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Thread: Monophony Central: Plainchant, Byzantine/Eastern Chant etc.

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    Senior Member Jobis's Avatar
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    Default Monophony Central: Plainchant, Byzantine/Eastern Chant etc.

    Recommend your favourite monophonic chants, give a bit of background on where they come from if possible.

    E.g.

    Armenian Chant.

    Wikipedia: 'Armenian chant is now sung to a precise rhythm, including specific rhythmic patterns which are atypical of plainsong. This is considered by some scholars (such as P. Aubry) to be a result of Turkish influence, although others (such as R. P. Decevrens) consider it to be of great antiquity and use it as evidence in favour of a more rhythmic interpretation of Gregorian chant.'



    Mozarabic Chant.

    The term Mozarabic refers to the Mozarabs, that is, the Christians of Hispania (modern Spain and Portugal) living under Muslim rule.



    Hildegard von Bingen, Plainchant




    I need more

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    Senior Member science's Avatar
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    There is "old Roman" and Ambrosian chant as well.

    Are you exclusively interested in the Christian tradition? Muslims chant the Koran, Buddhists chant various scriptures, and so on.
    Liberty for wolves is death to the lambs.

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    Senior Member PetrB's Avatar
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    Default American Indian "Arrival"

    Just as Africans have picked up western materials and instruments to use in their indigenous musics, so here: There is a keyboard / synth pad -string pad harmonic underlay to this chant, otherwise a still strong and stirring one: it includes some traditional hand-held rattles, and a native wood flute.

    What was monophonic remains, but now with a bed of chordal underlay. If I had my druthers, the chant, the melodic line, percussion and flute would be more than enough. But these people are still with us, and this is the way they do it now -- 'what it is', its energy and force, I think still come through plain and clear.

    Joseph Spotted Eagle and others ~ Arrival.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X6kOxHoWPa0

    One side note... North American Indian languages have no sounds which have the mouth closed, i.e. nothing like a P or an M. For those Indians first hearing and seeing the Europeans talk, they thought, "What men speak while closing their mouth?"

    P.s. @ the OP:
    Loving the thread; loving its title. Thanks!

    P.p.s. If anyone knows of this same chant in an earlier, perhaps an ethno-musicological field recording- sans contemporary western instruments and accompaniment, please P.M. me with that information.
    Last edited by PetrB; Aug-03-2014 at 15:34.

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    Senior Member Jobis's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by science View Post
    There is "old Roman" and Ambrosian chant as well.

    Are you exclusively interested in the Christian tradition? Muslims chant the Koran, Buddhists chant various scriptures, and so on.
    That's just my own personal bias showing through, but yes, all religious chant is welcome!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jobis View Post
    That's just my own personal bias showing through, but yes, all religious chant is welcome!
    There is no end of this kind of thing:

    Liberty for wolves is death to the lambs.

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    Senior Member millionrainbows's Avatar
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    I have this one. Nobody really knows how the early chant actually sounded, because very little notation had been standardized. I think they did a good job in reconstructing it, though.

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    Quote Originally Posted by millionrainbows View Post
    I have this one. Nobody really knows how the early chant actually sounded, because very little notation had been standardized. I think they did a good job in reconstructing it, though.
    I love everything I've heard by Ensemble Organum. If you can get hold of their CD of religious music from the Carmina Burana manuscript, it's extraordinary.

    Anyway I watch this thread with interest because I'd like to hear more chant

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    Senior Member Jobis's Avatar
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    Eastern Orthodox (Russian primarily) Znamenny Chant

    The Beatitudes



    Disclaimer: Not strictly monophonic!

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    Senior Member science's Avatar
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    The OLD Russian Orthodox chant was monophonic, but once the pagan west started influencing them, things got corrupt....
    Liberty for wolves is death to the lambs.

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    Quote Originally Posted by science View Post
    The OLD Russian Orthodox chant was monophonic, but once the pagan west started influencing them, things got corrupt....
    Meh, if I hear Tchaikovsky coming from the church then I'll hurry on over and sit in on the whole service.
    Last edited by Lukecash12; Aug-05-2014 at 06:53.
    There is no wealth like knowledge, no poverty like ignorance.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lukecash12 View Post
    Meh, if I hear Tchaikovsky coming from the church then I'll hurry on over and sit in on the whole service.
    Fine with me, but don't expect the Old Believers to like it!
    Liberty for wolves is death to the lambs.

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    Senior Member Jobis's Avatar
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    Some indispensable recordings of Gregorian chant, from the 1904 Gregorian congress.





    And more on this page (scroll down to the video links):

    http://www.ccwatershed.org/Gregorian/

    An eternally beautiful tradition, and sadly absent from the liturgy in many parishes.

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    Senior Member millionrainbows's Avatar
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    I saw a book on Medieval music, and I think I'll get it and read it before posting any more on this thread.

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    Quote Originally Posted by millionrainbows View Post
    I saw a book on Medieval music, and I think I'll get it and read it before posting any more on this thread.
    Yes, chasten thineself post haste.

    Hmmm... I am very much enjoying some of the Eastern references here. Most of my exposure to Eastern Orthodox liturgy has been Kiev chant and the liturgy of St. John.
    Last edited by Lukecash12; Aug-15-2014 at 17:35.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lukecash12 View Post
    Yes, chasten thineself post haste.

    Hmmm... I am very much enjoying some of the Eastern references here. Most of my exposure to Eastern Orthodox liturgy has been Kiev chant and the liturgy of St. John.
    I guess you mean the Liturgy of St. John Chrysostom. In the Eastern Church, there are so many St. Johns that they always or almost always specify. I don't know who you heard leaving off the the "Chrysostom," but at any rate that's an unusual thing to do.
    Liberty for wolves is death to the lambs.

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