Results 1 to 12 of 12

Thread: Mikis Theodorakis

  1. #1
    Senior Member Perotin's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Posts
    291
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Mikis Theodorakis

    Since Mikis Theodorakis hasn't been mentioned in this forum as yet, I decided to devote a thread to him. A Wikipedia quote: "Michael "Mikis" Theodorakis (Greek: Μιχαήλ (Μίκης) Θεοδωράκης [ˈmicis θeoðoˈɾacis]; born 29 July 1925) is a Greek songwriter of over 1000 songs and composer. He scored for the films Zorba the Greek (1964), Z (1969), and Serpico (1973). He is viewed as Greece's best-known living composer. Politically, he identified with the left until the late 1980s; in 1989 he ran as an independent candidate within the centre-right New Democracy party in order for the country to come out of the political crisis that had been created due to the numerous scandals of the government of Andreas Papandreou[14] and helped to establish a large coalition between conservatives, socialists and leftists. In 1990 he was elected to the parliament (as in 1964 and 1981), became a government minister under Constantine Mitsotakis, and fought against drugs and terrorism and for culture, education and better relations between Greece and Turkey. He continues to speak out in favor of left-liberal causes, Greek-Turkish-Cypriot relations, and against the War in Iraq. He has consistently opposed oppressive regimes and was a key voice against the Greek junta 1967-1974, which imprisoned him."


    Mikis Theodorakis is very famous in Greece, as far as I know, but not in other parts of the world, unfortunately. Are you familiar with this composer? If not, I encourage you to get to know him better!

    Here are some of his works that I've found interesting and enjoyable:





    I love you all.

  2. Likes Il_Penseroso, clara s liked this post
  3. #2
    Senior Member PetrB's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Posts
    11,622
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    I think it very much depends upon 'what generation' you arefrom if know of Theodorakis or not. Being pretty much a young adult when the film of the Nikos Kazantzakis novel Zorba the Greek came out, I recall the music from this film music became, independent of the film, very generally and widely popular (one track, at least), the composer then becoming of course as widely known as the score :-)

    If you want to know of another Greek composer who "did good" and of whom every Greek should know as one of their home-boy cultural icons generally held in a wide and good esteem, you should also look into Nikos Skalkottas, (a modern classical composer) who (I think) also has a dedicated thread in this category.
    Last edited by PetrB; Jan-05-2015 at 12:30.

  4. Likes clara s liked this post
  5. #3
    Banned
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Posts
    3,734
    Post Thanks / Like
    Blog Entries
    1

    Cool

    There's a very obscure Greek composer by the name, Iannis Xenakis, who is also quite good. Anyone heard of him?

    Last edited by Morimur; Jan-05-2015 at 14:40.

  6. Likes PetrB, clara s liked this post
  7. #4
    Senior Member Il_Penseroso's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Persia
    Posts
    1,617
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Mikis Theodorakis composed an oratorio Canto General, after Pablo Neruda's book of the same title for soloists, chorus and orchestra (with a large percussion ensemble demanding). First version in 7 movements premiered in 1975, then a revised version in 1981 with some numbers added up to 13 movements. With its very beautiful and inspiring melodies plus using some of Stravinsky's rhythmical innovations, it deserves more attention by music lovers, scholars and critics. Well, as usual, scorned by some snob people, taking it as a lower class type of music, but with no prejudice, I think it's a masterwork.
    In a world which is ruled by gangsters and maniacs, art means nothing but just a junk food and there's no hope for human's salvation throughout... (Shāmlou)

  8. Likes arpeggio, Perotin, clara s liked this post
  9. #5
    nathanb
    Guest

    Default

    I have never listened to Theodorakis. But I love Iannis Xenakis, Nikos Skalkottas, and am also discovering Georges Aperghis.

  10. Likes arpeggio, PetrB, clara s liked this post
  11. #6
    Senior Member Il_Penseroso's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Persia
    Posts
    1,617
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Theodorakis was very famous in Persia (Iran) before the 1979 revolution. He was particularly recognized by leftist people for his two film-scores 'Zorba the Greek' and 'Z'. I was not born that time but as far as I've heard from olders, many people from the middle class used to dance the final scene Syrtaki (Known as Zorba's Dance) in clubs or bars. His song-settings after Yiannis Ritsos poems also packed in a cassette with the Persian translation by Ahmad Shāmloo the same time. Today - and to the new generation - he is almost a forgotten composer.
    In a world which is ruled by gangsters and maniacs, art means nothing but just a junk food and there's no hope for human's salvation throughout... (Shāmlou)

  12. Likes clara s, arpeggio liked this post
  13. #7
    Senior Member science's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    The Eastern and Northern
    Posts
    18,434
    Post Thanks / Like
    Blog Entries
    51

    Default

    I like Theodrakis's Zorba, as PetrB mentioned. What else did he write?

    (If the topic is Greek composers, don't miss Hadjidakis. He's my personal favorite Greek composer. The Agnes Baltsa album "Songs My Country Taught Me" has some songs by Theodrakis and Hadjidakis. If you like that... let me know!)
    Liberty for wolves is death to the lambs.

  14. Likes clara s, Tsaraslondon, Il_Penseroso liked this post
  15. #8
    Senior Member Perotin's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Posts
    291
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    I'm not that familiary with his œuvre, if you want to explore it more thoroughly, I would recommend you this site as a good starting point.
    I love you all.

  16. Likes clara s, arpeggio liked this post
  17. #9
    Senior Member Prodromides's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Philadelphia, PA, USA
    Posts
    926
    Post Thanks / Like

    Lightbulb

    Quote Originally Posted by science View Post
    I like Theodrakis's Zorba, as PetrB mentioned. What else did he write?
    Hi, science.

    I created a thread on Mikis Theodorakis back in 2010 at the Film Score Monthly website.

    Rather than re-type everything, here's the link:

    http://www.filmscoremonthly.com/boar...ID=1&archive=0

    There's only one soundtrack album which offers listeners the more abrasive/"modern" side of Theodorakis and it's from a 1962 thriller called FIVE MILES TO MIDNIGHT.



    In 1955, Theodorakis was a roommate with Iannis Xenakis when they were studying in France with Olivier Messiaen. Other Theodorakis film scores which display the early Theodorakis modernism include FACES IN THE DARK and SHADOW OF THE CAT.

  18. Likes science, clara s, arpeggio liked this post
  19. #10
    Senior Member Prodromides's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Philadelphia, PA, USA
    Posts
    926
    Post Thanks / Like

    Thumbs up

    One album of Theodorakis concert works resides in my Top 100 albums which I wrote about in this thread:

    Challenge Question: Your 100 favorite classical ALBUMS.


  20. Likes science liked this post
  21. #11
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Location
    Redneck Wonderland
    Posts
    257
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Theodorakis' Requiem is well worth a listen.

  22. Likes arpeggio liked this post
  23. #12
    Senior Member Andante Largo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2020
    Location
    Poland
    Posts
    423
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    My favorite of his works are songs Méra Magioú (A day in May) and Se pótisa rodóstamo (I gave you rose-water to drink) with Agnes Baltsa vocal, and also Rhapsody for cello and orchestra, AST 306.



Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •