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Thread: Attending ballet performances

  1. #76
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    I suppose it was performed by New York City Ballet,

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    Senior Member jegreenwood's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sissone View Post
    I suppose it was performed by New York City Ballet,
    Yes - I have a subscription.

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    Quote Originally Posted by jegreenwood View Post
    Yes - I have a subscription.
    I hope you will also enjoy other performances.What about Romeo and Juliet?

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    Senior Member jegreenwood's Avatar
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    Not this year. I might have, had it fit in with my schedule. I’ve seen it before.

    I only began to appreciate ballet about a decade ago, when I discovered NYCB’s plotless dances. I’ve started to go back to the story ballets. (I will see “Coppelia” for the second time this spring.)

    There’s an interesting article in the Times about a change to the choreography. Juliet’s father will no longer slap her. Peter Martis approved.
    Last edited by jegreenwood; Feb-15-2018 at 00:41.

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    Quote Originally Posted by jegreenwood View Post
    Not this year. I might have, had it fit in with my schedule. I’ve seen it before.

    I only began to appreciate ballet about a decade ago, when I discovered NYCB’s plotless dances. I’ve started to go back to the story ballets. (I will see “Coppelia” for the second time this spring.)

    There’s an interesting article in the Times about a change to the choreography. Juliet’s father will no longer slap her. Peter Martis approved.

    To tell the truth,I also prefer story ballets to abstract compositions and contemporary dance.I love Coppelia,

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    Member sharkeysnight's Avatar
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    I love going to the ballet. My mom was a ballet dancer, so I saw her many times as a kid dancing onstage (she was tall so she played a lot of comic roles) and it's still a treat to go. Sadly, it's also pretty expensive, at least as a hardscrabble millennial, but it's certainly thrilling. I particularly love new works, which often come with new music, but the classics are difficult to beat. Sadly my last trip to the ballet was interrupted by food poisoning - I managed to get through the entire performance (Swan Lake), but I was pretty miserable for the last two acts and bolted as soon as people stood to, uh, ovade. All that swirling tulle and the rich music going up and down...

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    Senior Member jegreenwood's Avatar
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    My final visit during NYCB's winter season. Highlight was Alexei Ratmansky's highly entertaining "Namouna, a Grand Divertissement," with music by Edouard Lalo.

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    Quote Originally Posted by jegreenwood View Post
    My final visit during NYCB's winter season. Highlight was Alexei Ratmansky's highly entertaining "Namouna, a Grand Divertissement," with music by Edouard Lalo.
    I am sure you enjoyed your final visit during NYCBˇs winter season.Sara Mearns is a brilliant dancer.

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    Member sharkeysnight's Avatar
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    My first trip here in Toronto - saw the new ballet Frame By Frame, about the animator Norman McLaren, directed by Robert LePage and choreographed by Guillaume Côté. I'm sort of familiar with LePage via his work in opera, totally unfamiliar with Côté, and fairly familiar with McLaren, though not enough to know offhand who was who in the ballet. The score was taken, I think, mostly from McLaren's films, and there were lots of audio effects, which meant no orchestra in the pit. I was in standing room in the fourth ring so I still had a pretty good view, but it seemed like it would be odd to be in the front of the orchestra with this yawning black chasm between you and the dancers.

    The actual plot of the ballet was mostly chronological and depicted his evolution of style via inspiration from the people he met, as well as balletic recreations of his works. Some of these were more successful than others - a black-light version of "Chairy Tale" was cute but unnecessary, an otherwise pumping and energetic version of Synchromy was interrupted by an inexplicable twirling harlequin jester character, and while I know it's his most famous work, recreating Neighbors felt like killing time that could be better spent on McLaren himself. On the other hand, "Canon" was oddly astonishing, and the ballet's climax, a live version of Pas de deux, was strange and terrifying and beautiful. I felt like I was floating out of my shoes watching it.

    It's funny that every review I've read has shot down the "Time" segment, which depicts McLaren's relationship with his partner Guy Glover with a set of colored lights downstage that project their overlapping shadows on a curtain upstage. I'm told it was generic, but it made me cry - maybe it's just because my husband and I were finally able to start our lives together, but the shadows overlapping and coming together and forming one figure broke me down.

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    Senior Member jegreenwood's Avatar
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    I was at New York City Ballet last night. It was a part of the Robbins Centenary celebration. The highlight for me was the first work - Prelude to the Afternoon of a Faun." Robbins' choreography, of course. The dancing was wonderful. It's a pas de deux. The man, Kennard Henson, was from the corps, but he was wonderful as was his partner, Lauren Lovette. But most memorable was the orchestra conducted by Andrew Litton, the music director. On a number of occasions, I was distracted from the dancing by the beauty of the playing. That's rare for me at the ballet.

    Edit - I should add that the next two ballets did not use the orchestra. The final item, an awkward amalgamation of dance moments from Robbins' Broadway musicals, did not work for me in any sense, including the musical arrangements. This was a shame as Jerome Robbins' Broadway a full evening presentation on Broadway is a treasured memory.
    Last edited by jegreenwood; Oct-14-2018 at 03:39.

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    I think it's a combination of different things. Some people are intimidated by sitting quietly and watching respectfully (you know, and not jumping and screaming to the point you aren't even aware of the performers; I don't understand how that is appealing, but I guess; whatever floats your boat). Others, as Ginger said, don't have access to ballet performances. And perhaps the ones that are available in their area are too expensive for them. Also, ballet is classical, not contemporary. I mean, there are probably contemporary dances in ballet, but it's not the modern way of dancing. And just like classical music, people think it's sophisticated (which I somewhat agree with; it's a sophisticated, graceful art, but in a good way), and stuffy.
    I think men are intimidated by it because it's percieved to be more feminine, even though there are male dancers, many composers are male, and it doesn't matter how "feminine" or "masculine" something is. People shouldn't allow superficial things like that stop them from enjoying something. But dancing in general is percieved to be more feminine. Which, by the way, I'm a teenaged girl and I hate dancing (general styles), and I know several men who love dancing (general styles). It depends a lot on individual personalities, as well as how they're raised. I wasn't raised to really care about gender stereotypes, but others have been. So if a guy was raised to believe that attending ballet would damage his macho ego, he probably wouldn't want to go to one for that reason. Again, it's foolish to me. There are no biological behavioral differences between genders. Yet people still feel the need to separate them.
    I've never been to a ballet, but I'd love to next year. I think my aunt might enjoy it, too.

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    Senior Member jegreenwood's Avatar
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    ^^^^^^^

    Start the boy with Fancy Free.

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    Quote Originally Posted by sharkeysnight View Post
    My first trip here in Toronto - saw the new ballet Frame By Frame, about the animator Norman McLaren, directed by Robert LePage and choreographed by Guillaume Côté. I'm sort of familiar with LePage via his work in opera, totally unfamiliar with Côté, and fairly familiar with McLaren, though not enough to know offhand who was who in the ballet. The score was taken, I think, mostly from McLaren's films, and there were lots of audio effects, which meant no orchestra in the pit. I was in standing room in the fourth ring so I still had a pretty good view, but it seemed like it would be odd to be in the front of the orchestra with this yawning black chasm between you and the dancers.

    The actual plot of the ballet was mostly chronological and depicted his evolution of style via inspiration from the people he met, as well as balletic recreations of his works. Some of these were more successful than others - a black-light version of "Chairy Tale" was cute but unnecessary, an otherwise pumping and energetic version of Synchromy was interrupted by an inexplicable twirling harlequin jester character, and while I know it's his most famous work,Pnr Status TextNow VPN recreating Neighbors felt like killing time that could be better spent on McLaren himself. On the other hand, "Canon" was oddly astonishing, and the ballet's climax, a live version of Pas de deux, was strange and terrifying and beautiful. I felt like I was floating out of my shoes watching it.

    It's funny that every review I've read has shot down the "Time" segment, which depicts McLaren's relationship with his partner Guy Glover with a set of colored lights downstage that project their overlapping shadows on a curtain upstage. I'm told it was generic, but it made me cry - maybe it's just because my husband and I were finally able to start our lives together, but the shadows overlapping and coming together and forming one figure broke me down
    .
    why the shadows overlapping and coming together and forming one figure broke you ?

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    Senior Member jegreenwood's Avatar
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    Attended ballet yesterday afternoon - Tchaikovsky and Balanchine. First up was "Serenade," maybe my favorite ballet, certainly the one I've seen most often. But yesterday my enjoyment was severely compromised. The head of the man sitting in front of me prevented me from seeing the entire stage. I don't there's any other type of performance where this is more important. The need to see the entire body, the importance of seeing the corps as a group, the ability to follow speedy movement are critical, and in my case lost.

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    Senior Member Pyotr's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jegreenwood View Post
    Attended ballet yesterday afternoon - Tchaikovsky and Balanchine. First up was "Serenade," maybe my favorite ballet, certainly the one I've seen most often. But yesterday my enjoyment was severely compromised. The head of the man sitting in front of me prevented me from seeing the entire stage. I don't there's any other type of performance where this is more important. The need to see the entire body, the importance of seeing the corps as a group, the ability to follow speedy movement are critical, and in my case lost.
    That's not right, you should get a partial refund for the restricted view .

    That happens all of the time at the Academy of Music in Philadelphia. The orchestra seats have "sunk" through the years and they were never very tiered to begin with. I would either get the first two rows of the orchestra, or an aisle seat on the sides, or the last row in the orchestra and bring a phonebook (or ask for a kids seat), or sit in the balcony.

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