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Thread: What is your favorite Beethoven sonata?

  1. #61
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    Waldstein is my favourite.

  2. #62
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    Quote Originally Posted by nickgray View Post
    Yeah, a lot of people dislike "honest" playing, especially in piano music. I, for some reason, actually tend to prefer this type of playing. Not that I dislike a more emotional and subjective approach, it's just that it can be really hard to find the one that you'll like. And with the "honest" playing you simply get, more or less, what a composer intended.
    “Honest” in this context means “only honest”. Pollini, Brendel, Gulda are also entirely honest and don’t distort, nor conceal anything from, the composer’s intentions [is this sentence grammatically correct?] , as often did earlier famous pianists. They add dynamism, expressiveness, colour, stress this more than that feature or detail, highlight them, unveil unsuspected potentialities, making the work more “meaningful”.

    I must correct what I said in my previous mail. The fact that Jandó’s Haydn is little interesting portend nothing about his Beethoven: he may play his sonatas very well. Similarly Brendel, who in my (and others’) opinion is a very great pianist, properly ruins Schubert’s last three sonatas by using excessively the interpretative possibilities I mentioned and trying to cram too much meaning into works that have enough of them without Brendel’s exaggerated zeal. But all that doesn’t prevent him (Brendel) from proving an astonishing genius in the same Schubert’s both cycles of Impromptus.

  3. #63
    Senior Member Ravellian's Avatar
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    Besides the obvious Pathetique, Appassionata, Waldstein, Hammerklavier, etc..

    Sonata No. 7 in D, especially the beautiful slow movement and the somber third movement following it.. I played the first movement in a beethoven competition 6-7 years ago.
    Sonata No. 22 in F. the second movement is incredibly fun to play, especially the presto finale.
    Sonata No. 30 in E, a personal favorite.. the variations are so expressive and the finale is so heart-wrenching, it moves me to tears every time I hear it.
    Sonata No. 32 in Cm, I still find it amazing that the second movement was written when it was.

  4. #64
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ravellian View Post
    Sonata No. 30 in E, a personal favorite.. the variations are so expressive and the finale is so heart-wrenching, it moves me to tears every time I hear it.
    Indeed. It is the ideal sonata.
    Op. 109

  5. #65
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    Thanks for your suggestions

  6. #66
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    In order:

    1. Sonata no. 18 in Eb Major, op. 31 no. 3
    2. Sonata no. 10 in G Major, op. 14 no. 2
    3. Sonata no. 27 in E Minor, op. 90

    I don't know why, these three I just like the most.
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  7. #67
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    I love the Waldstein and Les Adieux out of his late sonatas, but I also find his early works to be charming as well. Examples are Op.2 No.3 and both Op.27 No.1 and Op.27 No.2..
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  8. #68
    Senior Member Romantic Geek's Avatar
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    Les Adieux by far is my favorite. Waldstein is my second favorite.
    B.M. Music Theory - University of Connecticut
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  9. #69
    Senior Member Lukecash12's Avatar
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    It depends on who is playing it, really.
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    Nahj ul-Balāgha by Ali bin Abu-Talib

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    I can't say I'm really familiar with his sonatas - I've had a recording of the full cycle for quite some time, but I don't often find myself turning to Beethoven's music. If I were to listen, I'd normally go for the 9th, Tempest, Hunt or Waldstein.

  11. #71
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    I find the first movement of opus 54 very impressive. It appears to be terribly bad music and badly written until you get to the last page and you realise you've been hood-winked. he needs about 3 bars to turn utter rubbish into a force of nature.

  12. #72
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    Not in any order, but my favorites include Op. 26, Op. 57 (Appasionata), Op. 101, Op. 106 (Hammerklavier) and Op. 109. I think all the Sonatas are great if you put them with the right performer.

    I also nod to Op. 13 (Pathetique) and Op 27, No. 2 (Moonlight). They are historic in my love and discovery of music. Appasionata also fits into that category.

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    Senior Member Sebastien Melmoth's Avatar
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    Late E-major Op. 109 with its concluding set of variations.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Sebastien Melmoth View Post
    Late E-major Op. 109 with its concluding set of variations.
    Julian Haylock, the author of several composer biographies (Rachmaninov, Puccini, Mahler, etc.), once commented that the last movement of the Op. 109 was "possibly Beethoven's single greatest movement for solo piano".

    Which is debatable, but at the end, pretty hard to disagree with.
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  15. #75
    Senior Member Yoshi's Avatar
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    Sonata no. 23
    Sonata no. 8
    Sonata no. 14

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