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Thread: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart

  1. #661
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    I've been trying to tell everyone this , about how Mozart is the Divine, the greatest genius in music. No one will listen,,,Only those who know Mozart, know what I am saying
    Why does everyone challenge this edict?
    Why?
    Mozart was far superior to Beethoven. Why deny it?
    Why?


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    Senior Member flamencosketches's Avatar
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    I'm with you paul. Mozart was a master. On a good day he was greater than anybody. Divine is not too big a stretch of the imagination. Having said that, I see no reason to trash Beethoven to praise him. Both are worthy of their place, though I agree Mozart (and Bach) was greater. I adore all three.

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    Senior Member Janspe's Avatar
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    Mozart is a composer to whom it's always such an immense joy to return - I might stay away from his work for quite a long period of time, but then I listen to the clarinet concerto, or Così fan tutte, or whichever work - and bang! I suddenly need to go through the string quintets, the masses, the symphonies, the violin sonatas... It's like an euphoric fever that doesn't let go of me. And I don't mind!

    I'm currently going through the 21 solo piano concertos (yes, not 27 since I'm only including fully original works) with my significant other since they're quite unfamiliar with most of them. I love all of them so much, even the lesser-known earlier works. Heck, even the very first one (D major, K.175) is a joy from the first note to the last.

    Slightly off-topic but not completely: does anyone else feel the absolutely terrifying pressure of time on their shoulders when trying to explore music? I mean, we all have just one lifetime, and that means one will run out of time eventually... And there's so much music to familiarize oneself with, let alone all the music to re-listen to again and again. I've been embarking on huge Bach and Haydn projects recently (among many others) and I just feel like my head is about to explode because there's so much to do.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Janspe View Post
    Slightly off-topic but not completely: does anyone else feel the absolutely terrifying pressure of time on their shoulders when trying to explore music? I mean, we all have just one lifetime, and that means one will run out of time eventually... And there's so much music to familiarize oneself with, let alone all the music to re-listen to again and again. I've been embarking on huge Bach and Haydn projects recently (among many others) and I just feel like my head is about to explode because there's so much to do.
    Every day my friend. It's what wakes me up early in the morning and keeps me up late at night, and keeps me going throughout the day wish I had more hours in the day just to hear more music...one lifetime is not enough...

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    Senior Member Kjetil Heggelund's Avatar
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    Yesterday I decided to listen to Mozart's works written between 1773 to 1777 in Salzburg. I already got one "wow" experience, seeing and hearing the big leap between his 24th and 25th symphonies, apparently in just 2 days! I thought it will be a great way to listen to his music, being aware of the period and place he was in. Maybe my ears will grow to learn and distinguish his Salzburg court period from everything else

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    Senior Member millionrainbows's Avatar
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    There's no question that Mozart was a consummate craftsman, and that he produced profound works. Yet, there are limits to be recognized before making broad, sweeping statements that mozart is "better" than Beethoven.
    Even Mozart was not God; he was subject to the limitations of his time. Harmonic limitations, instrumental limitations, limitations of the Classical period.
    I repeat, MOZART IS NOT GOD.
    "The way out is through the door. Why is it that no one will use this method?"
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    "In Spring! In the creation of art it must be as it is in Spring!" -Arnold Schoenberg

    "We only become what we are by the radical and deep-seated refusal of that which others have made us." -Jean-Paul Sartre

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    Quote Originally Posted by millionrainbows View Post
    There's no question that Mozart was a consummate craftsman, and that he produced profound works. Yet, there are limits to be recognized before making broad, sweeping statements that mozart is "better" than Beethoven.
    Even Mozart was not God; he was subject to the limitations of his time. Harmonic limitations, instrumental limitations, limitations of the Classical period.
    I repeat, MOZART IS NOT GOD.
    Reading Bruno Walters notes on Mozart, in the Last 6 syms, LP set,,,you'd reconsider what you just said.
    Maybe not a god, but certainly some divinity surrounds his image to this day.
    Genius of his stature is not found too often. If ever again. I am quite confident Bach was his inspiration. Others may know more of this connection, I've seen this comment somewhere before.

  10. #668
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    Quote Originally Posted by paulbest View Post
    Reading Bruno Walters notes on Mozart, in the Last 6 syms, LP set,,,you'd reconsider what you just said.
    Maybe not a god, but certainly some divinity surrounds his image to this day.
    Genius of his stature is not found too often. If ever again. I am quite confident Bach was his inspiration. Others may know more of this connection, I've seen this comment somewhere before.
    There's a whole load of quotes about Mozart listed somewhere on this Forum. A thread called Mozart: God or Garbage might be the one I vaguely recall from a long time ago. That thread looked at Mozart's achievements from all angles and viewpoints. It contained some side-busting comments about Mozart, I seem to recall.

    On the reference to Mozart's suggested membership of the "Divine", I think it was Tchaikovsky who said that Mozart was the "musical Christ" and Beethoven "God the Father", or something along those lines. This would appear to be a rather fence-sitting description, but I think it is well known that Tchaikovsky had a particularly high regard for Mozart, with one of his main works being named after Mozart. His work on the whole (dare I use the word?) "sounds" more Mozartian than Beethovenian, if anything.

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    Senior Member flamencosketches's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Partita View Post
    There's a whole load of quotes about Mozart listed somewhere on this Forum. A thread called Mozart: God or Garbage might be the one I vaguely recall from a long time ago. That thread looked at Mozart's achievements from all angles and viewpoints. It contained some side-busting comments about Mozart, I seem to recall.

    On the reference to Mozart's suggested membership of the "Divine", I think it was Tchaikovsky who said that Mozart was the "musical Christ" and Beethoven "God the Father", or something along those lines. This would appear to be a rather fence-sitting description, but I think it is well known that Tchaikovsky had a particularly high regard for Mozart, with one of his main works being named after Mozart. His work on the whole (dare I use the word?) "sounds" more Mozartian than Beethovenian, if anything.
    This thread sounds hilarious, do you have a link to it? I promise I won't resurrect the drama.

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    Quote Originally Posted by flamencosketches View Post
    This thread sounds hilarious, do you have a link to it? I promise I won't resurrect the drama.
    Mozart: God or Garbage?

    Apparently, this forum considers him closer to God than garbage.

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    Quote Originally Posted by bharbeke View Post
    Mozart: God or Garbage?

    Apparently, this forum considers him closer to God than garbage.
    Mozart when discussed among musicologists will often toss around terms like *The Divine*

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    Senior Member flamencosketches's Avatar
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    Why is Bruno Walter's Mozart always so damn good?! This is much faster than the other version in my library, Benjamin Britten/English Chamber Orchestra. But it loses no sense of drama.

    Still on the lookout for a good HIP recording of Mozart symphonies... none of those I've heard really did it for me, sadly. But until then I'm perfectly satisfied with Bruno Walter, Neville Marriner, and Karl Böhm. (As for his operas, René Jacobs is a really good HIP Mozart conductor–I don't know if he ever recorded any symphonies)
    Last edited by flamencosketches; Jun-04-2019 at 01:36.

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    Senior Member millionrainbows's Avatar
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    I was impressed by Peter Maag's Mozart.



    From a review: Although not very well known, Peter Maag is a fine conductor with a particular genius for the music of Mozart -- which he amply exhibits on this CD. My favorite of the works presented herein is the delightful Symphony No. 32. Although only about ten minutes in length this symphony is a genuine masterpiece, and Maag's conducting of this little gem presents it in all its sparkle and beauty. This superb performance alone is worth the price of the CD which, however, is filled with a full eighty minutes of outstanding performances of various lesser known works by Mozart.
    Last edited by millionrainbows; Jun-04-2019 at 05:03.
    "The way out is through the door. Why is it that no one will use this method?"
    -Confucious

    "In Spring! In the creation of art it must be as it is in Spring!" -Arnold Schoenberg

    "We only become what we are by the radical and deep-seated refusal of that which others have made us." -Jean-Paul Sartre

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  17. #674
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    When people see something they don't comprehend - they often invoke god.

    There's no need to refer to anything supernatural and divine when thinking about Mozart's music.

    Just admit lack of comprehension and leave it at that.

  18. #675
    Senior Member flamencosketches's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by millionrainbows View Post
    I was impressed by Peter Maag's Mozart.



    From a review: Although not very well known, Peter Maag is a fine conductor with a particular genius for the music of Mozart -- which he amply exhibits on this CD. My favorite of the works presented herein is the delightful Symphony No. 32. Although only about ten minutes in length this symphony is a genuine masterpiece, and Maag's conducting of this little gem presents it in all its sparkle and beauty. This superb performance alone is worth the price of the CD which, however, is filled with a full eighty minutes of outstanding performances of various lesser known works by Mozart.
    I really like Maag's Mendelssohn 3rd symphony. I could see him pulling off Mozart pretty well.

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