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Thread: Frank Sinatra

  1. #61
    Senior Member Sloe's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Morimur View Post
    I don't get Sinatra's music. What's the attraction?
    He had a hat with a wide band and under the hat he had a toupée.

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  3. #62
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sloe View Post
    He had a hat with a wide band and under the hat he had a toupée.
    Oh, well no wonder!

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    Senior Member SalieriIsInnocent's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by GreenMamba View Post
    I agree with this. The quality of his voice alone doesn't explain it. Great phrasing, and even while young he had a kind of world weariness about him that came through in the songs. "When you've loved and lost the way Frank has..."

    Of course, he recorded so much over the years, not all of it worked.
    I don't think there's a better quote. Though it was meant as a gag in that film, it is true. I think Ava Gardner is responsible for Sinatra's rise in more mature and often somber music. She broke him down, and you could hear it.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Morimur View Post
    I don't get Sinatra's music. What's the attraction?

  7. #65
    Senior Member Bellinilover's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SimonNZ View Post
    My favorites of the Capitols:

    [img]

    I'd like to know the Reprise albums better than I do, as it seems many are unjustly neglected and even the uneven ones will have unexpected gems.

    The 1967 "Francis Albert Sinatra & Antonio Carlos Jobim" album is an absolute stunner, if anyone here hasn't heard it
    In the Wee Small Hours and Only the Lonely are in my collection, too.

    I have to disagree with those who think Sinatra didn't have much voice and that most of his appeal was in his famous phrasing. It's true that his phrasing was superb, but I also think he had a strong and attractive voice, which only became a bit weak in the "passaggio" area (that is to say, the area in which the singer "passes" into his high register). According to Henry Pleasants in his book The Great American Popular Singers, this was because Frank refused to "cover" (alter his vowels somewhat) as he went up the scale; he didn't want to sound like a classical singer. But Sinatra was a master of legato, which of course is the basis of all fine singing, from classical to pop.

    Just listen to the way he bathes this song in beautiful tone:



    And then there's this song, from the musical of the same name. It's often associated with opera singers (Todd Duncan, the original Porgy for Gershwin, introduced it on Broadway), but Sinatra more than does it justice. The low notes are especially impressive, IMO:



    As for Frank's movie roles, I love his performance in The Man with the Golden Arm. The character was ideally suited to him.
    Last edited by Bellinilover; May-24-2016 at 19:47.

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    Senior Member starthrower's Avatar
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    I've been listening to Old Blue Eyes lately. I never gave him a second thought until last year. But I bought the Capitol Years 3 CD set for all of 2.50 and it's a fantastic collection. I also picked up the Reprise Collection 4 CD, and the Columbia 4 disc set. I don't really care for the early stuff on Columbia. It's too polite, and not the mature Sinatra everyone knows. I think I bought at least six of the Capitol albums. The late 80s and early 90s Larry Walsh remastered CDs sound the best. You can still buy these new from Amazon UK or pick up used copies elsewhere.
    “Music makes you feel feelings. Words make you think thoughts. But a song can make you feel a thought.”

    - Yip Harburg

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  10. #67
    Senior Member Rogerx's Avatar
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    Marvelous recording.
    “Never argue with an idiot. They will drag you down to their level and beat you with experience.” ― Mark Twain

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    Senior Member Rogerx's Avatar
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    Another great album.
    “Never argue with an idiot. They will drag you down to their level and beat you with experience.” ― Mark Twain

  13. #69
    Senior Member Luchesi's Avatar
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    I was immediately impressed by the care he took to sing accurately. Few of those empty, improvised flourishes merely because the feeling just hit him at that moment (like the other famous singers, so full of themselves, so annoying). He actually knew that singers don't IMPROVE a song, during a performance, when the composers have spent so much time on their ideas. To me, it seemed so out of character for someone like Sinatra. So refreshing.

    Of course it's much much worse today with young singers and all their mindless warblings. They don't seem to know why a song is good, from the lead sheet. We have a young singer like this in our ensemble, but we don't want to lose her, so we don't complain..

    What do you call a musician who drinks soda and sings at the same time?
    A popsinger.
    Last edited by Luchesi; Jun-01-2020 at 15:49.
    "We only become what we are by the radical and deep-seated refusal of that which others have made us." -Jean-Paul Sartre

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    Senior Member mikeh375's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by starthrower View Post
    I've been listening to Old Blue Eyes lately. I never gave him a second thought until last year. But I bought the Capitol Years 3 CD set for all of 2.50 and it's a fantastic collection. I also picked up the Reprise Collection 4 CD, and the Columbia 4 disc set. I don't really care for the early stuff on Columbia. It's too polite, and not the mature Sinatra everyone knows. I think I bought at least six of the Capitol albums. The late 80s and early 90s Larry Walsh remastered CDs sound the best. You can still buy these new from Amazon UK or pick up used copies elsewhere.
    I have the Capitol Years too. His best work imv, him and Nelson Riddle where a dream partnership, Riddles arrangements are superb. A recently passed away friend of mine had the good fortune to play in his band as a teenager (a gifted violinist/viola player) and said that Sinatra's respect for the players was wonderful.
    I almost got to work at Capitol Studios, but alas the job fell through. I still regret that. The best I got was driving past it, consumed with longing when I was in LA to work at Paramount.
    Last edited by mikeh375; Jun-01-2020 at 15:38.

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  16. #71
    Senior Member jegreenwood's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by starthrower View Post
    I've been listening to Old Blue Eyes lately. I never gave him a second thought until last year. But I bought the Capitol Years 3 CD set for all of 2.50 and it's a fantastic collection. I also picked up the Reprise Collection 4 CD, and the Columbia 4 disc set. I don't really care for the early stuff on Columbia. It's too polite, and not the mature Sinatra everyone knows. I think I bought at least six of the Capitol albums. The late 80s and early 90s Larry Walsh remastered CDs sound the best. You can still buy these new from Amazon UK or pick up used copies elsewhere.
    For sound quality of the Capitol albums, check out this site:

    http://www.11fifty.com/Site_108/Capi...orecard_2.html

    I have most of the MFSL SACD titles and the MFSL redbook mono “Only the Lonely”, and the sound quality beats the hell out of the other versions I’ve owned. These albums (along with Ella’s) formed the core of my dad’s music library. He had the original LP releases, and I knew them by heart by the time I was 8. His two favorites were “Songs for Swingin’ Lovers” and “A Swingin’ Affair”. When I purchased my own copies, starting in the late 70’s I still enjoyed them but never felt the magic, until I bought the MFSL versions. Sinatra’s voice was richer, the overall sound warmer. This was true for both the DSD and redbook layers.

    By the way Matt Lutthans offers high praise for the Capitol Years set, saying (IIRC) that they were the best digital versions of Sinatra before the MFSL releases.

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