Results 1 to 4 of 4

Thread: Hill, Alfred (1869-1960)

  1. #1
    Senior Member musicrom's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Posts
    885
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Hill, Alfred (1869-1960)

    I discovered Alfred Hill, an Australian composer, a while ago and quite enjoyed his music. He's rarely mentioned on TC, and doesn't have a composer guestbook yet, so I thought I would add one.

    Pandora has a pretty interesting biography of him:

    A generation older than Percy Grainger, Arthur Hill was the first classical composer of reputation to hail from the continent of Australia; born in Melbourne, Hill was raised in New Zealand and considered himself a native. In 1887, Hill traveled to Germany to study at the Leipzig Conservatory, and in his capacity as second violinist at the Leipzig Gewandhaus Orchestra, had direct contact with nearly every one of the major figures in Western romanticism: Brahms, Dvorák, Tchaikovsky, and Richard Strauss among them. After earning the Helbig award for composition, Hill returned to New Zealand in 1891 and settled in Wellington, shuttling back and forth from New Zealand and Australia, though in 1911 he relocated to Sydney where he would spend the remainder of his long life. Hill was a member of the Austral String Quartet and worked to build both orchestras and opera companies in Australia and New Zealand alike; in 1916 he was one of the founders of the New South Wales Conservatorium of Music. Hill retired from this position in 1937 to concentrate on composing and is said to have produced more than 2,000 compositions, mostly in manuscript; these include 8 operas, 12 symphonies, and 17 string quartets. Hill was made an Officer of the O.B.E. in 1953 and died at age 91, survived by his wife, Mirrie Hill, also a composer. Hill also had a great interest in Maori culture and conducted some of the first academic level research in this area, helping found an institute in Rotorua for Maori studies.

    Hill's musical style was strongly conditioned by his early experiences in Germany, and while it is formally and technically strong, it is a little emotionally distanced; late in his career he expanded his harmonic vocabulary to good effect. Despite his large output and its range, Hill is primarily known for one song, "Arapeta Hira," a recasting of a traditional Maori melody. ~ Uncle Dave Lewis , Rovi
    A couple pieces I've enjoyed were his Viola Concerto and his String Quartet No. 3 "The Carnival". I've seen his style of composition compared to Dvorak, which I tend to agree with.
    “If that is a bassoon then I am a baboon!” - Camille Saint-Saëns on Stravinsky's Rite of Spring

  2. Likes arpeggio, science, Sid James and 1 others liked this post
  3. #2
    Senior Member science's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    The Eastern and Northern
    Posts
    20,221
    Post Thanks / Like
    Blog Entries
    51

    Default

    Looks like there's not a lot of Hill on record, but Marco Polo has three disks of his symphonies. Looks like an interesting tangent to pursue!
    Liberty for wolves is death to the lambs.

  4. #3
    Senior Member musicrom's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Posts
    885
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by science View Post
    Looks like there's not a lot of Hill on record, but Marco Polo has three disks of his symphonies. Looks like an interesting tangent to pursue!
    Yeah, you're right about that.

    There are surprisingly quite a few of his works on Youtube; one user posted a lot of recordings of Australian orchestras, which is how I discovered Hill.
    “If that is a bassoon then I am a baboon!” - Camille Saint-Saëns on Stravinsky's Rite of Spring

  5. #4
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Posts
    2,109
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by musicrom View Post
    I discovered Alfred Hill, an Australian composer, a while ago and quite enjoyed his music. He's rarely mentioned on TC, and doesn't have a composer guestbook yet, so I thought I would add one.

    Pandora has a pretty interesting biography of him:



    A couple pieces I've enjoyed were his Viola Concerto and his String Quartet No. 3 "The Carnival". I've seen his style of composition compared to Dvorak, which I tend to agree with.
    I remember enjoying his string quartets no. 1-3. I too was reminded of Dvořák. Naxos released the final volume of the string quartets recordings (vol. 6, no. 15-17) by Dominion String Quartet. It was not so interesting as expected (I suspect the performance may not be ideal), but I liked no. 17.


  6. Likes elgars ghost, musicrom, brotagonist liked this post

Similar Threads

  1. Alfred Schnittke
    By messiaenfanatic in forum Composer Guestbooks
    Replies: 420
    Last Post: Apr-13-2021, 15:19
  2. Symphonies from 1960 to Present
    By neoshredder in forum Orchestral Music
    Replies: 37
    Last Post: Oct-17-2013, 03:38
  3. Replies: 0
    Last Post: Dec-13-2012, 21:28
  4. Silbury Hill
    By sospiro in forum Community Forum
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: Oct-30-2010, 21:14
  5. Fool on the hill got tired of "fool on the hill"
    By Ephemerid in forum New Members - Introductions
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: Jan-15-2008, 16:30

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •