Page 296 of 305 FirstFirst ... 196246286292293294295296297298299300 ... LastLast
Results 4,426 to 4,440 of 4561

Thread: The Jazz Hole

  1. #4426
    Senior Member norman bates's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Posts
    3,787
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by SanAntone View Post
    Yeah, well, the only I brought it up was because norman bates has been arguing with me about this for several pages here.

    And anyway, it wasn't Ken Burns saying that, it was the avant-garde musicians themselves. Which is a welcome message, IMO - and one that does not have an expiration date.

    Ken Burns JAZZ series is the best serious historical survey of jazz I've ever seen. Anyone interested in this music would benefit from watching it.
    For what I know a lot of jazz musicians didn't care for the label jazz, Duke Ellington included. Musicians hate to be pigeonholed, because they know that they will be judged for the prejudices tied to being part or not of a certain genre and its "rules" and not on their own merits.
    Think about your own tastes: you like to hear a lot of avantgarde music, but if that kind of sound arrives from a black musician that is considered is some way as jazz you don't like it because "it's not jazz, is too european".
    The art ensemble probably to avoid people saying "your music is not jazz" decided to say "ok, we're not jazz, we make great black music".
    Besides this, if I remember correctly the Ken Burns series used a lot the point of view of Wynton Marsalis and Stanley Crouch, so surprise surprise they stressed this point.
    Last edited by norman bates; Oct-30-2020 at 10:10.
    What time is the next swan?

  2. #4427
    Senior Member SanAntone's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2020
    Location
    Tennessee
    Posts
    3,010
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Like Someone in Love is an album by Art Blakey and The Jazz Messengers. It was recorded in August 1960, at the same sessions which produced A Night in Tunisia, but was released on Blue Note only in August 1967.

    519SMSN6RNL._SY355_.jpg

    Art Blakey – drums
    Lee Morgan – trumpet, flugelhorn
    Wayne Shorter – tenor saxophone
    Bobby Timmons – piano
    Jymie Merritt – bass

    Art Blakey is arguably the most important bandleader in the last half of the 20th century. The Jazz Messengers was a veritable graduate school for musicians who went on to become some of the most important soloists, stylists and bandleaders on their own. Just to name two who I think are especially important were Wayne Shorter and Wynton Marsalis.

  3. Likes Barbebleu, Joe B liked this post
  4. #4428
    Senior Member Jay's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
    Posts
    375
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default



    Quote Originally Posted by SanAntone View Post
    So, I'm wondering what the debate is?
    Jism magazine critic: "Isn't jazz, as we know it, dead?"

    Lester Bowie: "Well, it all depends on what you know."

  5. #4429
    Senior Member SanAntone's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2020
    Location
    Tennessee
    Posts
    3,010
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    The Big Beat is an album by Art Blakey and his group The Jazz Messengers recorded on March 6, 1960 and released on the Blue Note label.

    51AZXRNZ6JL._SX466_.jpg

    Art Blakey — drums
    Lee Morgan — trumpet, flugelhorn
    Wayne Shorter — tenor saxophone
    Bobby Timmons — piano
    Jymie Merritt — bass

    This is probably my favorite line-up of the Jazz Messengers. The combination of Lee Morgan and Wayne Shorter produced some great blowing, and of course the Shorter originals. Bu right up to the end of his life, Blakey put together great bands.

    Jism magazine
    Porn?

  6. Likes Barbebleu liked this post
  7. #4430
    Senior Member SanAntone's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2020
    Location
    Tennessee
    Posts
    3,010
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    LOUIS ARMSTRONG - The complete RCA Victor Recordings

    Louis_Armstrong_complete.jpg

    This very attractively boxed set of four CD’s, comes with a comprehensive discography and excellent sleeve notes written by Dan Morgenstern, Director of Jazz Studies at Rutgers University in the USA. The music covers a very important period in the life of Louis Armstrong, 1932 to 1958.

  8. #4431
    Senior Member SanAntone's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2020
    Location
    Tennessee
    Posts
    3,010
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    BBB & Co. (subtitled Benny, Ben & Barney) is an album by swing musicians Benny Carter, Ben Webster and Barney Bigard recorded in 1962 and originally released by the Swingville label.

    619MMCG0J5L.gif

    Benny Carter is one of the great alto sax players, arranger, and bandleader that is somewhat neglected when jazz giants are mentioned. This album where he is joined by two other giants, Ben Webster and Barney Bigard, features some great blowing which is plenty enough.

  9. #4432
    Senior Member SanAntone's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2020
    Location
    Tennessee
    Posts
    3,010
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by norman bates View Post
    Think about your own tastes: you like to hear a lot of avantgarde music, but if that kind of sound arrives from a black musician that is considered is some way as jazz you don't like it because "it's not jazz, is too european".
    I am interested in the classical music being written today but often don't repeat listen to most of what I hear. I might listen to a lot of it for a while then go months, maybe even years, before I listen to it again. But I haven't listened to any avant-garde jazz for decades.

    Your conclusions about my thinking are off the mark.
    Last edited by SanAntone; Oct-30-2020 at 20:50.

  10. #4433
    Senior Member SanAntone's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2020
    Location
    Tennessee
    Posts
    3,010
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Attachment 145167

    Bennie Moten - 1923-1932

    Pianist and bandleader Bennie Moten was an important figure as one of the primary pioneers and architects of the Kansas City sound, playing a style that developed from the orchestral ragtime popular in the region, with a stomping beat and an emphasis on informal riff-based arrangements of a broad, but often blues-flavoured repertoire which left plenty of room for improvisation.

    His was the most prominent of the early territory bands, and he was able to attract a stream of talented young musicians to his Kansas City Orchestra, notable among them Count Basie, Hot Lips Page, Walter Page, Ben Webster, Eddie Durham and the great blues shouting vocalist Jimmy Rushing. His career was short, curtailed by his untimely death in 1935 at the age of 40, at which point his band became the core of Count Basie's first ensemble.

    This great value 48-track 2-CD collection draws recordings, presented in chronological order, from the majority of the recording sessions which he undertook during the decade before the Depression took its toll on many bands' recording activities, Moten's among them, and it's a thoroughly enjoyable and entertaining look at an important niche in the annals of the genre.

  11. #4434
    Senior Member SanAntone's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2020
    Location
    Tennessee
    Posts
    3,010
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Basie Reunion is an album by Count Basie Orchestra members led by jazz saxophonist Paul Quinichette featuring tracks recorded in 1958 and released on the Prestige label.

    51uUUZy7nWL.jpg

    Paul Quinichette – tenor saxophone
    Buck Clayton – trumpet
    Shad Collins – trumpet
    Jack Washington – baritone saxophone
    Nat Pierce – piano
    Freddie Green – guitar
    Eddie Jones – bass
    Jo Jones – drums

    Really nice swinging blowing session with members of the Basie band.

  12. #4435
    Senior Member SanAntone's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2020
    Location
    Tennessee
    Posts
    3,010
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    “He told one interviewer that his orchestra played “unadulterated American Negro music,” not jazz or swing. Ellington was acutely conscious of art's responsibility to represent experience and of the inability of European forms of music and media to represent the particular experiences of his life. The forms of his music and the sounds of his orchestra presented an alternative system of representation based in sound, form, and social function on the blues.”

    — The Ellington Century by David Schiff

    It doesn't matter if it is called jazz. The point is that this music was created out of the blues and by American Negroes. There is a universality about it, though, and musicians who are not black can participate - if they assimilate and master the skills required to play the music.

  13. #4436
    Senior Member norman bates's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Posts
    3,787
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by SanAntone View Post
    “He told one interviewer that his orchestra played “unadulterated American Negro music,” not jazz or swing. Ellington was acutely conscious of art's responsibility to represent experience and of the inability of European forms of music and media to represent the particular experiences of his life. The forms of his music and the sounds of his orchestra presented an alternative system of representation based in sound, form, and social function on the blues.”

    — The Ellington Century by David Schiff

    It doesn't matter if it is called jazz. The point is that this music was created out of the blues and by American Negroes. There is a universality about it, though, and musicians who are not black can participate - if they assimilate and master the skills required to play the music.
    the thing is, that even those black musicians are interested in european music and made those parts of jazz. While Ellington had said that, Jazz critics in their time accused Ellington to not being jazz for "being too classical" (and even that his blues pieces weren't true blues, which is absurd in my opinion). Like classical critics accused composers like Bartok for using popular material. My problem with these kind of positions based on purity, is the idea of judging the music not because of its own value but on the fact of respecting certain requirements. Also, while I love blues and swing and I think that they have absolutely a place in contemporary jazz, I also think that music, as alway has done, changes and evolves. Like rock, that at first was essentialy swinging jazz music with boogie woogie elements (rock'n'roll), that lost (well, not entirely fortunately) the swing element, the "roll", and still produced interesting music. Like classical music that went from Perotinus to Monteverdi to Bach to Beethoven to Stravinsky to Ligeti.
    Jazz existed even before swing, and it was already a melting pot of influences (the "spanish tinge" for instance) so I don't understand why it should not be also something besides blues and swing (and I repeat, I LOVE blues and swing) if it's done well. I guess it's more a matter of expectations. Sometimes we go to a genre expecting a certain sound, and no matter how good the result is, if what we listen is not we were expecting to listen.
    Last edited by norman bates; Oct-31-2020 at 10:53.
    What time is the next swan?

  14. #4437
    Senior Member SanAntone's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2020
    Location
    Tennessee
    Posts
    3,010
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    I remember liking Henry Threadgill back in the early 1980s, his writing for the sextet I found very interesting and quirky.



    Gateway

    I had to search a little to find this clip, since I couldn't remember the title but did recall the cover photograph and approximate time period. There was a follow-up but this album was the only one that I liked enough to listen to more than once.
    Last edited by SanAntone; Oct-31-2020 at 14:05.

  15. #4438
    Senior Member SanAntone's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2020
    Location
    Tennessee
    Posts
    3,010
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    What are your favorite books about jazz?

    Some of mine

    Stomping the Blues - Albert Murray
    Hear Me Talkin' to Ya - Nat Hentoff
    Kansas City Lighting - Stanley Crouch
    Swing That Music - Louis Armstrong
    Satchmo: The Genius of Louis Armstrong - Gary Giddins
    The Jazz Tradition - Martin Williams
    Last edited by SanAntone; Nov-02-2020 at 02:40.

  16. #4439
    Senior Member SanAntone's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2020
    Location
    Tennessee
    Posts
    3,010
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default



    JALC Orchestra plays the music of Miles Davis

    Some great charts and blowing on this nicely put together concert of music by Miles Davis.

  17. #4440
    Senior Member SanAntone's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2020
    Location
    Tennessee
    Posts
    3,010
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Some really nice jazz released in 2019 by the Eric Reed Quartet - Everybody Gets the Blues

    Eric-Reed-EVERYBODY-GETS-THE-BLUES-Cover-1500px.jpg

Similar Threads

  1. Art Tatum: great jazz pianist or greatest jazz pianist?
    By regressivetransphobe in forum Non-Classical Music
    Replies: 25
    Last Post: Aug-09-2017, 07:51
  2. Chamber Music Black Hole - c.1800s - 1830/40s
    By elgars ghost in forum Solo & Chamber Music
    Replies: 13
    Last Post: Feb-09-2014, 13:04
  3. Replies: 2
    Last Post: Jul-10-2012, 23:03

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •