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Thread: Attending ballet performances

  1. #91
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pyotr View Post
    That's not right, you should get a partial refund for the restricted view .
    I doubt you'll get a refund just because a tall person happens to sit in front of you. That won't stop some people from trying.

  2. #92
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    Quote Originally Posted by Marsilius View Post

    Does ballet have such an effete image that men, in particular, are deterred from going (it's certainly true that, whenever I go, men are a small minority of the audience)? Or is there some other explanation?
    For years I have attended dance performances at the Jacob's Pillow summer festival in the Berkshire Hills of Massachusetts. There isn't just ballet there, there is all sorts of dance: jazz, hip-hop, tap, modern, world, etc.. I have been pleasantly surprised to see that the audience consists of a healthy number of men. I would say it's 40% male. In fact, there are an awful lot of male-female couples. The audience skews older except for a few teens and twenty-somethings who are probably dancers themselves.

    Most companies seem to sell out or nearly so, so the festival is doing very well. I wish they would get air conditioning, though. They have none and that seems needlessly hard on both dancers and audience.
    Last edited by Open Book; Feb-11-2019 at 22:49.

  3. #93
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jeanette Townsend View Post
    I think men are intimidated by it because it's percieved to be more feminine, even though there are male dancers, many composers are male, and it doesn't matter how "feminine" or "masculine" something is. People shouldn't allow superficial things like that stop them from enjoying something. But dancing in general is percieved to be more feminine. Which, by the way, I'm a teenaged girl and I hate dancing (general styles), and I know several men who love dancing (general styles). It depends a lot on individual personalities, as well as how they're raised. I wasn't raised to really care about gender stereotypes, but others have been. So if a guy was raised to believe that attending ballet would damage his macho ego, he probably wouldn't want to go to one for that reason. Again, it's foolish to me. There are no biological behavioral differences between genders. Yet people still feel the need to separate them.
    "There are no biological behavioral differences between genders."

    Why do you think so? Is this a conclusion you arrived at on your own or is it something you were taught?

    As for dance being perceived to be feminine, maybe this is true for ballet, but not for all types of dance, and not everywhere in the world. Is break dancing considered feminine?

  4. #94
    Senior Member Marsilius's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jeanette Townsend View Post
    ...I wasn't raised to really care about gender stereotypes, but others have been. So if a guy was raised to believe that attending ballet would damage his macho ego, he probably wouldn't want to go to one for that reason...
    I wonder how and when such a crude and misconceived perception (that ballet is "feminine" and therefore any man involved in or enjoying it must somehow be "effeminate") developed. After all, in the nineteenth century ballet-going was one of the best-known recreations of rampantly heterosexual men-about-town on the lookout for the prettiest girls in the corps de ballet, as was well documented at the Paris Opera and at the leading Russian theatres (Tsar Nicholas II's mistress was a ballerina). Men in those audiences were certainly not automatically considered effeminate.

  5. #95
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    Quote Originally Posted by Marsilius View Post
    I wonder how and when such a crude and misconceived perception (that ballet is "feminine" and therefore any man involved in or enjoying it must somehow be "effeminate") developed. After all, in the nineteenth century ballet-going was one of the best-known recreations of rampantly heterosexual men-about-town on the lookout for the prettiest girls in the corps de ballet, as was well documented at the Paris Opera and at the leading Russian theatres (Tsar Nicholas II's mistress was a ballerina). Men in those audiences were certainly not automatically considered effeminate.
    Times have changed, though, and things could be different today. Just like classical music, ballet is not a part of popular culture anymore. I think most straight men today need a woman to drag them to the ballet, but once they start going most of them enjoy it.

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