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Thread: Zimerman

  1. #1
    Senior Member Harvey's Avatar
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    Default Zimerman

    I think Zimerman's piano always sounds so...:wub:
    As he tunes the piano every time he plays, I want to know what temperament(s) he uses.
    IF I hit a wrong key its becaus i kind of like it that way.

  2. #2
    Senior Member Daniel's Avatar
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    I am a big fan of Zimerman. His touch is just awesome. When I listen to his Brahms concertos, it is just perfect. He can develop the weight the Brahms needs. His tone is so convincing!

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    Junior Member liebeslieder's Avatar
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    i don't like young Zim's interpretation of Brahms, since i feel his playing too tragical(when he cooperate with Lenny Bernstein, Lenny is also a tragic performer) to express all the meaning.

    Kempff, Rubinstein, Giliels, Backhaus, ... are my favourite Brahms's interpreters.

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    Zimmerman is one of my favourite interpreters. I've listen Beethoven - 5 concertos, Schuman, Grieg concertos, Chopin - 4 ballades and so on, and so on.. but I really like the sound of his Chopin - much better for me than Horowitz's..
    Best regards from Bulgaria!

    Sorry for my bad English...

  5. #5
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    I went to his master class in Taipei once. I think he's one of the best pianists alive. He's really into his music not only when he's on performance, but also, and the most important, let his music make sense. For example, he handles the timming of each sentence so well by trying every kind of entering he could think of, when most of the pianists only try 2 or 3 and use the one he liked best. Please excuse my poor English, for me it's not so easy to express my thoughts in English :P
    Bach gave us God's words,
    Mozart gave us God's laughter,
    Beethoven gave us God's fire,
    and God gave us music
    so we can pray without words.

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    I think he's a very remarkable pianist--an extremely 'vocal' one. Of the current pianists of his age, he seems to instinctively know where a phrase begins and ends and can 'sculpt' it like a good singer. God knows he's got technique to spare, but I'm never aware of it for it's own sake.

    I like both of his Brahms concerti a lot, and I grew up on Serkin, Bachuaus, Arrau and Rubenstein. Zimerman's approach is probably more 'similar' to Arrau's, but I never get the feeling that he's 'copying' Arrau. He simply has a more expansive, lyric-dramatic approach. I don't find the tempi slower or more tragic--I get the feeling that with the Brahms, he and Bernstein collaborated extensively on the recordings. It feels and sounds like a true partnership between pianist and orchestra. And except for the first movements of either concerto, the tempi appear to be very similar to other pianists (the finale of the First is tremenduously exciting, IMO).

    I've got his recording of the three Brahms Sonatas, the Greig, Schumann and Liszt concerti--plus the "Totentanz", which is just flat-out thunderously good--and his Debussy Preludes. The Debussy is simply the best recording of those very subtle (and subtly difficult) works I've heard since early Gieseking.

    Don't have his Chopin, but I don't like Chopin, never have, so it's no great loss. However, I would assume that his Chopin is probably quite marvelous if you like Chopin.

    I like Zimerman a lot. He knows how to 'sing' on the piano, which is something that some of his contemporaries don't seem to have grasped, yet. It's a lovely sound, IMO, and when strength, passion and fire are called for, he seems to have tremendous reserves of that, too. I find his playing both beautiful and exciting and most importantly, profound.

    And I've been around long enough to recognize it when I hear it, LOL!

    Tom

  7. #7
    Junior Member Brahmsipoo's Avatar
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    [Daniel]: When I listen to his Brahms concertos, it is just perfect.
    I would have to disagree. Gilels and Curzon have my favorite interpretations of the Brahms concerti.

    I have always enjoyed Zimerman's take on the Schubert Impromptus. He and Perahia certainly share a talent for those pieces.

  8. #8
    Senior Member handlebar's Avatar
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    A good pianist that does not receive enough credit IMHO.

    Jim

  9. #9
    Senior Member nefigah's Avatar
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    I've only heard his Chopin, which I found to be not to my liking. Perhaps if I get into Brahms eventually, I'll give him another shot

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