View Poll Results: Should repeats be taken in classical music?

Voters
40. You may not vote on this poll
  • Always. I want my money's worth.

    20 50.00%
  • Sometimes -- but only the ones I want.

    12 30.00%
  • Never. Places to go, people to see, y'know.

    2 5.00%
  • N/A, I don't listen to that stuff.

    1 2.50%
  • How can you even ASK???

    5 12.50%
Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 39

Thread: Should repeats be taken in classical music?

  1. #1
    Senior Member KenOC's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    SoCal, USA
    Posts
    19,995
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Should repeats be taken in classical music?

    A burning issue: Should indicated repeats be taken in classical music? Rather than address this in the usual way (communal riots with consequent loss of life) we'll be civilized and allow an orderly vote. Please indicate your preference in this safely anonymous poll.

    If a vote isn't enough, tell us how you feel!


  2. #2
    Senior Member arpeggio's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Burke, Virginia, USA
    Posts
    3,656
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    It depends.

    If I like the piece, like the Schubert Ninth, yeah, let's take all of the repeats. When our orchestra performed it a few years ago, the musician insisted with the director that we wanted to play all of the repeats.
    It is impossible to make anything foolproof because fools are so ingenious. And I am a very ingenious fellow

  3. Likes ptr, spradlig liked this post
  4. #3
    Senior Member Woodduck's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Location
    Ashland, OR
    Posts
    18,302
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by arpeggio View Post
    It depends.

    If I like the piece, like the Schubert Ninth, yeah, let's take all of the repeats. When our orchestra performed it a few years ago, the musician insisted with the director that we wanted to play all of the repeats.
    If your string players insisted on that after looking at the fourth movement, they have arms of steel.

  5. #4
    Senior Member arpeggio's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Burke, Virginia, USA
    Posts
    3,656
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Woodduck View Post
    If your string players insisted on that after looking at the fourth movement, they have arms of steel.
    Not really. They handled it just fine. And we are an amateur group.
    It is impossible to make anything foolproof because fools are so ingenious. And I am a very ingenious fellow

  6. #5
    Senior Member KenOC's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    SoCal, USA
    Posts
    19,995
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Woodduck View Post
    If your string players insisted on that after looking at the fourth movement, they have arms of steel.
    I believe that an English orchestra early on refused to play Schubert's 9th because of the last movement. The violins wanted to play a tune or two, not just go "ta-ka-ta-ta ta-ka-ta-ta" for page after page!


  7. #6
    Senior Member ptr's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Sweden
    Posts
    6,083
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    ..the older I get, the more relaxed I am about musical performance as long as the artist/orchestra/conductor (etc.) presents something that makes good sense. Hence I voted "how Dear are You KenOC!"...
    (Some of my favourite conductors are on like opposite sides of the divide of the composers text is holly; Leopold Stokowski and Jasha Horenstein. For me, both are very seductive in the musical presentation!)

    /ptr
    Je suis Charlie ~ I am a certified OrgaNut! (F.—I.W.)

  8. Likes brotagonist liked this post
  9. #7
    Banned
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Straya mate
    Posts
    9,268
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    I have been having a hard time finding many recordings of Mozart's Prague Symphony which I really like, probably because I discovered it from two different recordings, both of which included the repeats. I find that in the Classical period and up to....Mendelssohn, it is impossible to really highlight the true nature of sonata form when omitting repeats because the form is built on the tension created through moving to keys either closely or distantly related to the tonic. There is no place in sonata form which expresses the tonic-dominant relationship than when the second subject of the exposition moves straight back to the first at the start of the exposition.

  10. Likes Lukecash12 liked this post
  11. #8
    Banned
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Posts
    7,952
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Yes, if specified by the composer and or if it was standard practice to do so as far as we know based on research.

  12. #9
    Senior Member arpeggio's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Burke, Virginia, USA
    Posts
    3,656
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by KenOC View Post
    I believe that an English orchestra early on refused to play Schubert's 9th because of the last movement. The violins wanted to play a tune or two, not just go "ta-ka-ta-ta ta-ka-ta-ta" for page after page!
    Wow. Our little old amateur orchestra could do something that that English orchestra could not do?

    Ken, when you are performing great music, it really does not matter what your individual part does. (Wanted to add the following. When you have a boring part for a great piece, you can dig on the music. If one has a rather involved part one has to concentrate on it which takes away from the listening experience. There are times I have gotten lost while playing a piece because I got wrapped up in listening to the music.)

    Do I need to remind everybody that the whole orchestra, including the string players, pressured the director that we wanted to play all of the repeats?
    Last edited by arpeggio; Jul-10-2015 at 17:46. Reason: addition
    It is impossible to make anything foolproof because fools are so ingenious. And I am a very ingenious fellow

  13. Likes Albert7, Skilmarilion liked this post
  14. #10
    Senior Member Albert7's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Location
    Salted Lakers City, UT
    Posts
    7,739
    Post Thanks / Like
    Blog Entries
    43

    Default

    Can you repeat that again?



    Say it louder.
    "if a horse could sing in a monotone, the horse would sound like Carly Simon, only a horse wouldn't rhyme 'yacht', 'apricot', and 'gavotte'. Is that some kind of joke?"
    --Robert Christgau
    "there's a fine line between having an open mind and having your whole brain fall out"
    --Anonymous

    アルバート セブン

  15. Likes Cosmos liked this post
  16. #11
    Senior Member arpeggio's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Burke, Virginia, USA
    Posts
    3,656
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    I could post what Dr. Cowling, my music history professor, taught us about repeats. Why bother?

    Many here did not like what she taught us about atonal music.
    It is impossible to make anything foolproof because fools are so ingenious. And I am a very ingenious fellow

  17. #12
    Senior Member Richannes Wrahms's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Posts
    1,884
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default It's like a déjà vu

    It's like a déjà vu

  18. Likes GreenMamba liked this post
  19. #13
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Posts
    971
    Post Thanks / Like
    Blog Entries
    24

    Default

    My answer isn't a poll option: Doesn't matter.

    For me personally, repeats have always been inconsequential. Sometime they undermine the piece by rehashing what has previously been done. Sometimes it doesn't. Mozart is a good example where use of repeats should be judicious. They are good with them too. Schubert's Ninth.. eh, no.

    For others, it remains mixed. Sometimes yes and sometimes no. Other times, "eh, doesn't matter."
    ~Karajan is my Lord and I shall worship him~

  20. #14
    Administrator Krummhorn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Southwestern USA
    Posts
    4,958
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    For a solo /concert/performance of an organ composition, always yes.

    For my Sunday service music, it depends - there isn't always sufficient time to do all the repeats like during the offertory or communion.

    Kh

  21. Likes arpeggio, MrTortoise liked this post
  22. #15
    Senior Member Lukecash12's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Posts
    2,637
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Should the same notes be played that are written on the sheets? Then when there is a marking that says to play a whole group of notes again it should be regarded the same. It's hardly obtuse, to assume that is what the composer would have wanted.
    There is no wealth like knowledge, no poverty like ignorance.
    Nahj ul-Balāgha by Ali bin Abu-Talib

  23. Likes Dr Johnson, Weston, N/A and 1 others liked this post
Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Exposition repeats
    By Andreas in forum Classical Music Discussion
    Replies: 42
    Last Post: Aug-14-2021, 01:16
  2. Repeats?
    By DiesIraeCX in forum Classical Music Discussion
    Replies: 27
    Last Post: May-31-2015, 07:58
  3. Works with repeats
    By yosorses in forum Classical Music Discussion
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: Dec-08-2013, 23:15
  4. Observing Repeats
    By Hausmusik in forum Classical Music Discussion
    Replies: 20
    Last Post: Jan-17-2013, 05:23
  5. Repeats in Music.
    By David C Coleman in forum Community Forum
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: Jan-02-2008, 15:15

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •