Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 25

Thread: Crumb, George (1929-)

  1. #1
    Senior Member science's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    The Eastern and Northern
    Posts
    20,221
    Post Thanks / Like
    Blog Entries
    51

    Default Crumb, George (1929-)

    I'm very surprised that there isn't a George Crumb thread already!

    One of my favorite works of all time is his Black Angels, which I first heard on one of Kronos Quartet's most popular recordings:

    Attachment 43580

    It has been recorded by several other ensembles as well, so even if you don't like Kronos....

    (In case you already like this, then maybe you want to check out Ge Gan-ru's "Fall of Baghdad" string quartet.)

    I've also enjoyed Crumb's Songs, Drones, and Refrains of Death on Naxos, though it wasn't nearly as life-altering for me personally:

    Attachment 43581

    There is a lot more out there. One thing that is interesting about Crumb's work is that his scores are visually arresting, works of art visually as well as musically. Here is one example of many:

    Attachment 43582
    Liberty for wolves is death to the lambs.

  2. Likes arpeggio, SeptimalTritone, Xenakiboy and 2 others liked this post
  3. #2
    Senior Member deprofundis's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Posts
    3,364
    Post Thanks / Like
    Blog Entries
    14

    Default George Crumb black angels

    I have to says mikrocosmos and black angels is pretty good, cryptic music for catacombs, all i can says was these recording were sutch an eye opener...i really like the gong sections.

    Did Crumb ad disciples(student), and if i like Crumb's black angels what other composer should i try out next?,because has far has i know people here know there classical.

    Thanks

  4. #3
    Banned
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Straya mate
    Posts
    9,321
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Try "Ancient Voices of Children" as well from Crumb.

    Brian Ferneyhough is another great composer, an exponent of experimental acoustic soundworlds.
    Last edited by ComposerOfAvantGarde; Aug-17-2014 at 05:27.

  5. Likes deprofundis, ptr, MagneticGhost and 1 others liked this post
  6. #4
    Senior Member ptr's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Sweden
    Posts
    6,089
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ComposerOfAvantGarde View Post
    Try "Ancient Voices of Children" as well from Crumb.
    Was my introduction to Crumb 30 years ago, still rates very high with me when I need to have a tranquil moment!

    /ptr
    Je suis Charlie ~ I am a certified OrgaNut! (F.—I.W.)

  7. #5
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Posts
    129
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    I enjoy Makrokosmos and Vox Balaenae.

  8. Likes PetrB, starthrower liked this post
  9. #6
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Posts
    11
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    If you enjoy Ancient voices of children, you should also give his Madrigals a listen. It's scored for soprano and chamber ensemble

  10. #7
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2016
    Location
    Not on TC!
    Posts
    1,369
    Post Thanks / Like
    Blog Entries
    2

    Default

    Only thing I have to say at this point from hearing Black Angeks, Star-Child and Makrokosmos book three is: It's so good!!!

  11. Likes violadude liked this post
  12. #8
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2016
    Location
    Not on TC!
    Posts
    1,369
    Post Thanks / Like
    Blog Entries
    2

    Default

    The scores are like: too, like when I first saw the scores to Stockhausen's Klavierstück, where you know it's all there for a purpose that is slightly beyond he comprehension of standard notation because of it's complexity!

  13. #9
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2016
    Location
    Not on TC!
    Posts
    1,369
    Post Thanks / Like
    Blog Entries
    2

    Default

    The Makrokosmos cycle from what I've heard is mind-blowing!!!!! I'm having one of those moments!!

  14. #10
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2016
    Location
    Not on TC!
    Posts
    1,369
    Post Thanks / Like
    Blog Entries
    2

    Default

    Anyone seen his scores? I picked up some today and they're scary (in a good way)

  15. #11
    Banned
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    15,970
    Post Thanks / Like
    Blog Entries
    139

    Default

    This is excellent, with his Variations:

    also, the definitive "Madrigals" is on here:


  16. Likes Xenakiboy liked this post
  17. #12
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2015
    Location
    Scotland
    Posts
    110
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Not sure what happened but his music suddenly clicked for me. Very much in love with his output at the moment.

  18. #13
    Senior Member starthrower's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Syracuse, NY USA
    Posts
    13,598
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Hmmbug View Post
    I enjoy Makrokosmos and Vox Balaenae.
    Just listened to these pieces on the Black Box CD I found at the library. Fantastic!
    “Music makes you feel feelings. Words make you think thoughts. But a song can make you feel a thought.”

    - Yip Harburg

  19. #14
    Senior Member starthrower's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Syracuse, NY USA
    Posts
    13,598
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    “Music makes you feel feelings. Words make you think thoughts. But a song can make you feel a thought.”

    - Yip Harburg

  20. #15
    Senior Member Dirge's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    265
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    George CRUMB: Sonata for solo cello (1955)
    :: Franz Helmerson [BIS ’77]

    Pre-Crumb Crumb. This is a highly-wrought ten-minute Bartók-influenced work of mid-20th-century modernism (but not avant-gardism) that is informed by a healthy respect for tradition. Helmerson gives a clean, dark, ultra-tense, freakishly high-strung and hyper account of it that is rife with hair-trigger responses to even the subtlest shifts and inflections. Helmerson takes a long time to traverse the Fantasia first movement, treating it as scary “night music.” The theme of the theme & variations movement might have been an impression in Enescu’s Impressions d’enfance, while the thoughtfully conceived and slightly creepy variations that follow are rather Ginasteraesque, making me think of the variations movements of String Quartet No. 2 (written a few years after Crumb’s Sonata). The vigorous Toccata final movement is uncommonly varied and dramatic by toccata standards, and it’s brief enough to have you wishing for it to last longer rather than, as with most toccatas, praying for it to end. Helmerson’s is far and away the best performance of this terse little Sonata that I’ve heard.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. George Gershwin
    By Sid James in forum Composer Guestbooks
    Replies: 79
    Last Post: May-13-2018, 01:41
  2. George Sarah
    By Illuminandi in forum The Movie Corner: Music for Cinema and TV
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: Jan-23-2014, 03:23
  3. George Valentin
    By tenorgeorge in forum Opera
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: Mar-25-2013, 17:26
  4. George Enescu
    By Lisztfreak in forum Classical Music Discussion
    Replies: 38
    Last Post: Dec-13-2011, 05:32
  5. George Winston
    By scenicmuse in forum Classifieds
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: Jan-28-2010, 15:58

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •