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    Senior Member Bwv 1080's Avatar
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    Mahler Jazz

    "Ging heut' Morgen über's Feld", second song of Lieder eines fahrenden Gesellen (also Symphony #1 first movement) nice little nod to the Symph 1 Finale in the bass solo around 3:10


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    Senior Member Mollie John's Avatar
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    George Russell The Jazz - Workshop - RCA Victor

    George Russell (comp, arr, boombams), Art Farmer (t), Hal McKusick (as, f), Barry Galbraith (g), Bill Evans (p), Milt Hinton, Teddy Kotick (b), Joe Harris, Paul Motian and Osie Johnson (d). Rec. 1956

    Link to complete album -

    https://www.youtube.com/playlist?lis...mgCaIULi3Cr05s

    "One of the most important jazz albums ever. Using just six players, Russell achieves wonderful orchestral textures within these 12 compositions, thanks partly to guitarist Galbraith, and introduces the world to modal jazz (and Bill Evans) en route. Strange new harmonies, polyrhythms, pantonality and extended composition – with Russell and Gil Evans, jazz just became a complete new zone of potentialities. More influential on the jazz community directly, on Miles, Coltrane and Oliver Nelson, than through its sales, this is the one that so many musicians still check out. A masterpiece of small group playing and a masterclass on the role of composition in the music."

    Jazzwise
    100 Jazz Albums That Shook The World
    # 44

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    Miles Davis - Sketches Of Spain - Columbia

    Davis (t, flhn), orchestra and Gil Evans (cond, arr). Rec. 1960

    Link to complete album -

    https://www.youtube.com/playlist?lis...9F6E4D47DD5B45

    "Miles already had two bona-fide large-group masterpieces for Columbia down in the plus column with Miles Ahead and Porgy & Bess by the time he and Gil Evans assembled this finely-drawn re-workings of classical pieces of music generally associated with Spain. At its core is the brooding central movement from Rodrigo’s Concierto de Aranjuez, but the poignant lyricism and incandescent colours Miles and Gil invest the other pieces, including a rare Evans original, with a singularity of vision and intent that makes this a burningly bright and unified achievement. Once more they’d broken the mould, for themselves and everyone else."

    Jazzwise
    100 Jazz Albums That Shook The World
    # 43

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    Stan Getz - Focus - Verve

    Getz (ts), Roy Haynes (d), chamber string group and Hershey Kay (cond). Rec. 1961

    Link to complete album -

    https://www.youtube.com/playlist?lis...3DFFA4907C5EA3

    "Nothing in the history of jazz soloist-plus-strings recordings could prepare the uninitiated listener for what this album delivers. Getz’s commission to his favourite arranger/composer Eddie Sauter was completely open-ended. What Sauter delivered was a suite that stood up as music independently of anything Getz might add melodically but that left him plenty of room to create the most gorgeous tapestry of sound and emotion, interweaving between all the richness of Sauter’s lean, expressive scores. Focus stands in glorious isolation even within the jazz tradition but is a certifiable classic within the genre that others still cite in awe."

    Jazzwise
    100 Jazz Albums That Shook The World
    # 42

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    Chick Corea - Return To Forever - ECM

    Corea (el p), Joe Farrell (f, ss), Stanley Clarke (el b), Airto Moreira (d, perc) and Flora Purim (v). Rec. 1972

    "By the time he made this date, Corea had worked his way through a heavy avant-garde phase and out onto the sunlit plains of his own latin-based musical imagination. It had always been there in his music, but now, marrying the élan and high spirits of Flora Purim and Airto with his own naturally ebullient and melodically uplifting inclinations, Corea suddenly not only stepped forward himself past the stentorian gloom and machismo of the other fusioneers of the day, but redefined exactly what latin jazz should be about. Intoxicating music played by masters makes this an era-defining milestone."

    Jazzwise
    100 Jazz Albums That Shook The World
    # 41

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    Senior Member Mollie John's Avatar
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    Billie Holiday - At JATP - Clef/Verve

    Holiday (v), Howard McGhee, Buck Clayton (t), Trummy Young (tb),Willie Smith (as), Illinois Jacquet, Wardell Gray, Coleman Hawkins, Lester Young (ts), Milt Raskin, Ken Kersey, Tommy Tucker (p), Charles Mingus, Al McKibbon (b), J.C. Heard and Jackie Mills (d). Rec. 1945-47

    Link to complete album -

    https://www.youtube.com/playlist?lis...7787D6DB8241CD

    "People call Billie Holiday THE voice of jazz. However, her discography on vinyl is convoluted: her 1930s 78rpm output, where she was normally a featured singer rather than the star, had to wait until the 1960s to appear in any ordered way and the 1990s to appear substantially on CD. Ditto her 1940s Deccas. By the time she settled with Verve in 1952 her voice had darkened and lost its suppleness. This set of live performances from the mid-40s, however, finds her in good musicianly company, vocally at a peak and expressively in the mood to sweep all before her across a classic selection of material, including ‘Strange Fruit’ and ‘Billie’s Blues’."

    Jazzwise
    100 Jazz Albums That Shook The World
    # 40
    Last edited by Mollie John; Oct-05-2019 at 13:49.

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    Tony Williams Lifetime - Emergency! - Polydor

    Tony Williams (d), Larry Young (org) and John McLaughlin (g). Rec. 1969.

    Link to complete album -

    https://www.youtube.com/playlist?lis...gnXltmqHZSoZqq

    "This bold attempt to expand the boundaries of jazz in a dramatic jazz, blues, rock, Hendrix, MC5 amalgam left temperate listeners shell shocked and critics speechless. Today, the mere mention of jazz-rock prompts cries from establishment critics of “sell-out,” but if this is selling-out, then maybe they should consider another line of work. This is jazz, rhythm and electricity writ large in a tumbling roller coaster of ideas. No wonder the album was called Emergency, with every member of the band having so much to say but so little time to say it."

    Jazzwise
    100 Jazz Albums That Shook The World
    # 39

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    Senior Member Mollie John's Avatar
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    Cannonball Adderley - Somethin’ Else - Blue Note

    Adderley (as), Miles Davis (t), Hank Jones (p), Sam Jones (b) and Art Blakey (d). Rec. 1959

    Link to complete album -

    https://www.youtube.com/playlist?lis...XdimOXsMK4uVNv

    "Adderley was about to push into the soul-jazz era when he made this one-off for Blue Note. In a sense it was a vale to what had passed between the altoist and Miles Davis during the time they shared the bandstand in the Miles Davis Sextet, complete with Miles’ compulsive borrowings from Ahmad Jamal and the delicate balance struck between the beautiful simplicity of the emerging modernist simplicity and Cannon’s natural ebullience. Miles got the altoist to shine through ballads and burnished blowing throughout, complementing in fine style while the rest of the crew kept a discreet distance. The Blue Note RVG version contain an extra track from this session."

    Jazzwise
    100 Jazz Albums That Shook The World
    # 38

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    Senior Member Mollie John's Avatar
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    Charles Mingus - The Black Saint And The Sinner Lady - Impulse!

    Rolf Ericson, Richard Williams (t), Quentin Jackson (tb), Don Butterfield (tba), Jerome Richardson (fl, ss, bar s), Dick Hafer (fl, ts), Charlie Mariano (as), Jaki Byard (p), Jay Berliner (g), Charles Mingus (b, p) and Dannie Richmond (d). Rec. 1963

    Link to complete album -

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zFA0FYQo0Gg

    "Maybe you have to acquire a taste for Mingus before getting to this, but I’ve known people with significant non-Mingus backgrounds fall headlong for it at first hearing. Whether you come from Ellington or from Coltrane or from blues-bands, there’s stuff from this almost continuous suite to captivate you. Even techno fans – no sampling as such – will find early creative use of editing, recycling and overdubbing. Even more creative is the work of soloists such as Jackson, Byard and the amazing Mariano (later of ECM and all points east), and the unaccompanied flamenco guitar part apparently written note-for-note by Mingus himself."

    Jazzwise
    100 Jazz Albums That Shook The World
    # 37
    Last edited by Mollie John; Oct-06-2019 at 13:39.

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    Ella Fitzgerald - Sings The Cole Porter Songbook - Verve

    Fitzgerald (v) and the Buddy Bregman Orchestra. Rec. 1956

    Link to complete album -

    https://www.youtube.com/playlist?lis...DbFM7Xe6BdgKzK

    "Norman Granz had long cherished the ambition to have Ella recording for his label but had to wait until 1956 to make the signing. His first project for her was to record as many Cole Porter songs as they could lay their hands on in large ensemble style and release them (initially as volumes one and two) on an unsuspecting but quickly enraptured public. The idea caught on and Ella kept doing composer songbooks well into the 1960s. Nobody did it better, even though it could be said that Sinatra’s studious avoidance of such anthologies produced the greater individual legacy."


    Jazzwise
    100 Jazz Albums That Shook The World
    # 36

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    Duke Ellington - Ellington At Newport - Columbia

    Ellington (p), Willie Cook, Ray Nance, Clark Terry, Cat Anderson (t), Britt Woodman, Quentin Jackson, John Sanders (tb), Johnny Hodges, Russell Procope (as), Jimmy Hamilton (cl, ts), Paul Gonsalves (ts), Harry Carney (bar s), Jimmy Woode (b) and Sam Woodyard (d). Rec. 1956

    Link to complete album -

    https://www.youtube.com/playlist?lis...AQrNPGphOqVI2m

    "Ellington often acknowledged that the 1956 Newport Jazz Festival offered him a virtual rebirth in terms of his in-person and recording career but there is little doubt as to why. Apart from the on-site near-riot after the conclusion of ‘Diminuendo And Crescendo in Blue’, this is a well-paced record for a lounge-chair audience wanting to know what the excitement was all about. The fact that 60 per cent of the original (including just about all of The Festival Suite) was recorded in the studio in the following days due to onstage microphone problems was only confirmed decades later."

    Jazzwise
    100 Jazz Albums That Shook The World
    # 35

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