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Thread: Enquiry to fach

  1. #1
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    Default Enquiry to fach

    Dear All,

    Recently, I came across an article: http://www.thoughts-on-singing.com/thoughts%2025.htm, and the author describes a test that might be very helpful in determining correct fach for males .

    Out of curiosity, I tried this voice test and there is an abrupt break to a ''heady'' falsetto at around E4/F4. Refer to: https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?v...42785487480160.

    How accurate is this test and if so, am I doing this test correctly?

    Also, my voice happens to be in good shape today so I decide to vocalize from a low note to my highest possible note in non-falsetto. I seldom vocalize to the extremes though. Refer to: https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?v...44319604736832

    I'm aware that range tells little about voice fach and one should NOT be too concerned with classification in the early stage of voice development but I'm curious to know if there is any possible indication of my fach based on the timbre and register breaks in my voice in the recording.


    Thank you for your patience and look forward to your advice

    p.s. I have only taken singing lessons recently and hence my voice is far from pleasant. I'm aware of my high larynx position and I'm trying to correct this problem.


    Regards
    Alfredo
    Last edited by Alfredoz; Jun-21-2014 at 22:10.

  2. #2
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    I don't know how long you have been taking lessons, or how old you are, but I would honestly suggest to not over-fach yourself in the first few years of studying. There is a real danger in trying to sound a certain way instead of learning a healthy technique. I know it is very exciting to try and find a clear label that would make you feel like you have been given green light to explore a certain repertoire, or like you have "found your place". But this is not necessary, voices change and mature and there is so much that you can learn and try in a healthy way.
    As for you voice, I hear a good tenor sound, but this does not mean you are not a baritone. I have a very good friend that sang baritone for years before "discovering" a great tenor range. Just keep practicing with your teacher!

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    Hi Sir, thanks for reply. I'm 24 years old. I have taken four brief lessons with a countertenor/bass and he said I'm a tenor. Then, he reccomended me to another voice teacher who is a lyric tenor. I had my first lesson with the teacher last week and he didn't classify my voice yet.

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    Hi Sir, thanks for reply. I'm 24 years old. I have taken four brief lessons with a countertenor/bass and he said I'm a tenor. Then, he reccomended me to another voice teacher who is a lyric tenor. I had my first lesson with the teacher last week and he didn't classify my voice yet.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Alfredoz View Post
    Hi Sir, thanks for reply. I'm 24 years old. I have taken four brief lessons with a countertenor/bass and he said I'm a tenor. Then, he reccomended me to another voice teacher who is a lyric tenor. I had my first lesson with the teacher last week and he didn't classify my voice yet.
    Heh, not a sir You are indeed in the very beginning of your musical journey. I understand that you are trying to understand yourself and your vocal instrument, but give it time. Let your voice guide you, instead of the other way around. I said I can hear a tenor sound, but you can indeed turn out to be anything!

    By the way, countertenor and bass are the two polar opposites on the male voice spectrum, so I think you misunderstood your first teacher somehow.

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    Hi Mdm, my first teacher is a professional countertenor but he started singing as bass before changing to countertenor.

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    OK, that is a little unusual, but entirely possible. And it kind of proves my point that you should not try to stuff yourself into a Fach After all, some of the best opera singers have performed pieces that were not strictly in their reported Fach.

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    I have read that many countertenors are actually basses/baritones.

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    Hi, Alfredoz,

    Dili has written excellent coaching for you, and the only idea I want to pass on would be to ask you to trust the teaching of those who are trained to listen and instruct you. Meaning, what you are hearing in your own head as you speak and sing isn't the same as those who hear you speak or listen to you sing. Perhaps you already know that since you've recorded and are able to hear your own voice, which could be a good instruction for you to hear your progress during years of trusting the vocal teaching from others who are trained.

    Still, continually recording yourself might not become a good method for hearing your own progress as your voice teacher would speak of it unless both you and your teacher listen to recordings together as a help for further instruction.

    That's my two cents, Alfredoz, and much luck in your vocal journey!

    R.
    Quote Originally Posted by Dili View Post
    I don't know how long you have been taking lessons, or how old you are, but I would honestly suggest to not over-fach yourself in the first few years of studying. There is a real danger in trying to sound a certain way instead of learning a healthy technique. I know it is very exciting to try and find a clear label that would make you feel like you have been given green light to explore a certain repertoire, or like you have "found your place". But this is not necessary, voices change and mature and there is so much that you can learn and try in a healthy way.
    As for you voice, I hear a good tenor sound, but this does not mean you are not a baritone. I have a very good friend that sang baritone for years before "discovering" a great tenor range. Just keep practicing with your teacher!
    Last edited by Rhythm; Jun-22-2014 at 18:16. Reason: to speel Alfredoz corecctly

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    Dear Sir/Mdm,

    Thanks for the great advice! I appreciate that!

    Regards.

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    This is a bit of a hairy topic to be honest. There is no general agreement as to what a "true" countertenor is, since there are those singers that can produce the countertenor range in falsetto, and those that have a naturally very high notes. My personal opinion is that, since countertenors are very "hip" and popular, some singers push themselves to use that falsetto in order to get gigs and get paid (which I don't argue is important too). In general, range is just as specific to the individual singer as the colour of the voice, so I see no point in arguing over labels. What I do think is a problem is when singers push themselves too much and burn out as a result.

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    Well especially with male voices, it's difficult to tell exactly where or voices will end up due to how long it takes for the male voice to develop. I wouldn't worry about defining what fach, just work on repertoire that doesn't stress your voice.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Dili View Post
    This is a bit of a hairy topic to be honest. There is no general agreement as to what a "true" countertenor is, since there are those singers that can produce the countertenor range in falsetto, and those that have a naturally very high notes. My personal opinion is that, since countertenors are very "hip" and popular, some singers push themselves to use that falsetto in order to get gigs and get paid (which I don't argue is important too). In general, range is just as specific to the individual singer as the colour of the voice, so I see no point in arguing over labels. What I do think is a problem is when singers push themselves too much and burn out as a result.
    It's a 'hairy' topic because people are always so afraid of offending the countertenors by saying they use falsetto. The countertenor Nicholas Clapton has the best attitude towards it, in my opinion: countertenors use falsetto, falsetto is a perfectly normal, natural function of all voices - it's just improperly named. And yes, when using modal voice, many countertenors are baritones. Bejun Mehta sang as a baritone and David Daniels as a tenor before they decided to transfer to countertenor repertoire and therefore falsetto. On Youtube there's a video which shows Andreas Scholl singing in modal voice; he would probably be a baritone as well.

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    Quote Originally Posted by BaronScarpia View Post
    It's a 'hairy' topic because people are always so afraid of offending the countertenors by saying they use falsetto. The countertenor Nicholas Clapton has the best attitude towards it, in my opinion: countertenors use falsetto, falsetto is a perfectly normal, natural function of all voices - it's just improperly named. And yes, when using modal voice, many countertenors are baritones. Bejun Mehta sang as a baritone and David Daniels as a tenor before they decided to transfer to countertenor repertoire and therefore falsetto. On Youtube there's a video which shows Andreas Scholl singing in modal voice; he would probably be a baritone as well.
    I never thought of it quite like that, but this is a good explanation actually. I personally dislike the falsetto sound exactly because it lacks the richness and power of the modal voice (I so prefer a good baritone), but it is a technique in its own right. It is not a "false" voice and it seems popular and if done correctly it is a valid voice type.

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