Results 1 to 13 of 13

Thread: Allen Organ

  1. #1
    Senior Member PlaySalieri's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Posts
    3,581
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Allen Organ

    Someone has offered us an Allen Organ

    I know that Hammond organs can be picked up for hardly anything these days and I was going to decline the offer - but I understand Allen organs are a notch above Hammonds.

    Can anyone advise - my son is a young organist - plays at the local church -but we thought an electric organ might be useful to him.

  2. #2
    Administrator Krummhorn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Southwestern USA
    Posts
    4,878
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    I, personally, would take the Allen over any Hammond ... but that's because I am a professional church organist and the better instrument would be more to my liking.

    Imho, Allen's are quite a few notches above Hammond ... but certainly not the best digital/electronic organ by any means.

    Do you know which model of Allen is being offered? I used to be a contract worker for Allen, through a dealership in Pasadena, CA.
    Kh
    Administrator


  3. #3
    Senior Member PlaySalieri's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Posts
    3,581
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Krummhorn View Post
    I, personally, would take the Allen over any Hammond ... but that's because I am a professional church organist and the better instrument would be more to my liking.

    Imho, Allen's are quite a few notches above Hammond ... but certainly not the best digital/electronic organ by any means.

    Do you know which model of Allen is being offered? I used to be a contract worker for Allen, through a dealership in Pasadena, CA.
    We are going to see it next week. Not sure what model - all I have are the dimensions. If it were a hammond I would not bother - as they seem to be going cheaply. I am in UK by the way and there seem to be not many allen organs here.
    Is it true an allen organ can weigh 450 pounds? BTW my son plays the local church organ for practice and we are hoping this allen organ will mean we dont have to sit in a freezing church with him. Will the allen be adequate for practice given he is studying pipe organ? Is the action similar?

  4. #4
    Administrator Krummhorn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Southwestern USA
    Posts
    4,878
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    There are several models of Allen - some of the early ones (analog systems) were not built to AGO specifications and had 25 note pedalboards.

    Most all of the ones built in the US from 1972 forward are built to AGO standards (concave radiating pedalboard, etc) and are used in homes and institutions alike.

    Weight depends upon the model ... they use real wood for console construction and are quite solid. Two grown men and a good strong and steady dolly can move these consoles (the pedalboard detaches easily).

    Some models have internal speakers and other all the speakers are in separate cabinets along with the amplifiers.

    It will be interesting to see what model is being offered to you. The Allen manufacturer plate is inside the console on those with roll tops. Those with folding tops it will be inside the top section - two screws have to be removed from under each side in order to raise the top with access to the inner workings and where the manufacturer plate is located.

    If the Allen has a full pedalboard and 61 notes on each keyboard, then it will be more than adequate for practice and organ study. Back in the days of my lessons, I had a Wurlitzer 4800 model at home (1961) that had full pedalboard and standard manuals.
    Kh
    Administrator


  5. Likes Taggart, ptr liked this post
  6. #5
    Senior Member PlaySalieri's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Posts
    3,581
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    thanks for your comments.
    It has come through an excellent recommendation so we have high hopes.
    I will let you know what model it is next week - we are seeing it on tuesday.
    Sounds like we may have to hire a couple of guys and a van to move it though as there is just me and my wife.

  7. Likes Taggart, Krummhorn liked this post
  8. #6
    Administrator Krummhorn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Southwestern USA
    Posts
    4,878
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    You are welcome .

    You are wise to enlist help in moving any organ console. The organ console could be top heavy and fall forward onto the keyboards if not supported properly during the move. I would also suggest using thick moving blankets as well as securing the console in the upright position when transporting.

    In most models there are pull out handles on the backside for aiding moves. They slide out easliy.

    Kh ♫

  9. Likes Taggart liked this post
  10. #7
    Senior Member PlaySalieri's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Posts
    3,581
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    ok bought new in 1999

    protoge model

    super condition


    is it the first allen digital organ?

    I must say I do not like digital pianos - but a pipe organ in the house is not an option so i can accept a digital organ for my son's sake - he loves it anyway

    only downside is I have to give up a space in my office (I work from home) for the damn thing! as it wont fit anywhere else in our house

    I notice it doesnt clack like a church organ - my son has worked on slow release so am worried he may lose it
    Last edited by Krummhorn; May-28-2014 at 06:00.

  11. #8
    Administrator Krummhorn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Southwestern USA
    Posts
    4,878
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    The "Protoge" model technology is from the middle 90's ... the very first Allen digital organs came out in the early 70's (MOS), and next generation was ADC, then MDS and so forth. With each 'generation' came changes in increased technology and of course much better sound results.

    There are several different models within the Protege branding ... if you can see which it is of those, I can do further research on your behalf.

    The "clack" you refer to is the natural sound of a pipe organ - called "chiff", which is the mechanical sound of air entering the organ pipe to produce the tone. Not all pipe organs "clack" nor "chiff" ... depends on the builder and who does the voicing.

    As to the "slow release" that is most likely the experience he has had when playing a tracker organ ... where with each key depression is linked a physical connection (rods, wires and pulleys) to the actual air valve that opens and closed directly below each pipe for a particular stop.

    As to not sounding like a "church organ" ... well, you must realize that the digital organ produces sounds electronically ... Allen (and others) have replicated the pipe sounds (tone, attack and release) in a digital format. It is going to be more 'sterile' sounding as everything remains in exact tune all the time. I think that for the purpose it is going to be used for in the home environment will work out just fine for you and your son.

    The late Virgil Fox once told me that "it isn't what the organ looks like or sounds like that makes for a good practice session, rather it's the repetition of playing all the correct notes all the time." This was after I witnessed him practicing on the keyboard of a home spinet model organ at the music store where I worked (an Allen dealer) in Pasadena, CA. Dr. Fox had bought an Allen digital at that time for his road tours.

    I have a saying that I keep posted at the organ console in my church where I am employed as the organist:

    Amateurs practice until they get it right ... Professionals practice until they can't get it wrong!

    Kh ♫

  12. Likes Taggart liked this post
  13. #9
    Senior Member PlaySalieri's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Posts
    3,581
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Krummhorn View Post
    The "Protoge" model technology is from the middle 90's ... the very first Allen digital organs came out in the early 70's (MOS), and next generation was ADC, then MDS and so forth. With each 'generation' came changes in increased technology and of course much better sound results.

    There are several different models within the Protege branding ... if you can see which it is of those, I can do further research on your behalf.

    The "clack" you refer to is the natural sound of a pipe organ - called "chiff", which is the mechanical sound of air entering the organ pipe to produce the tone. Not all pipe organs "clack" nor "chiff" ... depends on the builder and who does the voicing.

    As to the "slow release" that is most likely the experience he has had when playing a tracker organ ... where with each key depression is linked a physical connection (rods, wires and pulleys) to the actual air valve that opens and closed directly below each pipe for a particular stop.

    As to not sounding like a "church organ" ... well, you must realize that the digital organ produces sounds electronically ... Allen (and others) have replicated the pipe sounds (tone, attack and release) in a digital format. It is going to be more 'sterile' sounding as everything remains in exact tune all the time. I think that for the purpose it is going to be used for in the home environment will work out just fine for you and your son.

    The late Virgil Fox once told me that "it isn't what the organ looks like or sounds like that makes for a good practice session, rather it's the repetition of playing all the correct notes all the time." This was after I witnessed him practicing on the keyboard of a home spinet model organ at the music store where I worked (an Allen dealer) in Pasadena, CA. Dr. Fox had bought an Allen digital at that time for his road tours.

    I have a saying that I keep posted at the organ console in my church where I am employed as the organist:

    Amateurs practice until they get it right ... Professionals practice until they can't get it wrong!

    Kh ♫
    IMG-20140528-01198.jpg

    ok here it is - what do you think?

  14. #10
    Administrator Krummhorn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Southwestern USA
    Posts
    4,878
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    That is in beautiful condition being from the late 90's. Obviously it's been treated with lots of care by its previous owners.

    I think that your son will find many hours of practicing pleasure on this instrument. Truly a great find on your part.


  15. Likes Taggart liked this post
  16. #11
    Senior Member PlaySalieri's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Posts
    3,581
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Krummhorn View Post
    That is in beautiful condition being from the late 90's. Obviously it's been treated with lots of care by its previous owners.

    I think that your son will find many hours of practicing pleasure on this instrument. Truly a great find on your part.

    yes well it was given to us by a musician whose wife played this organ - and sadly died 2 years ago - it would have been her wish for it to go to a young player with talent and that is how it has turned out. my son is mad about organs. the only downside for me is it had to go in my office and a comfy sofa there had to go - but i dont mind. that bench it came with is jam packed full of organ scores - bach (novello editions) , buxtehude plus some more popular type stuff. But my son's organ teacher has stipulated this is not in place of visits to the church :-(
    thanks for all your comments

  17. Likes Taggart liked this post
  18. #12
    Administrator Krummhorn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Southwestern USA
    Posts
    4,878
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    At least all the main practicing can be done at home, which is probably more convenient than having to make arrangements with the local parish for practice times. I do the bulk of my 'note rehearsing' at home on the piano - the church where I am employed is a 35 minute drive from home, so I only go there twice a week (Thursdays and Sundays).

    There is a plethora of organ music free for the taking on IMSLP, all Public Domain and in PDF format. I've downloaded about 2 GB (so far) of organ scores and retain them in my 'virtual library' for use in selecting music for the church services and other concert venues.

    The main IMSLP page can be found here.

  19. Likes Taggart liked this post
  20. #13
    Senior Member PlaySalieri's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Posts
    3,581
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Krummhorn View Post
    At least all the main practicing can be done at home, which is probably more convenient than having to make arrangements with the local parish for practice times. I do the bulk of my 'note rehearsing' at home on the piano - the church where I am employed is a 35 minute drive from home, so I only go there twice a week (Thursdays and Sundays).

    There is a plethora of organ music free for the taking on IMSLP, all Public Domain and in PDF format. I've downloaded about 2 GB (so far) of organ scores and retain them in my 'virtual library' for use in selecting music for the church services and other concert venues.

    The main IMSLP page can be found here.
    we live in a small village and the local church has a superb pipe organ (made by a Lincoln firm) so it's a shame not to play it. It's quite amusing because the local "organist" uses this super instrument on sundays to play basic hyms etc. what a waste
    Thanks for the download tip

  21. Likes Taggart liked this post

Similar Threads

  1. Allen Vizzutti at Newark Brass Festival
    By Newark Brass Festival in forum News, Concerts and Events
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: Nov-14-2010, 19:44
  2. Kh...Organ
    By hawk in forum Community Forum
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: Apr-28-2008, 06:56

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •