View Poll Results: Do You Know The Music Of Bernard Hermann (1911 - 1975)?

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42. You may not vote on this poll
  • Yes, I know of Hermann's music very well

    10 23.81%
  • Yes, but limited few pieces

    23 54.76%
  • No, I don't know any of his music until now

    6 14.29%
  • Who cares

    3 7.14%
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Thread: Do You Know The Music Of Bernard Hermann (1911 - 1975)?

  1. #1
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    Default Do You Know The Music Of Bernard Hermann (1911 - 1975)?

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bernard_Herrmann

    BH composed one of my favorite film scores and a great piece of music in general.

    The purpose of this thread is to simply ask if you know of BH's music and what you think of the pieces you may have heard?

    I don't know know much else of his music but his piece unmistakably takes the "icing on the cake" composed before 1960. It has strong characterization of the intended mood and striking for that point in time.

    I kindly invite you to share your thoughts on this fine contemporary composer.



    This second piece is also quite astounding (as is the movie itself)


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  3. #2
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    I voted the second option, I know of some of Hermann's music. I intend to listen when I can find them.

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    Senior Member Weston's Avatar
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    I know him mostly through his science fiction/fantasy soundtracks (of course - I would) and his better known Hitchcock film scores. I think he was an incredible composer with a distinctive style. I've almost gotten to the point I can identify his style on first hearing.

    The Day the Earth Stood Still remains my favorite, though I recently acquired a version of his Fahrenheit 451 and find it very moving and mysterious.





    Like you I only know a small portion of his large output, so I voted option 2.

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    Senior Member Bulldog's Avatar
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    I've heard the man's name, but I can't connect him to any particular film music. I do pay attention to the music in films but not to the name of the writer.

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    The filmscores I "know" were his include Citizen Kane and Taxi Driver, but I'm sure I'm familiar with many more without knowing their provinance.

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    Of the Hermann clan I prefer Bernard over Peewee.
    "if a horse could sing in a monotone, the horse would sound like Carly Simon, only a horse wouldn't rhyme 'yacht', 'apricot', and 'gavotte'. Is that some kind of joke?"
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    I'd never heard of him, but I recognize some of the films, so I've obviously heard some of his music.

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    Senior Member SONNET CLV's Avatar
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    Have several of his film music discs in my collection. And also the following:

    51exzbXILnL._SY300_.jpg

    which is well worth a listen every now and then.

    Try the opening movement:



    As for that film music .... I happen to have a copy of the following disc in my collection as well. On vinyl. It makes for a great demonstration disc. Good sound.

    R-1661179-1279990196.jpeg.jpg

    This features music from the films Journey To The Center Of The Earth, The Seventh Voyage Of Sinbad, The Day The Earth Stood Still, and Fahrenheit 451.

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    The name rings a bell. Seems I had something by him on vinyl 35 years ago, but can't remember what. It was not anything that I recognized as being related to movies.
    “The media’s the most powerful entity on Earth. They have the power to make the innocent look guilty and to make the guilty innocent, and that’s power. Because they control the mind of the masses.”
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    Hitchcock's Vertigo haunts me permanently, and the film owes a good part of its delicate sadness and romantic desolation to Hermann's sensitive score.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_naJH44Lk3I

    Obviously Herrmann kept Tristan and Isolde on hand and asked their advice, but this music sounds to me not like Wagner's lovers but like a nostalgic memory of them. That feeling of beauty and happiness lost in the past and never to be real in the present is as exactly right as the untouchable, alabaster perfection of Kim Novak. Hitchcock slows the action, even brings it to a standstill at times, to dwell lovingly on the woman and the music. No wonder jimmy Stewart is a mess. So am I.

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    Senior Member Chipomarc's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Woodduck View Post
    Hitchcock's Vertigo haunts me permanently, and the film owes a good part of its delicate sadness and romantic desolation to Hermann's sensitive score.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_naJH44Lk3I

    Obviously Herrmann kept Tristan and Isolde on hand and asked their advice, but this music sounds to me not like Wagner's lovers but like a nostalgic memory of them. That feeling of beauty and happiness lost in the past and never to be real in the present is as exactly right as the untouchable, alabaster perfection of Kim Novak. Hitchcock slows the action, even brings it to a standstill at times, to dwell lovingly on the woman and the music. No wonder jimmy Stewart is a mess. So am I.
    One of the top movies of all time.

    How about that first time ever used dolly shot - with the dolly moving forward and the camera zooming in while pointing backwards.

    Or was it the other way around?

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    Howard Goodall's Twentieth Century Greats - Bernard Herrmann


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    Bernard Herrmann enjoyed a great success as a soundtrack composer, but he was especially fond of one of his pieces, the most dearest to him, his opera Wuthering Heights.


    Based on Emily Brontë's novel, the libretto was from screenwriter Lucille Fletcher, that was also Herrmann's wife at the time. The opera was never premiered while Herrmann was still alive, but he paid himself the cost for a CD recording, in 1966. Operatic producers asked Herrmann to cut the score and change the ending, but the composer adamantly refused.




    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0nV5DytV-2g

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    No, I don't know but I do know an uncle who is deeply in love with Hermann, his music and respect his music immensely. Rare but true.
    ~Karajan is my Lord and I shall worship him~

  20. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by timh View Post
    Howard Goodall's Twentieth Century Greats - Bernard Herrmann
    Thanks for this link - I've not seen this and it's certainly helpful in clarifying Herrmann's contribution to film scoring. I haven't yet watched it all, so perhaps it's covered later on, but I find it hard to believe that, like other film composers, he didn't make use of ready made pieces from those who had influenced him.

    I also think that he overstates the state of film composing in the 30s. Franz Waxman's score for Rebecca (1940) is largely 'romantic', but it contains some interesting occasional effects, such as the use of an organ when Rebecca explores Manderley, presaging the eerie use of the theremin in later movies. And it seems likely that Herrmann saw the movie and was influenced by it.

    As for Herrmann's scores, I really like them, especially Vertigo, Cape Fear, Psycho and North by North-West.

    [add]An entry in Wikipedia suggests that it was not Herrmann who pioneered the use of the theremin, but the composer who filled in his absence 6 years earlier!

    The film features an orchestral score by Miklós Rózsa notable for its pioneering use of the theremin, performed by Dr. Samuel Hoffmann. Selznick originally wanted Bernard Herrmann, but when Herrmann became unavailable, Rózsa was hired; he won the Academy Award for his score.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spellb...45_film)#Music
    Last edited by MacLeod; Jul-26-2015 at 11:48.

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