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Thread: Chandos Opera in English

  1. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by Florestan View Post
    I have it. And I also have a DVD Mary Stuart sung in English with Janet Baker that I haven't watched yet, but for the confrontation scene (which is very good).
    I mean more the languages, it's written in Italian

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  3. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by bigshot View Post
    Goodall's Ring is for people who appreciate singing. Rita Hunter and Alberto Remedios are absolutely fantastic. I don't find it to be particularly slow, except for the Rhinemaiden music. I can imagine someone might start playing Rhinegold and not even get through the first scene and assume the rest is the same. It isn't thankfully.

    As for the immolation, that is a scene that requires reflection and quiet power. It's taken much faster by many conductors because the Brunnhildes can't hold out the notes as long as Hunter can.
    Yes, but you can find better singing with appropriate conducting (Solti, Karajan, Keilberth, Krauss, Kna to name a few).

    It is all the same. I've listened to the entire cycle. All slow. Too slow. Misses the drama. The Immolation Scene is painfully show considering the action that is taking place. It makes absolutely no dramatic sense. Conductors like Boulez and Bohm conduct at the appropriate speeds - everyone else is slower. It is common knowledge that Wagner hated when conductors conducted his works too slowly. He once said something to the effect, while at Rheingold, "If he picked things up, we could be out of here in 2 hours." Slower isn't better. More details isn't better. It's such a common disservice to Wagner's music.
    Last edited by gellio; Dec-06-2015 at 19:14.

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  5. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by howlingfantods View Post
    I generally don't even get through a full scene at a time before wanting to switch to someone else's recording. I also can't really understand what words they're singing half the time, so no real benefit there.
    That's why I said unlistenable, and I stand by it. Why would I ever listen to it, when I have over 20 recordings to choose from with better conductors, better singers and better orchestras? Still, I try to return often thinking my feelings will change - they don't.

  6. #34
    Senior Member Woodduck's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Belowpar View Post
    For those who are unfamiliar this is a chance to hear Goodall and Rita Hunter in the finale.

    As I listen to this I can distinctly hear the underlying pulse of the final section as a sort of loping andante. The key to making slower-than-normal tempos work is to disguise that pulse, keeping a sense of tension and momentum, along with rhythmic flexibility, in what Wagner, in his essay "On Conducting," called the melos. It was an understanding of this, and an ability to realize it, that enabled Knappertsbusch to conduct Wagner at slow tempos without falling into plodding and making our brains count the measures. It's a fiendishly difficult thing to bring off - most conductors are wise enough not to try - and I'm afraid Goodall doesn't rise fully to the challenge.

    It also took me a minute to realize that Rita Hunter was singing in English, but I still can't tell what she's singing about. What's the point of singing in translation?
    Last edited by Woodduck; Dec-06-2015 at 19:32.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Woodduck View Post
    It also took me a minute to realize that Rita Hunter was singing in English, but I still can't tell what she's singing about. What's the point of singing in translation?
    That too. You can barely understanding what's been sung throughout because of the overly-long vocal line Goodall creates. Kna is amazing. I never get the sense that he's plodding along and I never get bored. Making The Ring boring is a huge challenge and one that Goodall fully succeeds at.

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    I am liking these Operas in English a lot. My collection so far:

    Fidelio (this is the only one I regret buying)
    Elixir of Love
    Martha (Excellent--not a Chandos product)
    Mary Stuart
    Tosca
    Thieving Magpie
    Flying Dutchman
    and my latest addition, Mastersingers
    Last edited by SixFootScowl; Dec-14-2015 at 03:43.
    “The media’s the most powerful entity on Earth. They have the power to make the innocent look guilty and to make the guilty innocent, and that’s power. Because they control the mind of the masses.”
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    Quote Originally Posted by Florestan View Post
    I am liking these Operas in English a lot. My collection so far:

    Fidelio (this is the only one I regret buying)
    Elixir of Love
    Martha (Excellent--not a Chandos product)
    Mary Stuart
    Tosca
    Thieving Magpie
    Flying Dutchman
    and my latest addition, Mastersingers
    Adding to my Opera-in-English list:

    Wagner's Ring:
    Rheingold
    Valkure
    Siegfried
    Twilight of the Gods

    Handel's Julius Caesar (this one extremely clear diction)

    May be one or two others, but I can't remember.
    “The media’s the most powerful entity on Earth. They have the power to make the innocent look guilty and to make the guilty innocent, and that’s power. Because they control the mind of the masses.”
    --Malcolm X

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    Senior Member Lensky's Avatar
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    My "Chandos in english" collection and everybody knows I don't understand english very well

    - Traviata
    - Masked Ball
    - Macbeth
    - Trovatore
    - Butterfly
    - Don Giovanni
    - Kabanova
    - Onegin

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    One of the "In English" sets I really liked by Chandos was Mozart's Abduction from Seraglia. It's actually my favorite of the recordings I've heard (two be fair I think I've heard only two). I plan to add to my collection in the future. I'd also like to check out the Wozzeck in English, I think with that style I'd have trouble appreciating as pure music so it would be good to understand the words straight off

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  16. #40
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    I'm really enjoying the Macbeth in English right now. I don't own any of the Chandos series yet, but of the half dozen or so I've heard, I'm strongly considering adding the Macbeth and Abduction from Seraglia to my library

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    I've recently just finished Ariadne on Naxos with Christine Brewer, Alice Coote and Alan Opie et al. Lovely recording and highly enjoyable in English. You get the gist of it much more easily.
    "...it is said that first your heart sings, then you play. I think if it is not like that, then it is only just combination of notes, isn't it? " - Pandit Nikhil Banerjee, Master of the Sitar.

    ‘When in trouble, when in doubt, run in circles, scream and shout!‘

    ‘It will be alright in the end. If it’s not alright, it’s not the end!’

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  19. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by Barbebleu View Post
    I've recently just finished Ariadne on Naxos with Christine Brewer, Alice Coote and Alan Opie et al. Lovely recording and highly enjoyable in English. You get the gist of it much more easily.
    I am gutted........you off all people.....what's next, into disco?

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    Senior Member Barbebleu's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pugg View Post
    I am gutted........you off all people.....what's next, into disco?
    But you must know I'm a huge fan of Richard Strauss and being British I quite like hearing stuff in my own language from time to time.
    "...it is said that first your heart sings, then you play. I think if it is not like that, then it is only just combination of notes, isn't it? " - Pandit Nikhil Banerjee, Master of the Sitar.

    ‘When in trouble, when in doubt, run in circles, scream and shout!‘

    ‘It will be alright in the end. If it’s not alright, it’s not the end!’

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  22. #44
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    I would rather hear operas in their original languages simply because the words were specifically wedded to the music. Translating to ESL usually creates some awkward moments, music to words.

    Also, many of the Chandos English singers' diction is so bad that any advantage to a native English speaker is quickly lost.

    I would rather not know the meaning of every word in the original language, but through study of the libretto, make the effort to listen to all operas in their native languages.
    Last edited by hpowders; Jul-17-2017 at 18:28.

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    Translating to ESL usually creates some awkward moments, music to words.
    That's true, of course, particularly with a bad singing translation. But I think that there's room for both original language performances, and performances translated into the audience's native tongue. It would be nice if everyone made a "thorough study of the libretto", but not all of us have the time to do that.

    Also, many of the Chandos English singers' diction is so bad that any advantage to a native English speaker is quickly lost.
    That's a problem with execution, not an indictment of opera in translation. But I agree that if you're going to go to the trouble of translating and performing an opera, you should assure that the text is intelligible.

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