Likes Likes:  0
Results 1 to 3 of 3

Thread: Buddhist chants

  1. #1
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Lakeland, FL
    Posts
    171
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Buddhist chants

    I've seen several references to Gregorian chant around this site, but I would like to share with you other traditions of chanting, from Buddhism. Here are some links to audio files of Buddhist chant:

    Theravada - "the way of the elders," the oldest form of Buddhism (before 1950, sometimes referred to as Hinayana, or "the lesser vehicle") -
    www.buddhanet.net
    www.BuddhaMind.cjb.net
    http://www.sobhana.net

    Mahayana - "the greater vehicle" -
    http://www.lamrim.com/prayers (English)
    http://www.gbm-online.com/index.asp
    http://www.siddham.org/yuan_english/..._download.html
    http://www.wildmind.org/meditation/mantra/

    Pure Land - a particular school of Mahayana Buddhism, but I am separating these references because chanting has a much more important part in the devotional life of Pure Land followers -
    http://www.drba.org/online/audio/sut...alogID=11.html
    http://www.amtbweb.org/
    http://www.amitabha-gallery.org/chants.htm

    If you have trouble with the terminology, I suggest you download a free reference book at -
    http://www.buddhanet.net/pdf_file/budglossary.pdf
    If you prefer to download from the webpage, go here -
    http://buddhanet.net/ebooks_g.htm
    (This is the next to last book on the page.)

  2. #2
    Senior Member SPR's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    MA, USA
    Posts
    263
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    interesting.

    I sampled this: http://www.sobhana.net/audio/chants/...tthi/index.htm

    not really my cup of tea, at first try. Some of it got a little annoying after several minutes actually.

    Is that bad karma to say that?

  3. #3
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Lakeland, FL
    Posts
    171
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    I'm certainly not qualified to talk about karma, good or bad (or other such Buddhist topics), but it is interesting that you began with the chanting by Talalle Chandakitthi Thero. Those are the only chants on that list that to me have a distinctive, personal sound.

    There is some question about how much you need to understand the text to appreciate vocal music. Here are translations into English for the texts that I could find. Another question - pertinent to discussion of Buddhist chanting or Christian shape-note singing - if you are outside that tradition, can you really "get" it? And, is it appropriate to consider (and perhaps judge) the music and performances as music and performances? Does that get into intentionality: is it intended to be taken on its own?

    Most of these texts are from www.accesstoinsight.org, which has a huge library of Theravada suttas (the Pali form, used in Theravada Buddhism, of the Sanscrit word sutra, used in Mahayana Buddhism). You can download the entire library in one zip file. Also, many of these chants are available on Youtube.com. A number of them have Wikipedia.org articles as well.

    Set Pirit - a sequence of texts that among some laypeople takes on almost a superstitious function
    text: http://www.accesstoinsight.org/lib/a...rotection.html
    bilingual (English/Pali) texts: http://www.aimwell.org/Books/Suttas/.../paritta1.html (and following)

    Dhammacakka Sutta (also known as Dhammacakkappavattana Sutta) - this is the famous first sermon of the Buddha, which includes the four noble truths and the eightfold path; there are many translations available online
    text: http://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipit....011.piya.html

    Girimananda Sutta
    text: http://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipit....060.piya.html

    Maha-samaya Sutta
    text: http://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipit...20.0.than.html

    Parabhava Sutta
    http://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipit...1.06.nara.html

    Vasala Sutta
    http://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipit...1.07.piya.html

    Tesatta Nyana Vandana
    I cannot find this; the word "vandana" refers to prostration.

    Maha Jayamangala Gatha
    According to the accesstoinsight.org website, "a set of eight benedictory stanzas extolling the virtues of the Buddha, may also be cited as a popular custom partly related to the chanting of pirit." The recitation of these texts is especially associated with marriages; www.jayamangala.com is a Sri Lankan dating site.
    text (English and Pali): http://www.ripl.or.kr/Archives/Literature/e009.htm

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •