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Thread: Attending ballet performances

  1. #91
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pyotr View Post
    That's not right, you should get a partial refund for the restricted view .
    I doubt you'll get a refund just because a tall person happens to sit in front of you. That won't stop some people from trying.

  2. #92
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    Quote Originally Posted by Marsilius View Post

    Does ballet have such an effete image that men, in particular, are deterred from going (it's certainly true that, whenever I go, men are a small minority of the audience)? Or is there some other explanation?
    For years I have attended dance performances at the Jacob's Pillow summer festival in the Berkshire Hills of Massachusetts. There isn't just ballet there, there is all sorts of dance: jazz, hip-hop, tap, modern, world, etc.. I have been pleasantly surprised to see that the audience consists of a healthy number of men. I would say it's 40% male. In fact, there are an awful lot of male-female couples. The audience skews older except for a few teens and twenty-somethings who are probably dancers themselves.

    Most companies seem to sell out or nearly so, so the festival is doing very well. I wish they would get air conditioning, though. They have none and that seems needlessly hard on both dancers and audience.
    Last edited by Open Book; Feb-11-2019 at 22:49.

  3. #93
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jeanette Townsend View Post
    I think men are intimidated by it because it's percieved to be more feminine, even though there are male dancers, many composers are male, and it doesn't matter how "feminine" or "masculine" something is. People shouldn't allow superficial things like that stop them from enjoying something. But dancing in general is percieved to be more feminine. Which, by the way, I'm a teenaged girl and I hate dancing (general styles), and I know several men who love dancing (general styles). It depends a lot on individual personalities, as well as how they're raised. I wasn't raised to really care about gender stereotypes, but others have been. So if a guy was raised to believe that attending ballet would damage his macho ego, he probably wouldn't want to go to one for that reason. Again, it's foolish to me. There are no biological behavioral differences between genders. Yet people still feel the need to separate them.
    "There are no biological behavioral differences between genders."

    Why do you think so? Is this a conclusion you arrived at on your own or is it something you were taught?

    As for dance being perceived to be feminine, maybe this is true for ballet, but not for all types of dance, and not everywhere in the world. Is break dancing considered feminine?

  4. #94
    Senior Member Marsilius's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jeanette Townsend View Post
    ...I wasn't raised to really care about gender stereotypes, but others have been. So if a guy was raised to believe that attending ballet would damage his macho ego, he probably wouldn't want to go to one for that reason...
    I wonder how and when such a crude and misconceived perception (that ballet is "feminine" and therefore any man involved in or enjoying it must somehow be "effeminate") developed. After all, in the nineteenth century ballet-going was one of the best-known recreations of rampantly heterosexual men-about-town on the lookout for the prettiest girls in the corps de ballet, as was well documented at the Paris Opera and at the leading Russian theatres (Tsar Nicholas II's mistress was a ballerina). Men in those audiences were certainly not automatically considered effeminate.

  5. #95
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    Quote Originally Posted by Marsilius View Post
    I wonder how and when such a crude and misconceived perception (that ballet is "feminine" and therefore any man involved in or enjoying it must somehow be "effeminate") developed. After all, in the nineteenth century ballet-going was one of the best-known recreations of rampantly heterosexual men-about-town on the lookout for the prettiest girls in the corps de ballet, as was well documented at the Paris Opera and at the leading Russian theatres (Tsar Nicholas II's mistress was a ballerina). Men in those audiences were certainly not automatically considered effeminate.
    Times have changed, though, and things could be different today. Just like classical music, ballet is not a part of popular culture anymore. I think most straight men today need a woman to drag them to the ballet, but once they start going most of them enjoy it.

  6. #96
    Senior Member Clouds Weep Snowflakes's Avatar
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    Last year we had The Nutcracker here in Jerusalem, still working on visiting Bolshoi one day!

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    Quote Originally Posted by wahidovic View Post
    why the shadows overlapping and coming together and forming one figure broke you ?
    The piece was a document of their relationship, and the basic concept was that there were the two dancers, and there were, I think, five colored lights downstage pointing up at them, each a different color, so as they moved around their shadows overlapped in different ways. The music, if I remember it correctly, was both rhythmic and melancholy, suggesting the passage of time and its effect on the two men and their relationship, and the dance itself depicted it as being both loving and occasionally difficult. The shadows seemed to suggest the multitudes each of them contained, and for most of the segment there were six or eight or ten different silhouettes moving around, growing and shriking and blending, only occasionally in harmony.

    At the end, when they've not only accepted each other for who they are but that time has passed them and that they are nearing the end of what they have together, they, in time with the rhythmic, melancholic movement, came together, all of their shadows coming and meeting to form one unified silhouette as the piece, and their lives, drew to a close. It was so beautiful and romantic, and since I saw it in my first couple of weeks after moving here to be with my husband I found it overwhelming.

  8. #98
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    Quote Originally Posted by Marsilius View Post
    As a very new member, I have been really struck by the number of people who post that they enjoy ballet or ballet scores, but have never actually seen a live on-stage performance.

    Why is that? Is it that no live performances ever take place in the region where they live? Is it that they fear that, although they enjoy dipping into and out of DVDs or CDs, sitting through two or three hours virtually uninterrupted might be too much? Does ballet have such an effete image that men, in particular, are deterred from going (it's certainly true that, whenever I go, men are a small minority of the audience)? Or is there some other explanation?
    I'm fortunate enough to live in Boston where Boston Ballet has achieved world-wide status. And I'm fortunate enough to be able to afford season tickets for myself (hubby is not as entranced and it's ridiculous to pay for him too). If you buy affordable tickets the dancers are tiny and the perspective is not good. Although it's better than I thought it would be as I found out when we bought season tickets to broadway shows at the same theater to take our grandchildren to Madison.... cheaper than waiting for one shot tickets. We got THE CHEAPEST, and it was tolerable.

    Are tickets so expensive in European countries? Is there more support for the arts there?

  9. #99
    Senior Member jegreenwood's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by LAS View Post
    I'm fortunate enough to live in Boston where Boston Ballet has achieved world-wide status. And I'm fortunate enough to be able to afford season tickets for myself (hubby is not as entranced and it's ridiculous to pay for him too). If you buy affordable tickets the dancers are tiny and the perspective is not good. Although it's better than I thought it would be as I found out when we bought season tickets to broadway shows at the same theater to take our grandchildren to Madison.... cheaper than waiting for one shot tickets. We got THE CHEAPEST, and it was tolerable.

    Are tickets so expensive in European countries? Is there more support for the arts there?
    Top ticket price for NYCB is $195. From their website, I see the cheapest tickets are $35. Nutcracker costs more. Somewhat less with a subscription.

    I just bought tickets for the Australian Ballet. The price was about the same. And, as I recall, the Royal Ballet may even be more expensive.

    One more thing . . . did you mean Hamilton?

  10. #100
    Senior Member Marsilius's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jegreenwood View Post
    And, as I recall, the Royal Ballet may even be more expensive.
    I've just bought tickets for the Bolshoi Ballet's visit to the Royal Opera House, Covent Garden (home of the Royal Ballet) - cost was £155 (=$204) each. Good stalls seats for the Royal Ballet itself are similarly priced.

    On the other hand, you can pay just £10 (= $13) to stand behind the very back row of the stalls (actually surprisingly comfortable as there are padded sections of the back wall to rest against). That's very good for ballet as long as you are long-sighted, but it is less good for opera as the overhang of the floor above prevents you from seeing the surtitles above the stage. It's also a good way to explore an unfamiliar work without having spent too much cash if you end up not enjoying it.
    Last edited by Marsilius; Mar-12-2019 at 06:53.

  11. #101
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    https://www.imdb.com/title/tt5460858/

    The hype in the newspapers made us curious.
    Well done by the makers and principal artiest


    Not to be missed by ballet lovers.

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  13. #102
    Senior Member jegreenwood's Avatar
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    Spent a mostly joyful evening at NYCB last night. Ratmansky's "Pictures at an Exhibition" and Justin Peck's "Rodeo: Four Episodes" are explosions of dance (and in the case of "Pictures," of color). When the Hoedown music from "Rodeo" started and Sara Mearns skyrocketed onto the stage, I wanted to get up and dance yourself.

    (The less said about the third ballet, the better.)

  14. #103
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    As a ballet dancer, it's hard to get people in the audience - even music lovers and patrons of other arts. Ballet is viewed as long and stuffy, and many people struggle with watching ballets where they don't fully understand the story (because, quite frankly, most ballets do a crap job of explaining the story/crafting choreography in a way to make it accessible). It's definitely hard to get men in the audience - a lot of our patrons are moms and daughters (typically dancers themselves, or they want to be) and older, wealthier ladies.

    And also, there's the main barrier. Many cities do not have ballets, and the places that do, they're typically quite expensive. Even if your city has a ballet performance, and it's in your price range, and you don't find ballet boring (because many people unfortunately do), it can be intimidating/hard to experience a type of art you haven't experienced before.

  15. #104
    Senior Member Rogerx's Avatar
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    Must see ballet lovers!
    Last edited by Rogerx; May-10-2019 at 05:28.

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