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Thread: What is your all time favorite film?

  1. #91
    Senior Member Lukecash12's Avatar
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    Here's a great film directed by Mani Kaul:



    The narrator can be kind of corny and romanticize things like a Westerner, but otherwise it's quite the film.
    There is no wealth like knowledge, no poverty like ignorance.
    Nahj ul-Balāgha by Ali bin Abu-Talib

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  3. #92
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    Top ten, in order

    1. Taxi driver (Scorsese)
    2. Godfather 2 (Coppola)
    3. Shawshank redemption (darabond)
    4. The Big Lebowski (Cohen bros.)
    4a. Goodfellas (Scorsese)
    5. Nosferatu, Phantom Von Der Nacht (Herzog)
    6. Paths of glory (Kubrick)
    7. Amadeus (Forman)
    8. Casablanca (Bergman)
    9. 12 Angry Men (Lumet)
    10. The Third Man (Reid)

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  5. #93
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    In no particular order:

    Shoah
    Army of Shadows
    Stalker
    Faust
    Russian Ark
    Almanac of the Fall
    Satantango
    Andrei Rublev
    Werckmeister Harmonies
    Throne of Blood

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  7. #94
    Senior Member PetrB's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by norman bates View Post
    In italy the same could be probably said of Fantozzi, and especially the first two movies are the two funniest movies I've ever seen. The second one, "The second tragic Fantozzi" in particular is truly hilarious.
    I'm alway baffled by the fact that while here everybody knows those movies and tons of dialogues by heart (there's also the adjective "Fantozziano" to describe something tragicomic) Fantozzi seems completely unknown outside italy.
    I'm told by a film producer/teacher that currently, any film which is dialogue heavy is just not going to go far, the widest circulation winners won't be films with sophisticated character development, snappy dialogue (high or low humor) or anything much more complicated than, basically, an animated graphic novel -- where the actions speak for themselves, pretty much carry the story along, and the dialogue is minimal and barely necessary: i.e. a near to silent film which needs no subtitles, or minimum subtitle, is the one most likely to get the largest sales due to circulation in the international market.

    If it is wordy, if the dialogue is more than minimal, if the character development is subtle and revealed as much by the dialogue as the acting.... in other words, the more fun movies, the better and best movies... are all set aside for consideration of being produced, or circulated, and most favored is a comic-book like action film with a minimum of dialogue.

    That is the report from -- at least -- mainstream Hollywood. Not at all good news, imho.

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  9. #95
    Senior Member Skilmarilion's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by PetrB View Post
    I'm told by a film producer/teacher that currently, any film which is dialogue heavy is just not going to go far, the widest circulation winners won't be films with sophisticated character development, snappy dialogue (high or low humor) or anything much more complicated than, basically, an animated graphic novel -- where the actions speak for themselves, pretty much carry the story along, and the dialogue is minimal and barely necessary: i.e. a near to silent film which needs no subtitles, or minimum subtitle, is the one most likely to get the largest sales due to circulation in the international market.

    If it is wordy, if the dialogue is more than minimal, if the character development is subtle and revealed as much by the dialogue as the acting.... in other words, the more fun movies, the better and best movies... are all set aside for consideration of being produced, or circulated, and most favored is a comic-book like action film with a minimum of dialogue.

    That is the report from -- at least -- mainstream Hollywood. Not at all good news, imho.
    This is a great shame; I've seen Kevin Spacey express similar thoughts in a recent interview.

    It seems like the very well-made, more thoughtful, more dialogue-heavy (and this of course requiring more than competent screenwriting) stuff is moving to TV. It does seem like cinema is just littered with big blockbuster comic book rubbish too often these days ...

    -- [I say that not so much because of the actual content of these films, but because they seem to be adapted more and more badly in recent times, the exception imo clearly being Nolan's excellent recent Batman trilogy]

    I watch a lot more TV shows than films currently. Just got through the entirety of Breaking Bad and The Newsroom (written by the superb Aaron Sorkin) recently ... though very different, both were just brilliant, and so expertly done, both on screen and behind the camera.

  10. #96
    Senior Member MacLeod's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by PetrB View Post
    That is the report from -- at least -- mainstream Hollywood. Not at all good news, imho.
    I'd make three observations here. First, that by definition, the mainstream is only going to encompass what the general public will pay to see. Second, that whilst I'm very happy to listen to worthy dialogue, the prime medium of cinema is the image. The decline in the quality of this, more than the diminution of the value of dialogue, is more worrying. Third, Norman Bates' reference to Fantozzi is an example of something that is surely not unique to one country, or to one medium. What appeals to a mainstream audience in Italy or the US or the UK won't necessarily appeal abroad - the language barrier being one obvious inhibitor.
    "I left TC for a hiatus, but since no-one noticed my absence, I came back again."

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    There's good films out there, but they certainly aren't being made by Hollywood.

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  13. #98
    Senior Member Skilmarilion's Avatar
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    I should actually mention that one of most enjoyable films I've seen in recent times was last year's All is Lost with Robert Redford, in which there is more or less no spoken word whatsoever.

    Very fine film, and evidently well thought of too, whatever that's worth. Indeed, it raked in probably less than 1% of Iron Man 3's box office.
    Last edited by Skilmarilion; Jan-04-2015 at 17:18.

  14. #99
    Senior Member Cosmos's Avatar
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    Will add: There Will Be Blood (2007)

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  16. #100
    Senior Member Marschallin Blair's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cosmos View Post
    Will add: There Will Be Blood (2007)
    Daniel Day Lewis as John-Huston-mixed-with-Jack-Palance?-- what an acting tour de force. Fantastic film.

    I have to confess though that the scene with the preacher 'healing' the old lady's arthritis had my friends and I gasping for air when I saw it in the theater.
    Last edited by Marschallin Blair; Jan-04-2015 at 20:04.
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  18. #101
    Senior Member StlukesguildOhio's Avatar
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    No particular order... and undoubtedly I have forgotten any number of favorites:

    Vertigo
    Casablanca
    Lawrence of Arabia
    Psycho
    The Third Man
    Double Indemnity
    Sunset Boulevard
    Some Like it Hot
    Dr. Strangelove
    2001: A Space Odyssey
    On the Waterfront
    The Seventh Seal
    Virgin Spring
    Persona
    The Grand Illusion
    The Maltese Falcon
    The Teasure of the Sierra Madre
    The Night of the Hunter
    Once Upon a Time in the West
    A Touch of Evil
    Young Frankenstein
    Amadeus
    Mr. Smith Goes to Washington
    The Manchurian Candidate
    Blade Runner
    Zentropa (Europa)
    Mildred Pierce
    Star Wars
    The Nightmare Before Christmas
    Ed Wood
    The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari
    Metropolis
    Citizen Kane
    It's a Wonderful Life
    Chinatown
    M
    The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly
    Rashomon
    The Seven Samurai
    To Kill a Mockingbird

    My taste in film tends to be all over the place. I particularly liked Russian and German Expressionist film back in art school... but I haven't seen most of these in years... something I must rectify.
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    those not sufficiently prepared. Yes, art is dangerous. Where it is chaste, it is not art.

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  20. #102
    Senior Member aajj's Avatar
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    I am leaving out plenty but some of my favorites from the 1930s and 1940s include (in no order):
    The Third Man
    His Girl Friday
    The Miracle of Morgan’s Creek
    The Grapes of Wrath
    Casablanca
    Public Enemy
    The Wizard of Oz
    It Happened One Night
    Notorious



    Two of my favorites from the '90s are Fargo and The Big Lebowski.

    My favorites since 2000 are O Brother Where Art Thou and Napoleon Dynamite.

  21. #103
    Senior Member Weston's Avatar
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    I neglected in my original post several months ago to mention Cocteau's La Belle et la Bête, although PetrB did mention it. It's a stunning movie, each frame a work of art, each line beautifully acted, and with astounding surreal special effects for the mid 1940s. It bears mentioning again. I highly recommend it.

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  23. #104
    Senior Member Blancrocher's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Weston View Post
    I neglected in my original post several months ago to mention Cocteau's La Belle et la Bête, although PetrB did mention it. It's a stunning movie, each frame a work of art, each line beautifully acted, and with astounding surreal special effects for the mid 1940s. It bears mentioning again. I highly recommend it.
    As an aside, I'd also recommend his plays:

    http://www.amazon.com/Infernal-Machi...ywords=cocteau

    And basically everything he dipped his finger into. What a stunning genius he was.

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  25. #105
    Senior Member Marschallin Blair's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Weston View Post
    I neglected in my original post several months ago to mention Cocteau's La Belle et la Bête, although PetrB did mention it. It's a stunning movie, each frame a work of art, each line beautifully acted, and with astounding surreal special effects for the mid 1940s. It bears mentioning again. I highly recommend it.


    Absolute masterpiece.
    "Let me have my own way in exactly everything, and a sunnier and more pleasant creature does not exist." - Thomas Carlyle

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