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Thread: I need help!!!!!

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    Default I need help!!!!!

    Me, a pianist and composer, at the age of fourteen just needs a little guidance. So I started piano about a year and a half ago, but I'm adapting to this instrument very rapidly. So what I've posted this about was to get help on how to ask my piano instructor how to teach my like the conservatories would, but I'm not sure how to say it without seeming too full of myself, like I'm not trying to grow too fast. Does that make sense? Any help would be deeply appreciated, thanks.

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    Senior Member SixFootScowl's Avatar
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    Or perhaps you need a different piano instructor? A very capable piano student might run ahead of the instructor. And a good instructor ought to see this and recommend a greater instructor take over. Temper my comments with the fact that I don't know much about music other than that I like it.
    "Life is too short to spend it wandering in the barren Sahara of musical trash."
    --Sergei Vasilyevich Rachmaninoff

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    If you trust your teacher that's the biggest thing. I know it is for me, and I have huge respect and confidence in what my teacher can do. However, if you want progression skill wise in piano, you just have to practice and do all the dirty work yourself. Teachers are a big help and they should be your mentors like the quote says, "You can only be as good as your teacher". If you don't fully trust your teacher for whatever reason and wish to get a new one that's totally acceptable and you should do it!

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    Thank you, I've come to realize that all her other students are in the age zone of around 3-8 years of age. I trust her completely, but maybe she hasn't adapted to a more intelligent pupil, but thank you for the reply.

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    Senior Member dgee's Avatar
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    I think first you should tell your teacher what your musical interests and aspirations are in the longer term - you might be aiming for a conservatory education, you want to make a go of it as a professional or to the highest standard, for example. See what she says - she might not know you harbour these ambitions. It might change how she approaches teaching you or she might identify new opportunities for you.

    Slightly unrelated, if I could offer one bit of advice to my 14yo musical self it would be to do a little each day of those boring technical things that you usually put off. The best time to start working on sound technique is RIGHT NOW. If you have conservatory aspirations, be prepared to sort your technique

    Also mega support for the comment that you need to hold yourself to high standards if you want to succeed!

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    Teachers who generally have children students PROBABLY won't get you very far if you are serious about music. I've seen it happen time after time with people I know personally. And don't be worried about seeming "too full of yourself". If you're serious about it, for whatever reasons it might be, let your teacher know it, so they can guide you better. When I started taking lessons with my current piano teacher, I immediatly felt a bond of trust, and right on the second class I told her what my intentions were, where I wanted to get and how much I'm willing to give. This made things take off in a pace I never thought possible. I'm now following the basic program of the local conservatory with some added extras. If you don't feel that your teacher can help you progress, than you must decide if you want to stick with someone you know and trust, or if you're willing to take chances and perhaps increase your potential more than you think you can.

    And do pay attention to dgee's advice: don't slack on the technical stuff, make the best of it while you're still at such an young age. And remember, the sky's the limit. There will always be more stuff to learn, so if you want this, dive in heart and soul, because it's worth every moment, be it a good moment or a bad one. Best of luck!
    "To see a world in a grain of sand,
    And a heaven in a wild flower,
    Hold infinity in the palm of your hand,
    And eternity in an hour."

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    A polite but straightforward reply is always appropriate! As a piano teacher, I honestly am always very excited when a student comes to me with a new expectation for their lessons with me. It is wonderful to hear a student say something like, "I'd like to move in the direction of Classical music," or "I'd really like to stretch my abilities. Can we choose a really challenging piece for my next song?" Most piano students don't really know what direction they want to take with their lessons, so I'm sure that your teacher would be excited to see you take initiative! As another person commented above, take some time and talk with your teacher about your goals for playing piano. If you'd like to someday be accepted to a conservatory or school or music at a university, express that to your teacher. If you want to be more challenged in the difficulty levels of your pieces, let your teacher know! He/she will most likely be very excited to hear you say that; and if they aren't excited, that might be a clue for you to look for a teacher who can provide more of a challenge for you. Good luck!

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