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Thread: How much time do you spend with composers?

  1. #31
    Senior Member Figleaf's Avatar
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    Today- mostly Wagner, for some reason. And in German, too! Also songs by Goublier, JB Faure, Massenet, and others.

    Normally I choose the singer I want to listen to and don't really notice who the composer is. But I imagine those getting the most play would be Verdi, Gounod, Meyerbeer, Rossini, Donizetti and Massenet.

  2. #32
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    If the composer was the 23 year old Clara Schumann, I would devote 100% of my time to and with her between the hours of 9PM and 12 AM on a Saturday night. It could potentially turn out to be glorious!
    Facts don't care about your feelings.

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  4. #33
    Senior Member GKC's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by hpowders View Post
    J.S. Bach 93%

    Prokofiev 7%
    Wow. Those percentages pretty constant over time?

  5. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by GKC View Post
    Wow. Those percentages pretty constant over time?
    Yeah. The Bach sometimes goes to 100% though. I'm addicted to solo keyboard Bach, but I also love Prokofiev.
    Facts don't care about your feelings.

  6. #35
    Senior Member science's Avatar
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    I went full nerd and calculated it out (in terms of time). In the past year and two weeks, I've listened to:

    8.00% - Beethoven
    7.69% - Bach
    3.55% - Mozart
    3.21% - Haydn
    3.06% - Brahms
    2.63% - Wagner
    2.23% - Chopin
    2.12% - Monteverdi
    1.94% - Schubert
    1.60% - Schoenberg
    1.46% - Mahler
    1.44% - Prokofiev
    0.89% - Handel
    0.85% - Bruckner
    0.82% - Bartok
    0.78% - Shostakovich
    0.75% - Albeniz
    0.75% - Hildegard
    0.73% - Mendelssohn
    0.72% - Tchaikovsky
    0.71% - Sibelius
    0.67% - Stravinsky
    0.67% - Schumann
    0.65% - Fauré
    0.60% - Biber
    0.58% - Rachmaninoff
    0.55% - Verdi
    0.51% - Respighi
    0.50% - Palestrina
    0.50% - Delius

    That means those 30 composers have been just over 51% of my listening, and the top 5 were 25%!
    Liberty for wolves is death to the lambs.

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  8. #36
    Senior Member SiegendesLicht's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Figleaf View Post
    Today- mostly Wagner, for some reason. And in German, too!
    Who was the singer, then?

    I have never calculated it precisely by percentage, but my big three are Beethoven, Schubert and Wagner, and they take up about half of my listening time. The rest take the other 50%.
    ... yet for us will still remain the holy German art... (Die Meistersinger von Nürnberg)
    ***
    God gave all men all earth to love,
    But since our hearts are small,
    Ordained for each one spot should prove
    Beloved over all.
    R. Kipling

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  10. #37
    Senior Member Figleaf's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SiegendesLicht View Post
    Who was the singer, then?

    I have never calculated it precisely by percentage, but my big three are Beethoven, Schubert and Wagner, and they take up about half of my listening time. The rest take the other 50%.
    It was this remarkable CD of recordings made in Germany during the 1904 Bayreuth Festival:

    http://naxosmusiclibrary.com/sharedf...t-SYMP1081.pdf

    http://www.symposiumrecords.co.uk/catalogue/1081

    I bought the CD many years ago to hear the great Hermann Winkelmann, who you will know as the first Parsifal. I really like his recordings in spite of the fact that they capture a rather aged voice. His Wagner records from this particular CD (Walther's Prize Song, Hoechstes Vertrauen from Lohengrin, the famous bit from Tannhaeuser) are ironically less good as performances than the non-Wagner selections, of which the best is 'Deserto Sulla Terra' from Trovatore. It's a beautiful, moving performance which ranks with those by Francesco Tamagno and Agustarello Affre: all those tenors' 'Deserto Sulla Terra's have a sort of nineteenth century family resemblance in spite of their different national styles and languages, being all slow in tempo and emotionally affecting, filled with melancholy. Nowadays it can be sung too quickly, in a throwaway fashion. Winkelmann reminds me of Francesco Marconi in the sweetness of his voice and a certain indefinably spiritual quality, as well as in the obvious wear on the instrument from singing heavy roles for years. I think Winkelmann's lovely voice is shown to its best advantage in the aria from Dalibor, although things seem to go a bit wrong about halfway through: his intonation is not always quite above suspicion, and the accompanist sounds like he has a personal grudge against the upright piano he's bashing away at. Anyway, after owning this CD for years I decided to see what else was on it besides Winkelmann, and I was very pleasantly surprised. It's all Wagner I think, apart from Slezak and Sedlmair I think in the (excellently performed) final duet from Aida. The highlight was- wait for it- a duet from Tristan und Isolde, 'O sink hernieder', beautifully sung by the phenomenal Sophie Sedlmair, who I don't think I'd ever listened to properly before yesterday, and one of either Erik Schmedes or Leo Slezak, I can't remember which. I wonder if I am feeling quite alright: it is unlike me to listen with pleasure to anything from that opera, as you know, let alone to forget to notice who the tenor was on the recording! It may have helped me that the duet was piano accompanied, which I'm sure is heresy (and was almost certainly a practical rather than artistic decision on the part of the sound recordists) but which reduces the problematic aural overload I can get from Wagner's orchestrations. Also on the CD are Clarence Whitehill, an excellent, firm voiced American bass baritone reminiscent of David Bispham; two interesting tenors who were also medical doctors, Alfred von Bary and Otto Briesemeister; a nice recording of the wood bird's song by Emilie Feuge; and the only singer who didn't particularly grab me, one Hans Breuer, and even he may improve on further acquaintance. A productive listening day, anyway!

    http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hermann_Winkelmann

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  12. #38
    Senior Member clavichorder's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by science View Post

    8.00% - Beethoven
    7.69% - Bach
    3.55% - Mozart
    3.21% - Haydn
    3.06% - Brahms
    2.63% - Wagner
    Science: switch Beethoven and Bach around(and possibly Beethoven and Mozart, depending on the list) and your natural listening pattern would match exactly one notable "top composer" list(and perhaps some others) I have encountered. Maybe you have a natural knack for understanding what the "best" music is? I find this ironic, considering how adventurous and unbiased you always venture to be. Fascinating.

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  14. #39
    Senior Member science's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by clavichorder View Post
    Science: switch Beethoven and Bach around(and possibly Beethoven and Mozart, depending on the list) and your natural listening pattern would match exactly numerous "top composer" lists I have encountered. Maybe you have a natural knack for understanding what the best music is? I find this ironic, considering how adventurous and unbiased you always venture to be. Fascinating.
    I thought about explaining that I don't think the past year has been completely typical for me. I've been in a "back to basics" mode a lot of the time. I haven't listened to a lot of my favorite stuff, but I've been trying to bone up, especially on Beethoven's string quartets, which I always fail to appreciate. I listened to them 4 times last year, and the piano sonatas and symphonies each 3 times. I still don't feel I know them well enough, and I intend to do them all again within the next few weeks, time permitting.

    The only who is that high because of my own personal taste is Brahms. Pretty much any time that I feel like I just want to sit back with a drink and listen to something heartbreakingly beautiful, I turn to Brahms' chamber music.

    And I can do that when my wife is home! When she's home, my listening is very limited, basically nothing that sounds like it was composed after about 1910. She tolerates later stuff, but I never when it's going to get on her nerves, and I'd rather just listen to stuff she enjoys because I have enough of that too.

    But my wife hasn't been home today (Korean New Year), so it's been Martinu, Schoenberg, Webern, Xenakis, Lutoslawski, Cage, Adams, and Prokofiev for me today. Except for the Cage, it's all recordings that I hadn't listened to since last February!
    Liberty for wolves is death to the lambs.

  15. #40
    Senior Member Vesteralen's Avatar
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    I'm way too spread out to calculate this. I have a set of 8 new discs each month that alternate with a set of 24 old discs I listen through 4 times before retiring alternating with discs I check out of the library on a regular basis (about 5 a week).

    I can say that the first disc in the first set is always from a composer I am trying to listen to in complete chronological order. The first three composers in this set are Amy Beach, Fanny Mendelssohn and Erich Korngold. But, that doesn't really mean anything.....

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    Senior Member SiegendesLicht's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Figleaf View Post
    It was this remarkable CD of recordings made in Germany during the 1904 Bayreuth Festival:

    http://naxosmusiclibrary.com/sharedf...t-SYMP1081.pdf

    http://www.symposiumrecords.co.uk/catalogue/1081

    I bought the CD many years ago to hear the great Hermann Winkelmann, who you will know as the first Parsifal....
    That is very interesting, thank you! I knew about Hermann Winkelmann, but I had no idea his recordings are even available!
    ... yet for us will still remain the holy German art... (Die Meistersinger von Nürnberg)
    ***
    God gave all men all earth to love,
    But since our hearts are small,
    Ordained for each one spot should prove
    Beloved over all.
    R. Kipling

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  18. #42
    Senior Member HaydnBearstheClock's Avatar
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    50% Haydn, then the other 50 between Beethoven, Schubert, Telemann, Brahms, Mozart, Chopin, Schumann, Dvorak, Bach, Handel and Mendelssohn.

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    Daily log:

    Just spent 30 minutes and 15 seconds with Prokofiev.

    Piano Concerto No. 3. Lang Lang. Berlin Phil/Rattle.

    More time spent with composers to follow.
    Facts don't care about your feelings.

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  21. #44
    Senior Member Figleaf's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SiegendesLicht View Post
    That is very interesting, thank you! I knew about Hermann Winkelmann, but I had no idea his recordings are even available!
    Two of his Berliners are also available here:

    http://www.symposiumrecords.co.uk/catalogue/1318

    They were recorded in 1900 and are in much worse sound than the G&Ts from four years later, which are very vivid. Too bad he recorded nothing from Parsifal. Winkelmann was quite a pioneer, as there weren't that many first class singers making commercial recordings in 1900. German Wikipedia says that he was born in 1847 and some sources give 1849, though the earlier date is maybe preferable since singers are more likely to have subtracted a couple of years from their age than added a couple! Either way, we are very fortunate that his voice was captured in the nick of time.

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  23. #45
    Senior Member Bevo's Avatar
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    Very difficult question, but I'd probably guesstimate:
    30% Tchaikovsky
    22% Beethoven
    18% Mozart
    15% Haydn
    5% Other Russian Composers
    10% Everyone else

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