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Thread: Opera singers: How does flexibility/yoga affect your voice?

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    Default Opera singers: How does flexibility/yoga affect your voice?

    Hi, I'm new to this forum and also an aspiring opera singer. I have a question regarding flexibility.

    For you opera singers out there, do you feel that being loose in your whole body have a significant impact as on your ability to sing? Do you regularly do stretching so that you get rid of any tensions, and if so, what are your recommendations, is it more important to focus on being loose in some parts of the body?

    Regards,
    Robin

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    I dont know why nobody has answered you, but YES! flexibility, SPECIALLY on your costal ribs is very, VERY important. When the body is free from tension it will work at its best as long as you have the proper technique which is "diaphragmatic breathing" , which allows for support in the voice, the so called "appoggio" by the italians (insert heart emoji here) you should never sing with your throat, it should be rid of tensions, otherwise you risk harming the vocal chords. And when harm is done to them, even if you ·repair it· it's never the same. Your singing must be on your breath. Projecting foward through the "bunny teeth" your soft palate raised depending on the note, and your tongue relaxed as well. Your neck mustn't be stiff as well as you back. Only focus the tension on your diaphragm. and when I say tension i mean HEALTHY tension. I hope this helps. How is your desire of becoming an opera singer today? what have you done in this journey so far?

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    Quote Originally Posted by lolitacallas View Post
    I dont know why nobody has answered you, but YES! flexibility, SPECIALLY on your costal ribs is very, VERY important. When the body is free from tension it will work at its best as long as you have the proper technique which is "diaphragmatic breathing" , which allows for support in the voice, the so called "appoggio" by the italians (insert heart emoji here) you should never sing with your throat, it should be rid of tensions, otherwise you risk harming the vocal chords. And when harm is done to them, even if you ·repair it· it's never the same. Your singing must be on your breath. Projecting foward through the "bunny teeth" your soft palate raised depending on the note, and your tongue relaxed as well. Your neck mustn't be stiff as well as you back. Only focus the tension on your diaphragm. and when I say tension i mean HEALTHY tension. I hope this helps. How is your desire of becoming an opera singer today? what have you done in this journey so far?
    OP is 3 years old and perhaps not really opera singers on this site, your tip however are great.
    Welcome to Talk Classical
    First they ignore you, then they laugh at you, then they fight you, then you win.
    "Mahatma Gandhi"

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    OMG THIS IS GREAT TO KNOW! I really don't spend much time on my physical body and keeping it limber for technique purposes but it makes complete sense as to why we should treat our bodies like instrumentalists treat their amazing instruments. I mean I treat my body well, but now I am questioning HOW well I am treating my instrument.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Pugg View Post
    OP is 3 years old and perhaps not really opera singers on this site, your tip, however, is great.
    Welcome to Talk Classical
    I just found how to find my posts! hehe. Thank you so much Pugg

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    Quote Originally Posted by Siren View Post
    OMG THIS IS GREAT TO KNOW! I really don't spend much time on my physical body and keeping it limber for technique purposes but it makes complete sense as to why we should treat our bodies like instrumentalists treat their amazing instruments. I mean I treat my body well, but now I am questioning HOW well I am treating my instrument.
    Exactly, we forget that our vocal chords ARE the instrument and it has no replacement whatsoever, so when harm is done, is there to stay.

    Drink plenty of fluids, lots of hard abs excercises are great for breathing support excercises (not the crunch one, but the ones you have to work with your legs, any variation will do) do them slooooowly inhaling reaaally soft and slow,(capacity of intake) keep it as long as you can (this will strech your muscles making them more flexible) , and then exhale the exact same way, paying (this will work your breath support, making it longer, thus making good progress to sustain a note as long as possible) pay special attention to your breathing, start small..making it longer and longer as you feel comfortable.

    Talk softly, don't scream too much, and if you can reduce your dairy intake or better yet, replace it because humans are less or more allergic to it. normally we don't really have a reaction. But if you notice, you will feel a very light phlegm all the time (maybe almost none if your intake of dairy is minimum). the one you think it's just normal to have. Sadly, it's not. And for a singer, it's a huge no. Because it will interfere with the sanity of your vocal chords, in the sense it starts to go up and down your throat and you'll feel like clearing it by coughing softly.

    Yoga exercises for stretching, are MARVELOUS.

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    Also, if nobody has said it here, but swimming is also one of the best exercises for developing good vocal control.

    Particularly useful for strengthening your lung capacity for those sustained notes as well. When I first started doing breathing exercises and swimming I could only hold my breath for about 20 seconds or so, but now I'm close to a minute. It does wonders when singing, and can help you avoid many tone and quality issues that come from a lack of breath support when singing.

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