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Thread: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart

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    Senior Member Bach's Avatar
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    Lightbulb Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart

    I cannot believe this hasn't already been created.

    Clarity, balance, and transparency are hallmarks of his work. A more simplistic notion of the delicacy of his music obscures the exceptional power of some of his finest masterpieces, such as the Piano Concerto No. 24 in C minor, K. 491, the Symphony No. 40 in G minor, K. 550, and the opera Don Giovanni.

    It is only through recognizing the violence and sensuality at the center of Mozart's work that we can make a start towards a comprehension of his structures and an insight into his magnificence.
    Si vos agnosco is tunc vos es quoque erudio

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    Clarinet Concerto, i love it.
    Symphony 36th, not one of the most popular but it was one of the pieces
    i used to listen a lot when i started with classical music.

    And Bach you said it perfectly, clarity, balance and transparency on the highest quality.

    I always think of "what if" he didn´t die so young =P. It kinda makes me sad to think all the masterpieces that would have existed if he had died older :P.

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    Senior Member Tapkaara's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bach View Post
    It is only through recognizing the violence and sensuality at the center of Mozart's work that we can make a start towards a comprehension of his structures and an insight into his magnificence.
    Violence? This is a noun that I have never heard attached to Mozart. Please elaborate your thoughts on the "violence" of this music.
    "Music is not philosophy." --Akira Ifukube

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    Senior Member purple99's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bach View Post
    I cannot believe this hasn't already been created.

    Clarity, balance, and transparency are hallmarks of his work. A more simplistic notion of the delicacy of his music obscures the exceptional power of some of his finest masterpieces, such as the Piano Concerto No. 24 in C minor, K. 491, the Symphony No. 40 in G minor, K. 550, and the opera Don Giovanni.

    It is only through recognizing the violence and sensuality at the center of Mozart's work that we can make a start towards a comprehension of his structures and an insight into his magnificence.
    I agree he's violent, sensual and magnificent. But how do you explain his interest in farting? I'm not suggesting farting and magnificence can't go hand in hand. But have you read his correspondence? The entire family was obsessed with blowing off. They can't stop talking about it.

    http://www.metacafe.com/watch/52257/how_very_fartistic/

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    Quote Originally Posted by purple99 View Post
    But how do you explain his interest in farting? I'm not suggesting farting and magnificence can't go hand in hand. The entire family was obsessed with blowing off. They can't stop talking about it.
    Ye Gods 99, what will this thread turn into there could be children reading this, oh yes, please no pics

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    Senior Member Tapkaara's Avatar
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    Ok, so the guy liked farts...!

    But can anyone please elaborate on examples of "violence" in Mozart's music?
    "Music is not philosophy." --Akira Ifukube

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    Senior Member Bach's Avatar
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    As I said, Piano Concerto No. 24 and the opening of his Dissonance Quartet.
    Si vos agnosco is tunc vos es quoque erudio

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    Junior Member Scelsi's Avatar
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    I'm currently listening to my CD's again but this time in chronological order. And I must admit I'm very happy to be playing my last Mozart CD right now. (And I've skipped quite a few). It's OK but for me, it gets quite boring most of the time.

    As to the farting: in those days, that was rather common. Just look at all the way we currently pronounce words describing intercourse activities and/or things that end up in the toilet whenever something doesn't go the way we like it.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bach View Post
    As I said, Piano Concerto No. 24 and the opening of his Dissonance Quartet.
    To me both of these examples mean excitement and energy not violence, so I think once again it shows how music is subjective

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    Senior Member Tapkaara's Avatar
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    No, these are not violent pieces of music. Exhuberant, driving, energetic perhaps, but not violent.

    Yes, music is VERY subjective.
    "Music is not philosophy." --Akira Ifukube

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    Bach do I understand you correctly when you say
    “opening of his Dissonance Quartet.” is an example of violence in music,??
    to my ears it is quite subdued. I am listening to it now and it really is quite mellow

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    Senior Member Bach's Avatar
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    Well, perhaps not physical violence but violent perturbed thoughts.
    Si vos agnosco is tunc vos es quoque erudio

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bach View Post
    Well, perhaps not physical violence but violent perturbed thoughts.
    In a dedication to Papa Haydn in the "Dissonance" I don't understand!

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    Thanks for the link, It's fascinating! I just hope it won't end up in some private collectors hands and be buried in a dark safe. Would be ideal to have it returned to the Master's birth house in Salzburg for everyone to see.

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